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Old 02-21-2003, 06:21 PM
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csnow csnow is offline
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Join Date: May 2002
Location: Mass
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Quote:
Originally posted by EricSilver
2. Pry top bushing down(?) and out from around bolt.

3. Remove the bolt by angling through idler arm hole and sliding up and out.
Top bushing would be going upwards in this case. As you probably noticed in the thread, I had no luck with this removal technique. Hopefully it will work for you.

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4. Reassemble in reverse -- angle bolt in from top, align bolt, slide in upper bushing, slide in lower bushing, attach nut and tighten as hard as possible.
Use the proper torque value. I forget what it is.

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Q: Do both front wheels have to be off the ground, or can I just jack up the right side of the car?
I strongly suggest supporting the entire front end properly with jack stands. Much safer, and better access. Indeed, you may want to lift the engine slightly with the jack for better clearance, so having it on stands helps there, though this was still not enough clearance for me.

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Q: Do I need to be underneath the car, or can I get at the idler arm after removing the right-side wheel?
You will want to be able to get under the car.

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Q: If I install the bolt upside down, as is suggested in the thread, do I also reverse the order of the washer and what appears to be a type of cap that comes with the kit? (See photo.)
The cap is designed to keep water and debris out of the bushing tube. I would put it on top. I believe there is also a spacer washer that is not shown. I'm not sure where it should go in an upside-down scenario. I believe Larry Bible asked this exact question in another thread, and got an answer. See if you can find it.

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Q: How tight do I need to tighten the bolt?
I forget the torque value. I believe I already stated my concern about getting the proper torque value for an upside-down mounting. Torque values always apply to the nut in a nut & bolt scenario. There must be a reason for this convention. My theoretical guess is that slightly more torque would be required on the bolt end to be equivalent. Why? There would be some additional friction on the bolt shank as it turns within the bushing. Put another way, how much torque is required to spin the bolt before the nut is even applied to the equation? This higher 'baseline' value would need to be added to the total torque. That's my theory to explain the convention.
I have not tested this theory or done any research. Close enough? Probably, but I really do not know. Enough on that. Arthur is probably right. I'm sure if it's just a couple of Ft-lbs either way, it's no big deal anyways.

Best of luck, and happy wrenching!
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Last edited by csnow; 02-21-2003 at 06:30 PM.
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