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  #16  
Old 12-20-2005, 11:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmaysob
yea it does make them last longer. but the down side is the are a b*tch to cut. when we would turn a set that had been treated, we would go trough all three sides of a bit on one rotor.
Well yeah. That would be a side effect. But the rotors should not warp which is why one needs to turn. If they do warp you need to toss them and maybe hit up the treater for money. Any cutting or drilling probably would need to be done before they are treated.
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Last edited by DieselJim; 12-20-2005 at 12:06 PM.
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  #17  
Old 12-20-2005, 07:07 PM
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OK well ill check everything you guys said to check. fluids and everything else. But i do want to replace the rotors mainly because they look very worn and they are the original rotors from 20+ years ago.

thanks guys
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  #18  
Old 12-20-2005, 08:08 PM
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Rebuild To Specs

Breaks are one thing that I know for sure. I'm an ASE Break Tech.

What you need to do first off is inspect your current breaks. The easiest thing to do is feel the edge of the rotor and feel for a raised lip. If you have a lip you will need to have your rotors turned. That said, if they are 20 years old then you most likely have that lip and are most likely under the minimum spec. you can take a micrometer and measure the rotor. Measure it in 3 or 4 places because it might be warped. If you have a book on your car, or go to the parts store they will tell you what the minimum measurement is. It is sometimes stamped into the rotor, I cane remember if Mercedes did this or not... you might have to convert it to inches if you are using an inch micrometer.

There are 2 different minimum numbers depending on manufacture, I can't remember which type Mercedes has, but it’s easy to understand. There is a minimum "cut too" number meaning that if it’s larger then that your ok, and you can have them cut to that measurement. And a minimum "discard" measurement. Meaning if it below that number toss the rotor. And you can have it cut to within +15 thousandths of the discard number. You’ll find one of these numbers.

Measure your rotor before you take it to the machine shop/parts store/break shop. Will save you some time having some one else measures it.

If the rotor can't be cut because it is to thin, then you need to buy new ones. I have no experience with the rotor you have picked, but it seems to have a good reputation. If you are picking a new rotor the basic rules I use are, is it made in American? German? It better be made in one of those places or its pretty much junk. The rotors made in china and other developing countries are built to specs. And will work, but the refinement of the steel just isn't there and you'll be changing you rotors sooner then you would with a quality rotor. I primarily use Raybestos; they have a good price per quality.

Replace your bearings and your seals. Be sure to pack the grease into the rotors. And change all bearings races.

Change your pads.

You should change your break fluid. It is suppose to be changed ever 2 years. Break fluid is free of water. So it will suck it out of the air with time. This will cause rust and other problems that can cause break line clogs. Bleed your breaks with a clear tube connected to the bleeder and look at the color. Keep bleeding it till you see the color change from root beer, to Champaign. Keep you master cylinder full. Bleed from Right Rear, Left Rear, Front Right, and Front Left. Working your way closer to the master cylinder.

This might sound stupid, but I was taught in high school auto to pour fluid in the master cylinder and then pump the peddle till it stiffens up. That a bad idea. So as I said this might sound like I’m stating the obvious, but some teachers don't do this correctly. Have one person in the car and one on the floor. The guy on the floor cracks the bleeder, then tells the guy in the car to put the peddle to the floor, and then the guy in the car tells him when it’s down and the guy at the bottom closed the bleeder. Then the guy lets the peddle up... sorry for sounding like a know it all. But bleeding is fast and easy this way.

With new pads and rotors you will stop hard and square. I changed all my breaks (all 4 rotors, all pads, and the parking shoes in the back rotors) last year and it made driving a lot better.

I probably said too much... but a quality break job was never spelled out to me till I took the class in college. So I thought I’d spared the knowledge.

Nik
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  #19  
Old 12-20-2005, 08:37 PM
Craig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greasybenz
But i do want to replace the rotors mainly because they look very worn and they are the original rotors from 20+ years ago.
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  #20  
Old 12-20-2005, 11:08 PM
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SirNik84 MB brake rotors are very soft and will have a lip within a few thousand miles. At less then 20k miles my discs already have a healthy lip. Thats why they usually only last 2-3 sets of pads.

Very nice write up though!
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  #21  
Old 12-21-2005, 01:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SirNik84
Breaks are one thing that I know for sure. I'm an ASE Break Tech.
What is a break?
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But what do I know...

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  #22  
Old 12-21-2005, 04:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DieselJim
Well yeah. That would be a side effect. But the rotors should not warp which is why one needs to turn. If they do warp you need to toss them and maybe hit up the treater for money. Any cutting or drilling probably would need to be done before they are treated.

o they can still warp. treating them is to reduce not stop warpage and chewed up disks. it does make a noticeable diff. though. alot of people have things like cylinder heads ,valves and pistons treaed this way.
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  #23  
Old 12-21-2005, 09:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmaysob
o they can still warp. treating them is to reduce not stop warpage and chewed up disks. it does make a noticeable diff. though. alot of people have things like cylinder heads ,valves and pistons treaed this way.
I'm sure they do warp. Some of the sales people with websites suggested they would be less prone to severe warping and fast chewing. I agree it only slows and reduces these processes. It doesn't eliminate. I am wonder what cold tempering would do the the structure of aluminum heads. Not sure it would be quite as dramatic a difference as with steel.
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My Daily : 96 E-300 Diesel with 195,000 miles
Retired: 92 300D 2.5 T 345K miles and for sale
Retired: 95 E320 157K miles and currently parked with blown engine

Both retired cars are for sale as is my w124 shop inventory

Last edited by DieselJim; 12-21-2005 at 09:22 AM.
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  #24  
Old 12-25-2005, 11:14 PM
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so did you ever purchase those rotors? if so what did you think?
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  #25  
Old 12-26-2005, 12:16 AM
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Drilling brake rotors, cutting grooves for the "gas" to escape, etc. all sounds nice but doesn't do a thing for braking power.

