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  #1  
Old 10-31-2007, 06:50 PM
Dan Arnold
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Saratoga Springs, NY
Posts: 32
Name of a part?

Does anyone know the name of the the engine shut off switch powered by a vacuum line located behind the injection pump on a 1980 240d?
Thanks Dan,
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  #2  
Old 10-31-2007, 08:53 PM
whunter's Avatar
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Answer:

Vehicle: 1980 Mercedes Benz 240D
Part: Shut Off Valve
-------------------------------------------
Shut Off Valve
At Injection Pump
Pulls injection pump rack to stop. Requires (2) 001 074 20 80 gaskets.





You need to read this....

Run away diesel, why does it happen?
Run away diesel, why does it happen?
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  #3  
Old 11-01-2007, 01:36 PM
Dan Arnold
 
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Could I stop a run away diesel by stalling it if it is a standard transmission?
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Old 11-01-2007, 01:56 PM
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Shove something over the air intake, would probably be my best guess. Stalling a runaway seems like a good way to really hurt something.

Also, what about the stop lever?
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  #5  
Old 11-01-2007, 02:45 PM
300SDog's Avatar
gimme a low-tech 240D
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darnold4014 View Post
Could I stop a run away diesel by stalling it if it is a standard transmission?
Yep, you can shut down 4-spd 240D stalling the car in 3rd or 4th standing still if yer too damned cheap'n lazy to fix vacuum shutoff valve, probly an easy install $8 junkyard part. Risk early death of throwout bearing and or snapping clutch disc springs.
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  #6  
Old 11-01-2007, 03:11 PM
Dan Arnold
 
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Location: Saratoga Springs, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DieselDog View Post
Yep, you can shut down 4-spd 240D stalling the car in 3rd or 4th standing still if yer too damned cheap'n lazy to fix vacuum shutoff valve, probly an easy install $8 junkyard part. Risk early death of throwout bearing and or snapping clutch disc springs.
I am talking about stalling the car if for some reason after I replace the shut off valve it becomes a runaway.
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  #7  
Old 11-01-2007, 03:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darnold4014 View Post
I am talking about stalling the car if for some reason after I replace the shut off valve it becomes a runaway.
You can either slam a phone book over the intake {air cleaner removed of course} or have a 17mm wrench handy to loosen injector lines.....
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  #8  
Old 11-01-2007, 05:34 PM
seo seo is offline
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Runaway

I think the term "runaway" is being misused here. Runaway is a problem that's most common on 2-stroke diesels. Detroit 71, Cleveland 278, and even EMD engines would occasionally do it. A high-hour engine running hot would start sucking lube oil up past the rings and combusting it. Shutting off the injection would not stop it, because the engine was running on its own oil. It would run faster and faster, without the governor being able to control top engine rpm, until it threw a rod out through the side of the block.
Detroit Diesels actually have a special emergency air shutter that is used to cut off air in the event of a runaway. On older engines this was controlled by an operator-actuated lever. On newer ones, the governor would trip it at a certain overspeed.
This was not a big deal in a truck, where you were well isolated from the engine. An entirely different thing in the engineroom of a tug with a runaway EMD 645-20 (That's a Vee-20 engine, each cylinder displacing 645 cubic inches). When one of those throws a rod the shrapnel from the crankbase can hurt you very badly. Which is scarier than a base explosion, or a stack fire, or any of the two-stroke diesel excitements that make life amusing.

Anyway, if an engine starts to run away for any reason, it's best to keep it in gear so that you can use the brakes to keep the engine from overspeeding. It shouldn't hurt the throwout bearing or pilot bearing(the clutch is engaged), and your brakes have far more power than your engine does. (No fooling. Think of how much faster your brakes can go 60-0 than your engine can go 0-60.) If the engine is running off its fuel, it can't put out more power than 100% injection, and the drivetrain is engineered to handle that amount of power. If it's running off its lube oil, its power at any given rpm is limited by the amount of air it can get.

Hope that makes some sense.

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  #9  
Old 11-02-2007, 06:48 PM
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Answer:

My concern for stalling with the clutch = perfect New flywheel, clutch, pressure plate, and brakes will take the strain, and stall the engine.
A clutch disc and/or pressure plate or brakes near end of life may fail + not stall the engine.


I make this issue very clear in the "Run away diesel" thread.
The diesel is running on unregulated engine crank case oil = will not stop until it seizes, catastrophically breaks or is empty.
Opening the injector lines will have zero affect on a true run away diesel engine.

Please read this thread for your own protection.

Run away diesel, why does it happen?
Run away diesel, why does it happen?
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