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  #1  
Old 12-06-2005, 10:28 AM
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Exclamation #!! I am finally going to learn to Weld.. need recommendation for a used Welder..

I am angry as H___ after I sat at a repair Shop waiting for a $30 weld on my exhaust pipe. I watched the manager outright lie to a Lady about his ability to diagnose her car's not passing emissions. He didn't even ask if it was CO or NOX, and I knew he was bluffing about his ability to solve the problem since he has no emissions equipment. I've seen this guy in action before. He's not as bad as others, but he can be very naughty.

Anyway I paid for my Weld and when I left I was PO'd at myself about having to do business with such a jerk. I always put off buying a welder because I figured the welder and all the associated grinding, cutting and prep equipment would run $2000 at least.

Next spring I am going to weld the floor in my 300D myself. I am also going to cut the wheel arch and rear rocker panel ( under the trunk) off of a car and weld it on myself. I am told Mercedes 300D metal has high lead content and is hard to weld. Please tell me what kind of welder I need and i will buy it next month....
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  #2  
Old 12-06-2005, 11:15 AM
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I've never heard about any lead content in any kind of steel. Maybe you are thinking about the carbon content? Anyway I've done minor welding with a small Lincoln arc welder that I found new at a garage sale for $30. It basically looks like an oversized battery charger. I've done wonders with it but I've never tried anything on a big scale like a floor in a car. It's paid for itself many times over since I've had it.
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  #3  
Old 12-06-2005, 11:24 AM
deferr's Avatar
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for garage bodywork a cheap mig welder would work great. You don't need much power since the heaviest body work would be would be MAYBE 16 gauge probably more like 18. I'm doing up an old 68 250S (check the website in my signature). I used a mig welder and after: grinding with a DA sander, sanding with a scotch brite, then hammer and dolly work only a SMALL amount of filler would be necessary. By small I mean about 1/16 inch deep. This is the best bet if your a DIYer. I have used TIG quite a bit for work but it's a LOT harder to learn and you have to have perfect fit pieces and weld on a regular basis.
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  #4  
Old 12-06-2005, 11:29 AM
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Weld

Hey Carrameow
Stop over...I have a mig welder....you can practice...I just finished my coupe.
I have right and left floor panels and frame rail sections . I also fabricated the curved frame rail over the wheel well all Made of 18 AWG steel.
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  #5  
Old 12-06-2005, 11:29 AM
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I agree a mig welder for the floors...a stick welder is too hard to control at the low amps needed....(for someone new at welding)


but first.....practice..practice....practice...before attempting on your car.
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  #6  
Old 12-06-2005, 11:37 AM
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I've had a MIG welder since 1985 and will testify that this is probably the most important tool in my shop next to the air compressor. It will open up a whole new world for you. Get the 110volt model and that way you are mobile.
The thinner the metal the more difficult it is to weld without burning through.
Start on something like 1/8 inch steel and just get the hang of it. Before you know it you will be welding like a champ. Oh, and clean the heck out of the metal that you are going to weld.

Good luck,
Tom
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  #7  
Old 12-06-2005, 11:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boneheaddoctor
I agree a mig welder for the floors...a stick welder is too hard to control at the low amps needed....(for someone new at welding)


but first.....practice..practice....practice...before attempting on your car.
I have to chime in and agree. A basic MIG is easy to use. I bought a Hobart handler about 14 years ago. They were bought out by Miller (I think). I'd look for a unit that's 220V and one that can do some aluminum - not that you should expect miracles, but for in a pinch. A MIG is good for autobody work while on your back under the car where it's hard enough to get ONE hand near the work. Also, get a basic, autodarkening helmet with a few shade settings.
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  #8  
Old 12-06-2005, 11:52 AM
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Poor Rich. I see Tom advised you to go 110V and I said 220V. Both have pros and cons. I bought a 110V and it works fine. I didn't used to feel the portability aspect meant anything, but now I realize that since I moved and my lousy little garage has 1 110V circuit, it probably is worth more than I think. Sometimes I wish it had a little more power though, that's why I said 220V. More important than the voltage is quality and features. You should take Anthony up on his kind offer and try one.
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  #9  
Old 12-06-2005, 12:40 PM
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Have you heard of a magazine from the UK called "Practical Classics"? It's available at both Borders and Barnes and Noble booksellers, and probably many more. It is focused on the Do-it-Yourselfer and has great write ups about selecting tools, equipment, etc... The latest issue had an article on MIG welders that was very informative for someone looking at trying welding for the first time, myself included.

