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  #1  
Old 01-07-2018, 09:35 AM
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2007 Bluetec won't start at -20

I've got a 2007 e320 Bluetec. I've had it for a couple of years and it has always started well in cold weather. This sustained cold has done it in somehow.

It's -17 this morning and it started right up and ran for two minutes and then stalled. I've treated the fuel with Diesel 911 and put a new fuel filter in in November. I can try it after five minutes and it will start right up again and stall. When the temperature gets up to around zero, it will more likely start. This has happened several times during the current cold snap.

Seems like fuel is getting to the engine as it starts repeatedly, but that it may be restricted in the fuel line. Is that reasonable or may there be another reason?

Thanks for any suggestions.
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  #2  
Old 01-07-2018, 09:58 AM
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I thought you were supposed to keep em running at -17?

I've never experienced it but it does sound like fuel gelling issues.
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  #3  
Old 01-07-2018, 10:24 AM
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I'd suspect gelling too. Might be a good idea to treat the fuel, get it running, and drive to a warmer climate! At -20 I wouldn't even be going near the windows, much less going outside, NO THANKS!!!!
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  #4  
Old 01-07-2018, 11:00 AM
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You could try installing a contact heater on the oil pan. I don't know if these come with a block heater, but you could always install an in-line lower radiator hose engine heater (Kat's). Warming the engine will naturally warm the fuel system. It won't do anything for the fuel tank, so keep with the anti-gell treatment(s).
BTW: we are enjoying our winter here in the desert of So. Cal. with highs in the 70's and lows in the 30's
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  #5  
Old 01-07-2018, 11:34 AM
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I think that parafin solids get caught by the secondary filter. When Iíve had gelling problems, I replaced the filters as a last resort. -17 is a lot to ask of Diesel fuel, even with winterizing.
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  #6  
Old 01-07-2018, 11:34 AM
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Did you add the 911 earlier and run it awhile to get it throughout the system or did you just now add it to try and fix the problem?
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  #7  
Old 01-07-2018, 01:10 PM
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Seems to be going around, lots of fuel gelling issues this year.

Recommend warming the car, getting it started, and getting a hefty dose of anti gel into the fuel system and circulated. Good luck getting it sorted.

This is also a good lesson for all of us, no skimping on the anti gel this year.
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  #8  
Old 01-07-2018, 02:26 PM
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Bluetec won't start at -20

I guess I'm stuck with gelling.

The engine starts and runs for at least 30 seconds even at -20, so there's nothing wrong that a block heater would fix.

I've put nearly a full quart of 911 in (except for spillage until I figured out I have to put something in the filler neck to open the valve). I put it in over a week ago and the vehicle has run successfully twice for at least six miles each and uphill to warm it up well. The fuel was originally treated with the diesel flow product in the white bottle made by the 911 folks. Wonder how much you need to use. I used the amount recommended for below 0.
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  #9  
Old 01-07-2018, 06:11 PM
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Just by coincidence I was unpacking my Optilube order just now and found this in the box, a timely reminder for those in cold climates;
Attached Thumbnails
2007 Bluetec won't start at -20-antigel.jpg  
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  #10  
Old 01-07-2018, 06:20 PM
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sorry for the small size.....lets try this
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2007 Bluetec won't start at -20-anti3.jpg  
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  #11  
Old 01-07-2018, 06:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pokeyarw View Post
-20
Where the hell is it that cold?
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  #12  
Old 01-07-2018, 10:32 PM
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I've been driving MB diesels for 30 years........

..... and I've never been in a situation where I've had trouble with fuel gelling.

On occasion, when I've traveled to a location where I was concerned about the temperature, I've tossed in extra anti gel before, and during, the trip.

Here in Tidewater, VA., we rarely see extremely low temperatures, the last couple of weeks being the exception, with single digit lows expected again tonight. I did have the 89 Dodge-Cummins 4wd out the other day when it was in the teens due to the snow and ice but suffered no fuel issues. Normally, the vehicles are stored inside the shop and attached garage, where the temps are above freezing.

I know that there are summer and winter diesel blends, and there may be additional additives for cold weather locations, but what are the general temperatures at which point gelling becomes a real concern?
Apparently, +10 deg F is above the point of gelling for me locally.......

Thanks to dieselmania for the info on the two different types of treatment, although judging by his location, it's an academic point for him!
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  #13  
Old 01-08-2018, 05:41 PM
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I had the same gelling issues last weekend where it was 4 deg F in northern New Jersey with my 2015 ML 250. I left it outside over night. In the morning it would start and run for 10 - 15 seconds then die.
After 3 days of frigid no starts I had to pay a hundred bucks to tow the car into my remote , heated garage. Next morning a perfect start!
It serves my lazy ass right for not wanting to walk the 150 yards to the garage! Needless to say I am garaging every nite now.


I would add the anti jell, but I thought I was warned that ANY additive was werbotten in MB CDI or Bluetec engines. Am I wrong on that point?


BTW, I saw a tech sheet that said for Northeast winter diesel had to have it's jell point to -17 deg.


I have had 7 MB diesels over the years and I love my ML 250 diesel, but the thought of getting stranded on a frigid nite is scary to me.


Stay warm,
jz
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  #14  
Old 01-08-2018, 06:42 PM
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In the US northeast, Diesel fuel is treated to -4F (-20C) on average. I suspect local fuel stops may add more antigel as needed, so your experience will vary. See page 136:

https://www.infineum.com/media/80722/wdfs-2014-full-screen.pdf
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  #15  
Old 01-09-2018, 05:54 PM
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Mxfrank, That is quite a comprehensive study. Thanks.


My diesel jelled at +4 deg.last weekend, but the wind chill was like -5.
I could have gotten some poor quality fuel maybe?


Wind chill is an effect on human skin, not machine, right?


thanks,


jz
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