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  #1  
Old 07-13-2002, 10:17 PM
Emu Rancher
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 664
hooking up subs to my home stereo

My subs are out of my car for a little bit and I was just wondering if they could be hooked up to my shelf system at home somehow. The stereo has no subwoofer output just speaker outputs at 4 or 8 ohms.
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W126 1983 300SD 286,000 miles and ticking
Baby blue exterior Grey MB tex
Recent work:
Replaced air cleaner mounting brackets and heat shields
Replaced alternator, fan and power steering belts
Replaced positive battery terminal
Replaced negative battery terminal and cord
New Duralast Battery

My car needs work.
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  #2  
Old 07-14-2002, 07:36 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Utah!!
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Alot depends on how your home reciever is configured with inputs and outputs. But here's a few ideas from a long time stereo-tinkerer
If your subs have amps and low-pass crossovers already, you'll need a good solid source of 12 to 14 vdc. I've seen power supplies that can put out the watts needed to drive a car stereo amplifier at places like www.partsexpress.com. But they are kinda spendy. If you pull this together, then all you have to do is hook them up in parallel to your 'A' speakers.
If your subs are not powered, you need a low-pass crossover to send only the low frequencies to them from you home reciever. A problem doing it this way is that most home equipment wants 8ohms at their outputs, and hooking up subs in parallel to your existing speakers won't be real user-friendly to your reciever. But you could hook them up to the 'B' speaker out puts by them selves.
Another option is one I've used in the past. Hook up a graphic equalizer to the tape outputs, or pre-outs, of your reciever, run the equalizer outputs to the tape inputs or pre-in connections of another reciever, then hook that up to your subs. Set all the equalizer sliders above 150hz or so all the way down, and all the sliders below all the way up. It's kinda cheesy, but it doesn't work too bad. I knew a stereo repair tech that had his home stereo quad-amped this way with all equalizers, and it worked fairly well.
There are probably "expert" stereo techies out there that can give you more ideas. Good luck!
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  #3  
Old 07-17-2002, 04:41 PM
Emu Rancher
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 664
thanks a lo for the ideas;. I'll give em a ry.
__________________
W126 1983 300SD 286,000 miles and ticking
Baby blue exterior Grey MB tex
Recent work:
Replaced air cleaner mounting brackets and heat shields
Replaced alternator, fan and power steering belts
Replaced positive battery terminal
Replaced negative battery terminal and cord
New Duralast Battery

My car needs work.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-23-2002, 11:56 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Denver, Colorado
Posts: 91
Low pass passive crossover

Assuming you have a sub without it's own amplifier..........

Go to your local stereo repair or speaker shop and have them sell you a passive (Meaning no electronics!) low pass cross over. This will likely look like a coil of wire with two copper ends. Just wire it in line on the positive side of your speaker wiring. With your sub, you will want to have it start rolling off about 100 or 150 HZ, and it will likely only do about 6db per octave. This means it won't attenuate frequencies above the 100 or 150HZ very quickly, but for your temporary purposes, that doesn't matter much. Don't let them sell you fancier devices - they really aren't necessary. A basic "coil" should be a few bucks!

But watch your amp. If you have power meters, watch them carefully - you will be surprised how much more power low frequencies require to produce than higher. If you don't have power meters, make sure the amp doesn't overheat. If the resistance of the sub is low (Less than 4 OHMS.) the amp may not even run it. (It also depends on your main speakers.) Some amps have safety circuitry that will protect it in case of over loading. If the receiver doesn't work at all after plugging the sub in, that's probably what's happening.

Good luck!
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'93 400E Now DEAD - Rear ended and totalled.
Replaced by '02 C32 AMG - FAST!
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