Hmmm, wonder why the U.S. can't put out magazines like this.
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  #10  
Old 12-06-2005, 01:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SD Blue
Have you heard of a magazine from the UK called "Practical Classics"? It's available at both Borders and Barnes and Noble booksellers, and probably many more. It is focused on the Do-it-Yourselfer and has great write ups about selecting tools, equipment, etc... The latest issue had an article on MIG welders that was very informative for someone looking at trying welding for the first time, myself included.

Hmmm, wonder why the U.S. can't put out magazines like this.
I guess the Brits have fewer people with the cash to pay dealers to do the work.......

or we just have too many people here that grew up not knowing how to do anything becasue their parents couldn't either....or were too lazy.
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1983 300D W123
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"He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you." - Friedrich Nietzsche
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  #11  
Old 12-06-2005, 01:47 PM
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Smile Data you will need

Mig/Fluxcore 130EN Turbo Welder is one of three welders I own and use.
Item: 4097-0035
Ship Weight: 55.00 lbs.
http://www.wttool.com/p/4097-0035

http://www.wttool.com/search.php?Search_Type=AND&q=mig+welder&x=9&y=8

Here is a thread you need to read.

Keep that diesel on the road, Welding rust holes
http://www.peachparts.com/shopforum/bodywork-repair-paint-tools-tips-tricks/137816-keep-diesel-road-welding-rust-holes.html#post1019930
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  #12  
Old 12-06-2005, 05:15 PM
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I would consider getting a dual purpose mig. One that could run flux core and switch over for gas. Not all are dual purpose by a long shot. Think you are better off around rust with the flux core but if you have basically clean metal the gas enclosure of the weld is superior in my opinion for strength and appearance. You cannot weld even in a light breeze with gas though. It blows the protective gas bubble away. Good place to buy sometimes is a bankrupcy sale of a garage business as you do not need a lot of power or a big unit. Also like far too many claims these days some brands put out what they advertise or more while others seem weak. Try to get a unit with at least 100 amp output available. The majority have thermal protection of the transformer so you do not have to worry about burning them out like you do with a stick welder. I personally found the italian built units pretty good for the money all around. At one time think 90% of the small to medium size mig welders in the world were italian built. Anyways they are quite versitile and the learning curve is a lot flatter than learning stick welding. Just my opinion.
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  #13  
Old 12-06-2005, 07:36 PM
Brandon314159
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My first welding experience was welding patch panels in a rusted out floor of a VW bug...(going into a baja).

I picked it up pretty fast and now anything that isn't as thin as a fingermail and rusted/covered with gooey crap is a breeze.

We have a mig welder as well...older snap-on upright model...220V 100% duty cycle (important for some jobs). Its for autobody work but has no problem doing up some pretty think stuff.

Obviously I am pretty green still but deinfely don't get something that you are always underpowered cursing at it. Being able to select exactly what you want (heat and wirespeed) has been the biggest help for me.

Go autotinting hoods!!!
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  #14  
Old 12-06-2005, 07:49 PM
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If you want the mercedes of welders get a Miller. I would also recommend a MIG for light welding, however a high end stick welder with fine controls and the right welding rods can do fabulus work as well. There are actually rods with ratings down to 20 amps that can weld down to 24gauge steel. One feature I would look for is the ability to alter polarity this makes all the diffrence in the world when performing out of position welding.
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  #15  
Old 12-06-2005, 09:00 PM
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I've never understood why you would switch polarity. can someone explain?
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