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  #16  
Old 01-09-2019, 01:46 PM
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The best light gauge fuel tank repair for several reasons. Is a pretty simple solder patch. Automotive car gas tanks are pressed out of steel that has a layer of lead or a mixture with zinc applied to both sides of the steel. Electrolylic deposition was used well before this tank was made. To prevent rusting. Up until the 1950s the sheet steel or whole tank was immersed in a metals bath. Resulting in a really thick protective coating of sacrificial metals. Technically the metal was galvanized.

You do not want to destroy this with the high heat of welding in the repair area. Really a few minute repair for a radiator shop if you lack the confidence or soldering equipment. Actually when trying a weld you can generate really bad fumes from that coating as well.

The really nice thing is after you remove any paint from the repair area. The tank steel is already pre tinned for you. Strength of a solder repair is more than adequate.

I would solder on a brass or copper patch myself. Plus as a bonus the existing hole may even aid in cleaning out the tank. Before soldering the patch on.

I would not hot tank it either. As it may damage the coating on the steel. Having owned a company called speedy gas tank at one time. I still remember a thing or two about them.

At the same time not knowing everything. Since these tanks were not a rust out problem because of their location. We never really dealt with them in the day.

Try to get the fuel gauge with the larger tank thrown in in the deal.. For a couple of reasons. Yours might have been damaged in the vacuum collapse. Or although I do not know. The gauge used in the larger tank may be longer. Again I do not know. It may be the same. Also keep the gauge you do not use. They do wear out and will become very scarce in the not too long future.

A poster pointed out something that I was not aware of. In you need a new neck grommet. My guess is the uro one is just plain or very poor rubber. Go for the original part if needed It should not break the bank.

If it is practical use your own gauge in the new tank. Although easy to change out going with the devil you know can be a better option with these ones.

Last but not least. If you have an opportunity to see the car the tank is coming off. Since there are few showing up in your area now.. As would be the case in mine. . I would do a quick look at it for the presence of newer parts. Depending on many things but primarily price. Although if they are charging just twenty dollars for that tank they sound reasonable to me.

Things like a spare glow plug controller and heater motor for example. If you never use them at some point they will be easy to resell. Many times you can cut a deal with a salvage operation if the car is just waiting to be pressed soon. On average the parts we want make no money at all for the operators if just pressed.


In the overall scheme of things a modest hole punched into solid gas tank is not a big deal. It is not a reason to reject one plus this hole may be generating the low price you have been given. Punching holes in gas tanks was far less common when we were in the business.
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  #17  
Old 01-09-2019, 01:53 PM
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@ Barry ;

? May I assume you rn a scrap yard once ? .

i did and we never punched fuel tanks .

VW didn't do any zinc or other rust proofing nor did the Americans and Japanese .

I've changed so many over the decades .

The filler neck grommet is important, don't cheap out there .

No need to buy a new flex hose, just cut / peel the sheet metal crimp away and yank the hose off, there's a standard 7MM hose nipple/barb .

DO NOT use a cheapo clamp and remember to get DIESEL RESISTANT hose ! .
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1982 240D creampuff 370,000 miles
1978 300CD back from the dead&1980 300CD ~ SOLD
1984 300CD KEEPER ! 430,XXX miles
1984 Euro 300TD Fully optioned SWMBO's
1974 350SLC 4 speed stickshift SOLD & missed
Krazy Kommie Ural Motos (3)
BMW Moto R60/6 Barn Find, 8,000miles
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  #18  
Old 01-09-2019, 07:30 PM
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Found a tank!

Found the one tank in the one W123 at a pick 'n' pull the W.P. B. area, and as best i can tell, they actually cut the hose rather than puncture, so i may have lucked out. $36 with the sending unit and tax.



I think i will pull the strainer, and clean it out with some gasoline and maybe a bit of biobor for good measure, and put it in tomorrow. Good timing, 'cuz almost all the fuel has leaked out of the old tank. It's from a 300 D, so it should fit OK in the 240D and maybe have a bit more capacity.



Thanks for all the help and advice!
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  #19  
Old 01-10-2019, 12:12 AM
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Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Sunny So. Cal. !
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Post Tank Sourced

Good deal ! .

Toss in a handfull of sheet metal screws and washers before you pour in the cleanng agent, shake the beejeebers out of it and then shake it some more, drain and rinse .