Total swept area contributes to stopping power. You can buy a good set of rotors for this car for about $36 (ATE) that will last just fine. I got 100,000 miles out of my front rotors on a 95 model E300D.

Don't go looking for fancy solutions to basic problems. You're just making some marketing person rich.
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  #26  
Old 12-26-2005, 12:35 AM
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Please read the following thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RUN-EM
Onna another Benz, I put new rotors and porterfield pads. And at the suggestion of Jerry Jones at FORMYMERCEDES.COM treated the disc with the cryogenic freeze bath. This re-orients the molecular structure of the disc. NASCAR does it on all their race cars. The result is that you will have much less dusting on the wheels and superior braking ability. Oh, yeah, on that car, I just have to clean and rewax the wheels about once each year. And it is so easy to clean them.....no scrubbing. Just soap them up and wash off.

Regards

Run-em
Please read the following thread.

Boy, that's cold hearted.
http://www.peachparts.com/shopforum/diesel-discussion/124732-boy-thats-cold-hearted-post1052015.html#post1052015
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  #27  
Old 12-26-2005, 12:39 AM
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I just sit here and laugh. One guy heats the rotors to change them magically, another guy freezes them.

I remember a company in Ohio called Summit Racing who would sell you something to insulate your headers to keep them hotter longer, then, on the next page of the catalog, another product to keep your headers cooler!

This crap is about the marketing dollars folks. That's all.
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  #28  
Old 12-26-2005, 12:58 AM
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Your spell check is changing what you are saying.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SirNik84
Brakes are one thing that I know for sure. I'm an ASE Brake Tech.

What you need to do first off is inspect your current brakes. The easiest thing to do is feel the edge of the rotor and feel for a raised lip. If you have a lip you will need to have your rotors turned. That said, if they are 20 years old then you most likely have that lip and are most likely under the minimum spec. you can take a micrometer and measure the rotor. Measure it in 3 or 4 places because it might be warped. If you have a book on your car, or go to the parts store they will tell you what the minimum measurement is. It is sometimes stamped into the rotor, I can't remember if Mercedes did this or not... you might have to convert it to inches if you are using an inch micrometer.

There are 2 different minimum numbers depending on manufacture, I can't remember which type Mercedes has, but itís easy to understand. There is a minimum "cut too" number meaning that if itís larger then that your OK, and you can have them cut to that measurement. And a minimum "discard" measurement. Meaning if it below that number toss the rotor. And you can have it cut to within +15 thousandths of the discard number. Youíll find one of these numbers.

Measure your rotor before you take it to the machine shop/parts store/brake shop. Will save you some time having some one else measures it.

If the rotor can't be cut because it is to thin, then you need to buy new ones. I have no experience with the rotor you have picked, but it seems to have a good reputation. If you are picking a new rotor the basic rules I use are, is it made in America? Germany? It better be made in one of those places or its pretty much junk. The rotors made in china and other developing countries are built to specs. And will work, but the refinement of the steel just isn't there and you'll be changing you rotors sooner then you would with a quality rotor. I primarily use ©Raybestosģ; they have a good price per quality.

Replace your bearings and your seals. Be sure to pack the grease into the rotors. And change all bearings races.

Change your pads.

You should change your brake fluid. It is suppose to be changed ever 2 years. Brake fluid is free of water. So it will suck it out of the air with time. This will cause rust and other problems that can cause brake line clogs. Bleed your brakes with a clear tube connected to the bleeder and look at the color. Keep bleeding it till you see the color change from root beer, to Champaign. Keep you master cylinder full. Bleed from Right Rear, Left Rear, Front Right, and Front Left. Working your way closer to the master cylinder.

This might sound stupid, but I was taught in high school auto to pour fluid in the master cylinder and then pump the peddle till it stiffens up. That a bad idea. So as I said this might sound like Iím stating the obvious, but some teachers don't do this correctly. Have one person in the car and one on the floor. The guy on the floor cracks the bleeder, then tells the guy in the car to put the peddle to the floor, and then the guy in the car tells him when itís down and the guy at the bottom closed the bleeder. Then the guy lets the peddle up... sorry for sounding like a know it all. But bleeding is fast and easy this way.

With new pads and rotors you will stop hard and square. I changed all my brakes (all 4 rotors, all pads, and the parking shoes in the back rotors) last year and it made driving a lot better.

I probably said too much... but a quality brake job was never spelled out to me till I took the class in college. So I thought Iíd share the knowledge.

Nik
Hello Nik
Your spell check is changing what you are saying.
breaks when you mean Brakes, I edited this to read correctly, but your original still looks very odd.



Brake flush every two years?! U'r kidding right?
Brake flush every two years?! U'r kidding right?

Why should I flush my brake fluid every year, you ask?
http://www.peachparts.com/shopforum/diesel-discussion/38856-why-should-i-flush-my-brake-fluid-every-year-you-ask.html#post220599

Power Bleeder or what?
http://www.peachparts.com/shopforum/diesel-discussion/103226-power-bleeder-what.html#post707359

Brake bleeder - power bleeder Homemade
Brake bleeder - power bleeder Homemade
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  #29  
Old 12-26-2005, 01:04 AM
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I can buy 20 sets of "China" rotors for one set of "premium" rotors.

I'm sticking with good ole' China rotors.
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  #30  
Old 12-26-2005, 01:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tony1963
I can buy 20 sets of "China" rotors for one set of "premium" rotors.

I'm sticking with good ole' China rotors.
have fun, they warp alot quicker too
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