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-   -   RPM hall effect sensor... Can I read it with a multi meter? (http://www.peachparts.com/shopforum/diesel-discussion/339290-rpm-hall-effect-sensor-can-i-read-multi-meter.html)

winmutt 05-25-2013 04:59 PM

RPM hall effect sensor... Can I read it with a multi meter?
 
For 85 and up diesels you get the tach pick up off the ring gear. This has two wires. How does this translate to RPM? I am trying to read this with an arduino and it's not clear if it voltage or resistance or what....

compu_85 05-25-2013 05:07 PM

It will make an AC waveform. Higher frequency = faster. It will work very much like an ABS wheel speed sensor.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6dCoYv511AI

-J

97 SL320 05-25-2013 05:23 PM

Also, make sure your input can handle the sensors max voltage + some head room otherwise it might start clipping and you will end up with eratic readings. Don't try to measure the voltage and convert it to RPM, you will end up having non repeatable readings. Frequency ( analog ) is all you care about, duty cycle won't get it done either.

The sensor is a coil of wire wrapped around a rod magnet, the end of the rod looks at the flywheel teeth.

This type of system is very comon on industrial diesels, look at " Murphy " brand for off the shelf tachs, speed switches.

bricktron 05-25-2013 05:24 PM

so no, not with a multimeter. the waveform is just a sine wave, but you need to be able to count the periods, so an oscilloscope is the right tool for visualizing it.

are you trying to replace the EGR computer? i put an old-style tach amp on my '85 engine.

mach4 05-25-2013 05:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by winmutt (Post 3151578)
For 85 and up diesels you get the tach pick up off the ring gear. This has two wires. How does this translate to RPM? I am trying to read this with an arduino and it's not clear if it voltage or resistance or what....

Although a bit technical, it's not actually a Hall sensor, it's a VR sensor (varible reluctor). As has been pointed out, the signal is an AC signal that is read as one pulse every time the voltage goes from positive to negative.

97 SL320 05-25-2013 06:53 PM

I just thought of something, some super multi meters have a frequency measurement function, this should work for what you want to be. However digital meters are useless for fast changing values.

bergmjh 05-25-2013 07:05 PM

The sensor should have an ohm reading of 750-1000 ohms cold. If the sensor reads 1000 to 1200 ohms cold it is marginal and should work with the engine cold. 1200 ohms and up is a bad sensor. The later models that use the sensor for ignition firing use the same style of sensor. Just in a different package. John

winmutt 05-25-2013 07:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mach4 (Post 3151596)
Although a bit technical, it's not actually a Hall sensor, it's a VR sensor (varible reluctor). As has been pointed out, the signal is an AC signal that is read as one pulse every time the voltage goes from positive to negative.

That explains why there is no such thing as a 2 wire hall sensor....

winmutt 05-25-2013 07:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 97 SL320 (Post 3151586)
Also, make sure your input can handle the sensors max voltage + some head room otherwise it might start clipping and you will end up with eratic readings. Don't try to measure the voltage and convert it to RPM, you will end up having non repeatable readings. Frequency ( analog ) is all you care about, duty cycle won't get it done either.

The sensor is a coil of wire wrapped around a rod magnet, the end of the rod looks at the flywheel teeth.

This type of system is very comon on industrial diesels, look at " Murphy " brand for off the shelf tachs, speed switches.

I guess I can figure out the max with my multi meter thanks!

winmutt 05-25-2013 08:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bricktron (Post 3151587)
are you trying to replace the EGR computer? i put an old-style tach amp on my '85 engine.

I'm working on round 2 of this:

ESM Amarino project part 1 - YouTube

I lost all the code but I now have the arduino working with thermocoupler and the OEM bosch boost sensor from the 91 300d. I will probably get the BT and android interface working again but I am going to put a 1.8" lcd where my broken tach is.

funola 06-01-2013 03:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bergmjh (Post 3151621)
The sensor should have an ohm reading of 750-1000 ohms cold. If the sensor reads 1000 to 1200 ohms cold it is marginal and should work with the engine cold. 1200 ohms and up is a bad sensor. The later models that use the sensor for ignition firing use the same style of sensor. Just in a different package. John

On which engine? From my notes the RPM sensor on an OM-617 (the one near the harmonic balancer) should be around 80 ohms. It's resistance should not change much.


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