Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help




Go Back   PeachParts Mercedes ShopForum > Technical Information and Support > Diesel Discussion

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-11-2008, 10:41 PM
zeke's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: The Alamo City, TEXAS
Posts: 1,189
AC diagnosis- leaking internal compressor seal

The quote for repair was ~$900

I am deciding whether to attempt this myself or bite the bullet.

The FSM says I need a pressing off plate for the compressor (109 589 00 25 00) and a holding device (116 589 14 31 00). Do I? How much and where do I get them?


The cost of parts (o-ring seal kit, compressor, dryer) appears to be about $300 without the R-12. I asked if I could bring in my own parts and they said no. So I am either DIMyself or obviously paying retail for the parts. (They said shop time was 2.5 hours).

There are only a few threads here documenting replacing the compressor, and dieselgiant's site is kinda daunting (it took him hours to reattach the new compressor).

So what do people think...should I try it or go to the shop?

I have replaced an axle, water pump, refurbished the instrument cluster, done the valves, fixed the central locking system, and other more routine stuff, so I have some abilities, but I am a but intimidated by AC.

P.S. this is the wagon
__________________

Current Mercedes
1979 maple yellow 240D 4-speed


Gone and fondly remembered:
1980 orient red 240D 4-speed

Gone and NOT fondly remembered:
1982 Chna Blue 300TD

Other car in the stable:
2013 VW Jetta Sportwagen TDI / 6-speed MT
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-11-2008, 11:09 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 8,344
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeke View Post
So I am either DIMyself or obviously paying retail for the parts.
Maybe you could do a "hybrid" DIY. You replace all the parts at home, then get a shop to evacuate and fill the system. That way, you can buy your own parts but not have to buy a vacuum pump, manifold set, leak detector, etc.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-12-2008, 08:19 PM
NoSparkNeeded's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 506
Compressor

I changed out my compressor in about an hour. That was where
I was leaking from. If you have an R4 compressor, I'd say most
components fail in a similar way so it's likely that your compressor
seal is bad. I didn't find it all that hard to change out. I had to lie
on the ground and work over my head, but other than the pain,
it was easy. I'm going to do my wife's SD next week. The compressor
is where I'll START this time. Pump it down and see if it leaks overnite.
THEN I'll replace all the orings.
__________________
85 300TD FED-Daily
84 300SD-Wife's
86 XJS-Sunday
66 GMC-Work- Given to my stepson
83 BMW Airhead- Given to my stepson
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-12-2008, 08:22 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 2,156
Quote:
Originally Posted by tangofox007 View Post
Maybe you could do a "hybrid" DIY. You replace all the parts at home, then get a shop to evacuate and fill the system. That way, you can buy your own parts but not have to buy a vacuum pump, manifold set, leak detector, etc.
You can evacute and charge the ac system yourself if you have a macs license and know someone who has r12 freon and charging and evac station.
__________________
1986 300SDL, 211K,Dealership serviced its whole life
1991 190E 2.6(120k)
1983 300D(300k)
1977 300D(211k)
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-12-2008, 08:40 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 8,344
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oracle12345 View Post
You can evacute and charge the ac system yourself if you have a macs license and know someone who has r12 freon and charging and evac station.
I am guessing that if Zeke was that well "connected" he would not have gone to a shop that wanted to charge him $900 for the job. Reckon?
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-12-2008, 09:07 PM
zeke's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: The Alamo City, TEXAS
Posts: 1,189
Quote:
Originally Posted by tangofox007 View Post
I am guessing that if Zeke was that well "connected" he would not have gone to a shop that wanted to charge him $900 for the job. Reckon?


So if I install the compressor and dryer, then take it to someone who will evac and fill it -
assuming I do it right and it holds vacuum, then they refill it (with r12 and oil), I am good right?
__________________

Current Mercedes
1979 maple yellow 240D 4-speed


Gone and fondly remembered:
1980 orient red 240D 4-speed

Gone and NOT fondly remembered:
1982 Chna Blue 300TD

Other car in the stable:
2013 VW Jetta Sportwagen TDI / 6-speed MT

Last edited by zeke; 07-12-2008 at 09:14 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-12-2008, 09:47 PM
NoSparkNeeded's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 506
Yes

If you do that and it holds a vac, you are good to go. I was using
R22 to diagnose, but my Harbor Freight sniffer did not find anything
around all the other joints. I just figured (hoped) it would be the compressor. Changed out the expansion valve and the R/D, vacced
it down. It held 29 over night.Re-charged and all is well since Thurs.
__________________
85 300TD FED-Daily
84 300SD-Wife's
86 XJS-Sunday
66 GMC-Work- Given to my stepson
83 BMW Airhead- Given to my stepson
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-12-2008, 11:21 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 8,344
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoSparkNeeded View Post
If you do that and it holds a vac, you are good to go.
Not so fast. Although it's a good start, here is no guarantee that a system that holds a vacuum will be leak free under pressure. (The operating pressures can easily exceed the vacuum differential by a factor of twenty.)

