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  #16  
Old 11-10-2008, 05:59 PM
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How timely.
I just did this job last night. My driver side motor mount was obliterated...came out with the two metal parts separated.

I have this pipe that I used to slide over the allen keys to make for a longer lever arm...also slides on over a ratchet nicely. That pipe has proven itself my most valuable tool over time.
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  #17  
Old 11-10-2008, 06:41 PM
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To add to the previous hints, sometimes the hole spacing for the two allen bolts in some aftermarket replacement engine mounts aren't drilled exactly right. you get a situation where you can get one of the twp allen bolts started into the crossmember, but then the other bolt wants to crossthread. You may need to slightly enlarge or elongate one or both mounting holes in the mount with a drill in order to make the mount fit.

Happy Motoring, Mark
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  #18  
Old 11-23-2008, 05:54 PM
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I have a 1980 240D and will be replacing the motor mounts soon also. 2 questions:
1) Does the 240 also have engine shocks?
2) Does heavier vibration when in reverse with the brake applied, indicate trans mount, or is this just a result of lower RPM harmonics?
Thanks.
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  #19  
Old 11-23-2008, 06:10 PM
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The manual 240Ds do not and, as I remember the autos do.
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1985 Euro 300TD 5 spd 218K
1985 Euro 240D 5 spd 120K
1979 240D 5 spd, 40K on engine rebuild
1994 Dodge/Cummins, 5 spd, 121K
1964 Allice Chalmers D15 tractor
2014 Kubota L3800 tractor
1964 VW bug

Giving money and power to government is like giving whiskey and car keys to teenage boys. P.J. O'Rourke
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  #20  
Old 11-23-2008, 11:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wahip View Post
I have a 1980 240D and will be replacing the motor mounts soon also. 2 questions:
1) Does the 240 also have engine shocks?
2) Does heavier vibration when in reverse with the brake applied, indicate trans mount, or is this just a result of lower RPM harmonics?
Thanks.
My '82 240D automatic has an engine shock next to the driver's side motor mount.
I think vibrations on these can be a harmonic issue, as I've replaced both motor mounts and the tranny mount and it still vibrates when idling in gear. in my case, raising the idle speed a bit helped.

Happy Motoring, Mark
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  #21  
Old 12-29-2008, 10:27 AM
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Thanks ...

Undertaking this fix in the AM ... Wanted to thank all that contributed, and hopefully made my life a little easier!
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  #22  
Old 12-29-2008, 11:59 AM
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no shock 80 240d improvement

Hi, when I replaced the motor mounts on my manual tranny 80 240d I found the manual showed shock mounts and I didn't have them. I didn't want to put short (25mm length) allen bolts up through the frame as my car was delivered to me, because if the hex head strips out, they would be a ***** to drill out buried in the frame. I made anti-shock pads of 1 1/2" rubber blocks (chair caster mount blocks, actually), put them below the frame, and bolted the new motor mounts down with 100+ mm length "GM starter bolts" from the "Help" line at the local auto supply. (Use a fender washer under the head). When I posted this improvement on this site, my post was deleted within 24 hours. 3 years later, my homemade shock mounts are still working fine. When I put the new motor mounts in, I found the holes didn't line up, and I don't like wallowing out mount holes too much. I loosened the transmission mount, and used 2 screw scissors jacks I bought at goodwill against the firewall and the ground to push the motor around until the holes line up. MAKE SURE YOUR CAR IS STABLE ON RAILROAD TIES IF YOU DO THIS, NO JACKSTANDS. Use a board between the jack and sheet metal to prevent bending.
The caster the rubber blocks come from is Mcmaster Carr 2356T11, mcmaster.com. Stacks of high durometer rubber belting should work too, drill the hole with a wood bit.
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  #23  
Old 12-29-2008, 01:00 PM
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I've never had a problem with the large allen mount bolts but I have run into stripped out small alens, both times on the driver side. As far as "striped out bolt removal" projects, its pretty easy from underneath. Most of the time I think the jobs goes without a hitch, just clean out the allen heads good before turning.
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1985 Euro 300TD 5 spd 218K
1985 Euro 240D 5 spd 120K
1979 240D 5 spd, 40K on engine rebuild
1994 Dodge/Cummins, 5 spd, 121K
1964 Allice Chalmers D15 tractor
2014 Kubota L3800 tractor
1964 VW bug

Giving money and power to government is like giving whiskey and car keys to teenage boys. P.J. O'Rourke
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  #24  
Old 12-30-2008, 02:47 PM
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stripped Allen head bolts

