Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help



Go Back   PeachParts Mercedes-Benz Forum > Mercedes-Benz Tech Information and Support > Diesel Discussion

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-09-2006, 08:15 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 3
Talking need your help

I am looking to buy a 124 diesel; do the 300d (2.5) and the later e300 have the same 5 cylinder engine? I currently have a "92 400e and the gas is killing me ( about 175 miles a day). Is this a good choice? I drove a "91 2.5 and slow pick up was an issue in the one I drove (197k).

Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-09-2006, 09:56 AM
LarryBible
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
You don't give any indication of what kind of driving you do, freeway or city, nor do you say how much gas the 400e uses.

Making some rough assumptions though:

400e at 17MPG with 175 miles per day X 20 days in month = 3500 miles per month. / 17MPG = 206 gallons per month at say 2.50 per gallon gives a $514 per month fuel bill.

300d at 28MPG with the same 175 miles X 20 days =3500 miles per month / 28MPG = 125 gallons of more expensive 2.75 per gallon diesel = $344 per month fuel bill. That is a fuel savings of $170 per month.

These numbers are rough because of LOTS of assumptions, however even with fuel prices being different in your area, it gives you an idea of your fuel savings. NOW, can you afford to trade, buy and sell cars, take a risk on getting a car with some problems for $170 per month?

Back in the last fuel crunch of the early seventies I saw the same kind of irrational thinking. It was common to see someone with a car that was paid off and in good shape, go trade, take on a car payment or pay a BUNCH of money out of pocket, just to pick up 10MPG without EVER stopping to do the math.

Another hidden issue is the fact that during times like these you are selling a car that is not so fuel efficient at a time when such cars are bringing their lowest resale and buying a more fuel stingy car at a time when they are going at a premium. This has even MORE effect on the cost of such a change.

My advice is to ALWAYS look at the big picture. Fuel cost is only ONE cost of running a vehicle. Look at ALL costs of running a vehicle and then compare the two bottom lines, not just fuel cost.

In the seventies MANY of the muscle cars ended up with an early trip to the wrecking yard because of people making short term decisions based SOLELY on fuel cost. Those cars just a few years later were worth a LOT, and now are worth a FORTUNE. In years to come a 400E will be a premium car to find.

Good luck,
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-09-2006, 10:20 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Blue Point, NY
Posts: 25,396
Quote:
Originally Posted by eflitzer
I am looking to buy a 124 diesel; do the 300d (2.5) and the later e300 have the same 5 cylinder engine? I currently have a "92 400e and the gas is killing me ( about 175 miles a day). Is this a good choice? I drove a "91 2.5 and slow pick up was an issue in the one I drove (197k).
The 300d (2.5) has the five cylinder OM602 engine.

The later e300D (1995) has the six cylinder OM606 engine, n/a.

Either vehicle will return good fuel economy on the highway.........better than 30 mpg.........but you also must weigh the cost of diesel fuel against gasoline now.

Neither one will be impressive to you regarding acceleration........especially when compared to a 400e.

So, you have to make a decision.........speed costs money.........how much do you want to save??
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-09-2006, 11:26 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada.
Posts: 6,510
Larry Bible makes some sound points as usual. I want to add my perspective having been there as well.Sometimes it is wise to look at the overall situation. Too much driving plus the time incurred to accomplish it plus the inherrent risk factor are just a few items that have to be examined as well. Sometimes if a long term situation is envisioned it is better to move. Once years ago I switched employers for more money. The trade off was the excess comuting that eventually got on my back plus the true cost per mile of operating a vehicle that much. But the real turnoff was the loss of all that time five days a week. Sold my house and moved closer to job eventually. Not everyones solution of course and not possible in some situations but is an avenue to explore. The price fuel costs is nowhere near your true cost of all that driving but actually only a very small percentage. A lot of guys land up old eventually and cannot comprehend why they have no money. They had it but unknowingly disposed of it by not really understanding the true costs of the things they do.. But like myself if you drive that way long enough you will probably witness some accidents. Just hope you are not in one of them yourself. I once have had a car pass me on it's roof. Another went in the median and emerged broadside in front of me when I was doing 70 or so. Just missed him by good circumstance more than by any other factor. Scary stuff. There were lesser incidences. If you must drive high milage long term do the real overall math. Most memorial for me were driving through white outs about every two years or so. They left an imprint on my mind that I wish was not there. A reallly good white out once in a lifetime is more than anyone should want to start with. You might even find religious beliefs again before you get out of the other side. To be fair though you probably have to have been in one to understand and thats only if you live. Just remember do not stop as the guy behind you will probably get you then theres the problem as well if someone has stopped in front of you. You will never see him at all before impact. Plus the added issue that it does not have to snowing to have a white out. If it is not snowing around you or snow is not blowing but you see that senario in front of you and it looks like heavy fog. Pull over and stop until you identify what it is. You can drive right up to the leading edge usually in good weather by the way. That is unless you feel comforatable driving in a giant cotton ball with the only external refference being feeling the gravel edge of the road by tire noise differential and praying that someone in there is not stopped or a pile up exists ahead of you. . You really cannot even see the front of your hood. This is excess though as you may live in a region it does not even snow. Perhaps I should not have gone into it this much but they are some of my life experiences that perhaps a another person could reflect upon and be smarter than I was.


Last edited by barry123400; 03-09-2006 at 11:52 AM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2018 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Peach Parts or Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page