Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help




Go Back   PeachParts Mercedes-Benz Forum > Mercedes-Benz Tech Information and Support > Diesel Discussion

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16  
Old 04-14-2014, 12:15 AM
mach4's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: San Diego County, CA
Posts: 2,736
Well, it's back to the drawing board on the air conditioning project. While the system worked well, there was a problem with the bracket I made (actually modified). For some reason, that I still can't figure out, the bracket made the compressor pulley out of alignment with the engine pulley. This caused the belt to appear to stretch, but was actually wear.

So now that A/C season is approaching, I decided to re-engineer the bracket and ensure that the alignment was spot on to avoid the wear problem.

Here's the new bracket fresh from being powder coated in black chrome (pay no attention to my welds - I know they're ugly)



In the course of modifying the bracket I noted that the compressor didn't line up properly as is evidenced in this image. Hmmm, another bracket alignment problem. Well, this time, I'll fix it before it gets on the car.



So the solution was to move the compressor forward by using spacers and a sleeve. It was a little tricky to get everything to fit snug to prevent excess pressure on the compressor tabs. To avoid having to loosen the tab bolt every time the belt needs tightening, the bolt will be snugged enough to have adequate pressure to eliminate slack, but loose enough to move with the heim tensioner.



I also welded the nut to the outside of the tab so I only have one mounting bolt and since this will not be fully tightened, I drilled the allen head bolt for safety wire to prevent backing out. (Now I've just got to find some safety wire locally)



My hope is to be able to swap brackets without having to empty the propane out of the system and re-charge. It's really, really tight in there, so I won't know until I try.
Attached Thumbnails
Air Conditioning for my Diesel SL-comp-bracket1.jpg   Air Conditioning for my Diesel SL-comp-bracket2.jpg   Air Conditioning for my Diesel SL-comp-bracket3.jpg   Air Conditioning for my Diesel SL-comp-bracket4.jpg  
__________________
Current Stable
  • 380SL (diesel)
  • Corvette C5
  • Manx
  • Baja Bug
  • F350 Powerstroke
  • Auburn Boattail Speedster replica
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 04-20-2014, 12:47 AM
mach4's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: San Diego County, CA
Posts: 2,736
Made significant progress on the project over the past few days. Finished up the bracket and associated bits and installed them in the car. Access requires pulling the fan, radiator, oil cooler lines and power steering pump and even then things are tricky tight.



Note the safety wire on the mounting tabs bolt. This is to allow the bolt to be snugged but not completely tightened so it doesn't overstress the mounting ears on the compressor and the compressor belt can be adjusted without loosening the bolt.

Also note my installation "cheaters" - screws tacked to the tube and shim. Once it was installed, I just broke them off.

I was hoping to be able to get the system charged and tested, but alas, no such luck. I found a receiver/dryer locally but unfortunately it was a URO brand and when I went to install it, I found that the threads for one of the switches was way too large. So I took it back and ordered the right one... same brand as on the car now.

Got everything buttoned up and started the engine and got lots of smoke and rubber smell. First I thought it was just a new belt taking a set, but this was lots of smoke. Investigation showed that the belt, and the pulley rim, was contacting the sway bar. Apparently this belt was a tiny bit smaller than the one I took off and didn't allow enough tightening to pull the compressor pulley away from the sway bar. So next stop is to source the next size larger belt which will allow the compressor to swing upward and provide the clearance I need.

The compressor is really, really tight in there and there's not a lot of wiggle room either way.