I'm a food plant mechanic, I have stripped out dozens of Allen head bolts, both with pro grade Bondhus® ball head wrench's, also Proto brand Allen adapters.
The most successful procedure is to soak the bolt with penetrating oil, install a Proto socket adapter attached to an air impact gun, heat the steel around the bolt, re-oil,check gun direction, pull the gun trigger.
In a food plant where caustic and acids are used to clean, the bolt head strips 1/3 the time.
I also lived on the gulf coast as a youth, there was a higher percentage to stuck bolts on my car due to salt.
Allen head bolts are harder than "high speed" drill bits, if you try to drill with that you may have to resharpen a couple of times.
Cobalt drill bits that are hard enough drill Allen bolt steel in one pass run about $30 in the 9/16" size.
It takes a lot of chest strength to drill a 9/16 dia bolt head, you'll get no weight advantage drilling up from the floor.
I don't have this chest strength, beefy guys can drill a big bolt off in 1/10 the time of wimps like me.
Mostly when Allen head bolts strip we tried to cut the head off with a die grinder, but you can't do that on a bolt head buried in a frame rail.
Oh by the way, my chair caster shock absorbers make the engine vibration acceptable to me.
If you have multiple cars, taking the shock absorbers off another car is a fine idea.

Last edited by whunter; 05-19-2010 at 08:38 PM. Reason: technical spelling
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  #25  
Old 12-30-2008, 04:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IndianaJo View Post
I'm a food plant mechanic, I have stripped out dozens of allen head bolts, both with pro grade Bonrus ball head wrenchs, also Proto brand allen adapters. The most succesful procedure is to soak the bolt with penetrating oil, install a Proto socket adapter attached to an air impact gun, heat the steel around the bolt, re-oil,check gun direction, pull the gun trigger. In a food plant where caustic and acids are used to clean, the bolt head strips 1/3 the time. I also lived on the gulf coast as a youth, there was a higher percentage to stuck bolts on my car due to salt. Allen head bolts are harder than "high speed" drill bits, if you try to drill with that you may have to resharpen a couple of times. Cobalt drill bits that are hard enough drill allen bolt steel in one pass run about $30 in the 9/16" size. It takes a lot of chest strength to drill a 9/16 dia bolt head, you'll get no weight advantage drilling up from the floor. I don't have this chest strength, beefy guys can drill a big bolt off in 1/10 the time of wimps like me. Mostly when allen head bolts strip we tried to cut the head off with a die grinder, but you can't do that on a bolt head buried in a frame rail.
Oh by the way, my chair caster shock absorbers make the engine vibration acceptable to me. If you have multiple cars, taking the shock absorbers off another car is a fine idea.
Thanks for the info. Could you go over this part again? "install a Proto socket adapter attached to an air impact gun" I found the adaptor for around $8 but can't quite see the procedure
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1985 Euro 300TD 5 spd 218K
1985 Euro 240D 5 spd 120K
1979 240D 5 spd, 40K on engine rebuild
1994 Dodge/Cummins, 5 spd, 121K
1964 Allice Chalmers D15 tractor
2014 Kubota L3800 tractor
1964 VW bug

Giving money and power to government is like giving whiskey and car keys to teenage boys. P.J. O'Rourke
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  #26  
Old 12-31-2008, 02:17 AM
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Red face My Morning with the Mounts

Replaced my motor mounts this morning … and into the afternoon. I, thankfully, had no frozen bolts and five of the six came out easily with a cheap Harbor Freight metric Allen socket and a 3/8 inch universal joint socket adapter. The sixth hex bolt was a bit harder.

Just to clarify, my vehicle is a 1983 240D with a 4 speed stick (W123.123 powered by an OM616.912), and it does NOT have an engine mounted shock absorber.

The old passenger side mount fared the best of the two, once removed it was simply compressed to approximately ½ it’s original size, the driver’s side mount had literally disintegrated, what was left of the rubber were small chards of greasy sponge. The heat shield was also badly bent.

I soaked the mounts the night before in copious amounts of spray on 3-IN-ONE High-Performance Penetrant, and used high pressure air to clean away the debris from the Allen heads. Had it been summer time, I would have power washed the area – Just to cold to get wet this time of year. After disconnecting the throttle linkage, I positioned a 4 ton bottle jack under the oil pan and cushioned the pan with a 2x8. The passenger side mount came out readily after lifting the engine about 2 inches. It was replaced quickly. I did not remove the fan shroud; the blades came close, but never actually touched the shroud. Unfortunately, the driver’s side mount required MUCH more effort.