Any A/C shop should be able to leak test the system and take corrective action as required, which usually consists of tightening fittings. The one significant exception would be problem with a stepped port compressor, which sometimes are a challenge to get sealed well. Also, I would recommend replacing the expansion valve, in addition to the other items mentioned. Along with the remaining o-rings at the otherwise untouched connections, like the condenser and suction line.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-13-2008, 12:19 AM
zeke's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: The Alamo City, TEXAS
Posts: 1,189
Ok, so I put the compressor in, then I put the drier in - how long do I have to get the system evacuated and filled before the drier takes on enough water to ruin it?

Do I flush with everything in line, then seal it up and race over to the AC shop -

If there are other leaks (either at the fittings or another place like the evaporater) , am I going to have to buy another drier?
__________________

Current Mercedes
1979 maple yellow 240D 4-speed


Gone and fondly remembered:
1980 orient red 240D 4-speed

Gone and NOT fondly remembered:
1982 Chna Blue 300TD

Other car in the stable:
2013 VW Jetta Sportwagen TDI / 6-speed MT
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-13-2008, 12:49 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 4,263
You need to evacuate the system immediately after connecting the new dryer, if possible. See if you can borrow a vacuum pump to do that, if you need to take it elsewhere for charging.

As for flushing, do it right or don't do it at all. I would recommend flushing any system if it's old and is going to be opened. You must remove the TXV to flush the evaporator. Flushing needs to be followed by purging with a lot of dry air. The compressor must be flushed with the appropriate oil only and never any solvents.

I flushed everything in my system except the condenser, dryer and TXV which I replaced. My condenser is a parallel-flow unit and these are very hard to flush and purge. With a tube-and-fin design, flushing would be easy.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 07-13-2008, 12:53 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 8,344
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt L View Post
The compressor must be flushed with the appropriate oil only and never any solvents.
There is absolutely no need to flush a brand new compressor!!!
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 07-13-2008, 07:17 PM
NoSparkNeeded's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 506
Flushing

I'm no expert, but unless you have had a compressor failure or you are
going to switch to 134a, I would not do a flush. To do it properly is a
PITA. I switched my Jag to 134a. The flush procedure was time consuming
and difficult. I'd just change the compressor and the R/D, if you want to
increase your chance of success replace all the O-rings and the expansion valve. I did all that for under 300.00. At that point I vacced for 4hrs. and charged. You could just take it to the shop and have them do the vac and charge. I'd have them put dye in as well, just in case. They could also sniffer it after the charge. That might save you some money.
__________________
85 300TD FED-Daily
84 300SD-Wife's
86 XJS-Sunday
66 GMC-Work- Given to my stepson
83 BMW Airhead- Given to my stepson
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 07-13-2008, 07:24 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 4,263
Quote:
Originally Posted by tangofox007 View Post
There is absolutely no need to flush a brand new compressor!!!
True. But I did not want to leave the impression that you could use solvents to flush a used compressor.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 07-13-2008, 08:06 PM
zeke's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: The Alamo City, TEXAS
Posts: 1,189
If both a remanufactured or new aftermarket compressor have the same (12 month) warranty, are both equal?

I know tht is hard to answer, but it seems like the reman. process is pretty thorough.

and the price difference is substantial.
__________________

Current Mercedes
1979 maple yellow 240D 4-speed


Gone and fondly remembered:
1980 orient red 240D 4-speed

Gone and NOT fondly remembered:
1982 Chna Blue 300TD

Other car in the stable:
2013 VW Jetta Sportwagen TDI / 6-speed MT
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 07-13-2008, 08:41 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 8,344
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoSparkNeeded View Post
I'm no expert, but unless you have had a compressor failure or you are
going to switch to 134a, I would not do a flush.
Failing to flush the system will typically void the warranty on a new compressor. Probably for good reason.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2011 Pelican Parts - Posts may be archived for display on the Peach Parts or Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page