Still can't figure out why I need spacers to get the proper belt alignment with the bracket, but at least things are lined up properly and things look good. Can't wait to get it charged and have A/C for the summer.
Attached Thumbnails
Air Conditioning for my Diesel SL-comp-bracket5.jpg  
__________________
Current Stable
  • 380SL (diesel)
  • Corvette C5
  • Manx
  • Baja Bug
  • F350 Powerstroke
  • Auburn Boattail Speedster replica
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 04-22-2014, 12:45 AM
ROLLGUY's Avatar
ROLLGUY
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,708
Quote:
Originally Posted by mach4 View Post
Here's the new bracket fresh from being powder coated in black chrome (pay no attention to my welds - I know they're ugly)
I hate to say it, but I really don't like your welds. I have had a few plates come back that had sleeves and other parts broken at the welds. These were from the first batch, and I have since improved the welds on subsequent plates. On the newest batch, I am even welding the back side of the three sleeves. All this to say that even the welds on my first batch of plates looked much less like bubble gum than your welds. The only reason I am saying this (but probably too late), is that I would have (and will) offer to go over your welds to get more penetration. I have learned the hard way, that I need to turn the heat up on my welder and make sure all the welds are good. I have one of the best welding machines available (IMO), it's just that any inferior welds are because of me, not the machine. Obviously this should have been done before powder coating, but it is too late for that. Another problem with powder coating (notice my plates are painted with spray can engine enamel), is that everywhere a bolt is against the coating, it will slowly wear away and the bolt will loosen. That is why it was suggested I don't powder coat the plates. If it is not too late, at least remove the plate and file or sand the areas that touch the block so it is metal to metal, and no PC in between. I don't want to spread doom and gloom, but between the powder coat and the low penetration welds, I think that Diesel engine will rattle that plate apart in as many pieces as it is fabricated from. Thick material requires more heat, and I don't think your machine has enough heat to make a sound weld in that thick material. If it comes to making a third plate (or repairing your first plate), please have me or someone else fix those welds for you. Then again, everything may be just fine and I am getting concerned over something that is not that big of a deal. It is evident how much work you are putting into this A/C system, and I don't want to see you spinning your wheels and doing the work over and over again (believe me, I've been there).......Rich
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 04-22-2014, 02:04 AM
mach4's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: San Diego County, CA
Posts: 2,736
Quote:
Originally Posted by ROLLGUY View Post
I hate to say it, but I really don't like your welds. I have had a few plates come back that had sleeves and other parts broken at the welds. These were from the first batch, and I have since improved the welds on subsequent plates. On the newest batch, I am even welding the back side of the three sleeves. All this to say that even the welds on my first batch of plates looked much less like bubble gum than your welds. The only reason I am saying this (but probably too late), is that I would have (and will) offer to go over your welds to get more penetration. I have learned the hard way, that I need to turn the heat up on my welder and make sure all the welds are good. I have one of the best welding machines available (IMO), it's just that any inferior welds are because of me, not the machine. Obviously this should have been done before powder coating, but it is too late for that. Another problem with powder coating (notice my plates are painted with spray can engine enamel), is that everywhere a bolt is against the coating, it will slowly wear away and the bolt will loosen. That is why it was suggested I don't powder coat the plates. If it is not too late, at least remove the plate and file or sand the areas that touch the block so it is metal to metal, and no PC in between. I don't want to spread doom and gloom, but between the powder coat and the low penetration welds, I think that Diesel engine will rattle that plate apart in as many pieces as it is fabricated from. Thick material requires more heat, and I don't think your machine has enough heat to make a sound weld in that thick material. If it comes to making a third plate (or repairing your first plate), please have me or someone else fix those welds for you. Then again, everything may be just fine and I am getting concerned over something that is not that big of a deal. It is evident how much work you are putting into this A/C system, and I don't want to see you spinning your wheels and doing the work over and over again (believe me, I've been there).......Rich
I don't like the welds either, obviously. That said, I think I'll be OK. I'm using a 115v Lincoln welder so I'm on the short end of the power curve and I'm using CO2 as the shielding gas which makes the welds more "lumpy". If I had it to do over I'd have invested in a larger welder and gone with Argon.

In the areas where there is metal on metal the powder coat has been removed. Paint would have been easier, but I've got the powder coating gear so decided to pull it out and use it for a change.

It's in there and things are buttoned up, so it will stay for now. If it breaks - so be it. I'll take my chances...and I'll know I've got no one to blame but myself.

The good news is, if it breaks, I can just put the top down.
__________________
Current Stable
  • 380SL (diesel)
  • Corvette C5
  • Manx
  • Baja Bug
  • F350 Powerstroke
  • Auburn Boattail Speedster replica
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 04-22-2014, 10:52 AM
ROLLGUY's Avatar
ROLLGUY
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,708
Quote:
Originally Posted by mach4 View Post
I don't like the welds either, obviously. That said, I think I'll be OK. I'm using a 115v Lincoln welder so I'm on the short end of the power curve and I'm using CO2 as the shielding gas which makes the welds more "lumpy". If I had it to do over I'd have invested in a larger welder and gone with Argon.

In the areas where there is metal on metal the powder coat has been removed. Paint would have been easier, but I've got the powder coating gear so decided to pull it out and use it for a change.

It's in there and things are buttoned up, so it will stay for now. If it breaks - so be it. I'll take my chances...and I'll know I've got no one to blame but myself.

The good news is, if it breaks, I can just put the top down.
Well I am glad to hear that you will be ok what ever happens. I wish you the best of luck with it....Rich
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2018 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Peach Parts or Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page