When I lifted the engine, it lifted considerably more on the passenger side. I thought by sliding the bottle jack to the driver’s side of the oil pan, this might fix the issue. It did not. I found that the remnants of the Anti-Vibration T-Mount that sits on the engine cross member was impeding the lift. I had bought a new T-Mount, and once the old one was removed, the engine lifted away from the damaged motor mount. The hex nut on the fender side of the mount was easily removed. The center large hex bolt came out with a distinct “pop”, an omen for what awaited. The hex bolt on the engine side of the mount could only be removed from below the car working blind and upside down. I was not able to clear all the debris from this hex head, but took the removal slowly, and did not strip the head. I sandwiched the bent heat shield between two pieces of scrap wood and used a vise to press it back into shape.

On re-installation of the driver’s side mount, I had a significant alignment issue. It finally took a choreographed lowering of the engine while prying on it with a big crow bar. After installing the new Anti-Vibration T-Mount, the job was done. I started at 10:00 AM and finished at 3:00 PM, no breaks.

Now for the lessons learned:

· Order the correct number of mounts the FIRST time … I ordered only one engine mount, it was finely crafted in the Fatherland but had to buy a cheap non-OEM P.O.S. from Napa. I’ll post pics, clear difference in quality.

· Soaking the bolts in a penetrant was well worth the slight effort.

· A good power washing would have simplified things.

· A very stubby 5mm hex socket would have simplified removal of the inside driver’s side hex head.

· Remove the anti-vibration t-mount FIRST!

The car now drives much more smoothly, with a whole lot less vibration and noise. I still have a low idle “stutter”, but am feeding the old 616 some “Diesel Purge” tomorrow.
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  #27  
Old 12-31-2008, 08:47 AM
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One thing I found out with aftermarket motor-mounts is the twin holes in the mount for the small allen bolts may be improperly spaced and require elongating them slightly with a drill to prevent the possibility of cocking/cross-threading the bolts into the crossmember. Check them before attempting to tighten them with any force. Make sure the threads on the bolts and in the crossmember are clean. With the mount in place, you should be able to easily screw the allen bolts in by hand, or at least by hand on whatever allen tool you're using. Force should only be needed for the final tightening.

In my case, the holes in one of the German aftermarket replacement 240D mounts were slghtlty off, though they looked OK at a glance. I probably spent 2 extra hours struggling with it before I finally figured out why one allen bolt kept crossthreading. Fortunately, I was able to re-thread the crossmember from below, before slightly modifying the errant mount's holes to finally make it fit my car!

Happy Motoring, Mark
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  #28  
Old 01-02-2009, 08:27 PM
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If anyone has problems ( or has problems they thought new mounts would cure ) after changing the engine mounts it may help to read the FSM instructions on adjusting them properly. It includes instructions about making a gauge for being sure the engine is in the correct relative position.
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  #29  
Old 05-19-2010, 07:15 PM
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easier than I thought

Just finished replacing my mounts. I'm not a mechanic and it took about 3 hours to complete. Prior to doing it I read this entire thread and any other resources I found online. My car is a 1979 300 CD.

Here are the steps I took:

a) A day before, degrease and spray all engine mounting bolts with pb blaster

b) before starting passenger side, remove air filter housing to ease access from above.

1) Removed bottom nuts from engine shock absorbers. I didn't change these because I didn't have parts but they should be easy enough to replace soon.

2) Loosened center bolts but only removed passenger side as I've heard it's easier to keep things lined up for reassembly if you do one side at a time.

3) Unclipped fan shroud and cautiously jacked engine from oil pan using a 2X4 for padding on passenger side of oil pan.

4) Removed the heat shield for easier access to top bolts. Removing top bolts was easy with heat shields out of the way.

5) Had to hike engine up a bit more to slide in new mounts since the old ones were so flat.

6) Tightened down top bolts, and then slid in the heat shields. I used a small crow bar to line up arm while lowering engine. If hole is not lined up for bottom bolt, lift engine a little and pry engine arm into place, even heard a little pop as it seated itself properly.
Once hole for center bottom bolt was nice and lined up with engine resting on mount, I hand threaded it and tightened it down.

7) The driver side was a bit tighter to access but still not too bad with heat shield off. I was able to seat a standard hex wrench in the inner bolt...a small ratchet would have made it even easier.

Shocks and tranny mount are on their way so I can finish this job completely!

Last edited by espin0za; 05-20-2010 at 03:25 AM.
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  #30  
Old 05-19-2010, 07:34 PM
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I'm going to undertake an oil cooler job next week when I get back from school.

I remember someone on this forum mentioning a better product than PB Blaster. I want to say it was Creol or Kreol something like that.

Can someone enlighten me? I remember some user on this forum singing praises about it. Google and the search isn't helping me much either.
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Going back to the original post: "Can you get the vac to blow instead?" No. Vacuums are low pressure so they by nature "suck" and nature abhors them.
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Old 05-19-2010, 07:34 PM
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