Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help




Go Back   PeachParts Mercedes-Benz Forum > Do It Yourself Links & Resources > Bodywork - Repair, Paint, Tools, Tips & Tricks

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-08-2019, 04:13 PM
Shadetree
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Back in SC upstate
Posts: 1,458
Rust discovered.

I just notice a few bubbles in the paint and decided to investigate. With a steel brush I removed enough paint to see the exterior damage.

Picture of the right rear quarter panel at the rear wheel well.

Inside I found a more insidious situation.

Which blasting media should I use to expose all the damage? Tips and tricks are appreciated.
Attached Thumbnails
Rust discovered.-rrqp-rust.jpg   Rust discovered.-rrqp-inside-rust.jpg  
__________________
84 300SD
85 380SE
83 528e
95 318ic

Last edited by Clemson88; 10-09-2019 at 05:19 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-08-2019, 10:32 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 125
I’ve used the miracle paint/fiberglass method which still holds up 2 years later.
__________________
Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-09-2019, 08:10 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 4,587
Ugh, that looks nasty! Good thing you caught it when you did.

Media blasting is a mixed bag.

Sand is the fastest, most efficient but it has its problems. It strips EVERYTHING from the area you are working. Paint, rust, thin sheet metal, weather stripping, sealant, rust preventative coating, you name it. An over exuberant application can also weaken the surrounding metal. It is a pain in the arse to clean all the media from the areas where it WILL infiltrate. The use of a good respirator system/device, goggles, gloves and head covering is a must! You definitely do not want to do this in an enclosed area such as a home work shop. You'll be cleaning the detritus from this for months and that includes orifices/wrinkles on your body you didn't realize you had.

Glass beading is the next most efficient method. Not as aggressive and not as harmful to existing metals/painted areas, etc. as the sand. Tends to leave a "mottled" surface. Same precautions need to be taken regarding protection. Clean up is a LITTLE easier, but not much.

Walnut shells are next. I'm not impressed with their rust removal properties but they do work. Much slower and not as efficient as the previous methods but it does have the advantage of the media being organic and if you happen to leave a mess in the yard, with the exception of the removed rust, paint, etc. , it will all wash away the next time it rains. Same safety precautions. Clean up is easier. Shop vac, compressed air nozzle and a little brush work will get 99% of the media from the work area. Easier to shower off also.

Soda blasting is last on my list. Most expensive and least effective cleaning heavily rusted areas. Does a great job removing paint without damaging the surrounding materials but that in itself speaks for its rust removal ability. It'll knock off the loose, flaky stuff but it doesn't do a good job on the deeper corrosion. Easiest to clean. Just hose it down and all the media dissolves. Give it a good blast of compressed air to get the water out of hidden areas and you're done.

Me? I wire brush to determine the extent of the corrosion and bead blast the rust. What I find after the beading determines my next step.
__________________
“Whatever story you're telling, it will be more interesting if, at the end you add, "and then everything burst into flames.”
― Brian P. Cleary, You Oughta Know By Now
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-09-2019, 01:40 PM
Shadetree
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Back in SC upstate
Posts: 1,458
I appreciate that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike D View Post
Ugh, that looks nasty! Good thing you caught it when you did.

Media blasting is a mixed bag.

Sand is the fastest, most efficient but it has its problems. It strips EVERYTHING from the area you are working. Paint, rust, thin sheet metal, weather stripping, sealant, rust preventative coating, you name it. An over exuberant application can also weaken the surrounding metal. It is a pain in the arse to clean all the media from the areas where it WILL infiltrate. The use of a good respirator system/device, goggles, gloves and head covering is a must! You definitely do not want to do this in an enclosed area such as a home work shop. You'll be cleaning the detritus from this for months and that includes orifices/wrinkles on your body you didn't realize you had.

Glass beading is the next most efficient method. Not as aggressive and not as harmful to existing metals/painted areas, etc. as the sand. Tends to leave a "mottled" surface. Same precautions need to be taken regarding protection. Clean up is a LITTLE easier, but not much.

Walnut shells are next. I'm not impressed with their rust removal properties but they do work. Much slower and not as efficient as the previous methods but it does have the advantage of the media being organic and if you happen to leave a mess in the yard, with the exception of the removed rust, paint, etc. , it will all wash away the next time it rains. Same safety precautions. Clean up is easier. Shop vac, compressed air nozzle and a little brush work will get 99% of the media from the work area. Easier to shower off also.

Soda blasting is last on my list. Most expensive and least effective cleaning heavily rusted areas. Does a great job removing paint without damaging the surrounding materials but that in itself speaks for its rust removal ability. It'll knock off the loose, flaky stuff but it doesn't do a good job on the deeper corrosion. Easiest to clean. Just hose it down and all the media dissolves. Give it a good blast of compressed air to get the water out of hidden areas and you're done.

Me? I wire brush to determine the extent of the corrosion and bead blast the rust. What I find after the beading determines my next step.
Lord willing, I'm just trying to remove enough off of the metal to see where to make the cuts that will eliminate all that rust. I intend to cut the sheet metal off my donor car and fit it properly without painting the entire body.

Will soda remove the coating on the interior?
__________________
84 300SD
85 380SE
83 528e
95 318ic
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-09-2019, 03:40 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 4,587
In that case, I wouldn't mess with media blasting. Use a chemical stripper to determine the extent of the rot.
__________________
“Whatever story you're telling, it will be more interesting if, at the end you add, "and then everything burst into flames.”
― Brian P. Cleary, You Oughta Know By Now
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old Today, 01:20 PM
Shadetree
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Back in SC upstate
Posts: 1,458
Chemical strippers 'ain't what the use to be,' but that might be the way to go. I have a few quarts I bought to strip the varnish off the interior wood trim left. None of it worked. Jasco, some Kleanstrip products and maybe one more.

I'll try it and let you know.
__________________
84 300SD
85 380SE
83 528e
95 318ic
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old Today, 02:23 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 4,587
I've had good luck with the Jasco line, even on the trim varnish.

The trick to the trim is coat it with a slime coat, bag it for a day, wipe it down, re-coat, bag, wait, scrape with a plastic or wood scraper, lather, rinse and repeat until the varnish is gone. Usually takes me four or more applications to get get rid of the stuff.

You'd think that something so hard to remove would last forever, wouldn't you?
__________________
“Whatever story you're telling, it will be more interesting if, at the end you add, "and then everything burst into flames.”
― Brian P. Cleary, You Oughta Know By Now
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2018 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Peach Parts or Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page