Pea gravel works well too .
__________________
-Nate
1982 240D creampuff 370,000 miles
1978 300CD back from the dead&1980 300CD ~ SOLD
1984 300CD KEEPER ! 430,XXX miles
1984 Euro 300TD Fully optioned SWMBO's
1974 350SLC 4 speed stickshift SOLD & missed
Krazy Kommie Ural Motos (3)
BMW Moto R60/6 Barn Find, 8,000miles
1959 VW #113 Deuxe Beetle, 36hp engine, stock
Junk, Rust, Arthritis, Crushed Spine,Broken Neck&Back
Memories &Peace Of Mind
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  #20  
Old 01-10-2019, 01:57 PM
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That's not a bad price in todays world for a fuel tank and gauge. I was thinking what is possibly the easiest way to clean a fuel tank out today for the average person?

Put in a good detergent solution and let it soak then remove the gauge and output filter and go at it with a pressure washer? Fuel tanks made in the USA where constructed of tern steel since sometime in the early 50s perhaps. There is a coating on that steel although not too obvious. Probably a thin electroplated coating. Some of the earlier tanks we did appeared to be hot galvanized dipped after manufacturer.

We never ran a salvage operation. We did start each morning with about 5-10 cars that needed either the fuel tank repaired or replaced. New fuel lines or straps. Gauge issues. Plus wholesaled and retailed these items.

I had a large truck and we sourced tanks etc in Central Alabama. From auto wreckers there. In 1981 we wanted to start reproducing the high demand fuel tanks. There was a recession on and the heavy presses etc needed where available much cheaper than usual.

The bank had been watching us and proposed a huge credit line. If we stayed away from government grants etc. I tended to agree as anything they touched did not seem to do that well. So we requested protection from them funding another operation of the same type with taxpayer money. I am not the brightest but I was not going to be in a situation of competing with a heavy debt load against a paid up enterprise. If I am going to be a financial suicide case It has to be on my terms.

There were other issues that made me think. What we are experiencing overall is not good for the future of industry here. Companies with no need to are allowed to freely leave the country with the public not aware that you land up in a joint partnership in going to China. Then logically at some point you really no longer own or control it. Although your name may still remain on the buildings.

China was in reality buying the enterprises for all practical purposes. So there was no issue in my mind back then that north America was going where it is today. A sizable proportion of what is Spectra Premium today occurred with another province being Quebec buying up various operation here. With taxpayers money.

Anyways we went on to develop another related item. Then I did a lot of thinking. Do I really want this with all the complications. With over active governments in the picture? So I sold it. The only practical thing I learnt is flying below the radar and staying small enough not to attract attention is perhaps workable.

Back to the post. In my time we never had the puncture problem. Yet if a tank is basically solid. Soldering on a copper or brass patch works very well. We used heavy electric soldering irons. Welding upsets any metal treatment and the fumes are dangerous. If a person lacks the right soldering equipment or ability just take it to a radiator shop. When we were too busy we would defume and verify the large truck tanks where safe to weld on with a sticker.

We then farmed them out to a welding shop. As a general rule people should not weld on gas or fuel tanks unless they really understand all that can go wrong. It just is not worth the risk. The welding shop we periodically used. Did eventually have an explosion long after we left the business. It was not only heard a good distance away. It almost killed him.

We had a large halon gas setup in place to enable us to cut hitches off some vehicles to get the tanks off. We wore fresh air supplied masks as there was no oxygen where we were working. We never ever had a real fire issue. This particular 123 type fuel tank we never saw in those years. Although we were finished with that business when these cars were still pretty new.

Last edited by barry12345; 01-10-2019 at 02:08 PM.
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  #21  
Old 01-11-2019, 03:53 PM
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I wanted to add. During those days when gas tanks where failing at a very high rate. In our rustbelt. We all to frequently heard of some person or other that was involved in an accident when dealing with their own gas tanks.

We used caution continuously. Plus the best practices we could come up with at the time.. Even with that we got caught once. A supplier sent us a batch of tougher trouble type service light bulbs. Of another brand. The first one of that batch we used somehow ignited the gas fumes. I got caught in the blast.

It may have been the higher service temperature of the bulb or it just self fractured in service. In any event it ignited the fumes. Today of course I would recommend only led type work lights. Around working with leaking gas tanks. That have not been neutralized.

I also wanted to mention. If the car we where working on was getting a urethane exterior tank coating. To keep the flow of work going we could not tie up a hoist. With no tank it is possible to start the car and drive it back out until you are ready to install the refurbished gas tank. Then drive it back in when ready for it.

Until fuel injection occurred. There is enough gas in the average float bowl to do this. With carbs.

On closer examination those substitute bulbs by our supplier where made in the orient. Examining others in the batch . I found the glass to be very thin. My caution today remains as it once was. Be very careful working on leaking gas tanks. Besides the pretty obvious the unexpected can play into a bad situation. As a result of the mass failures of metal gas tanks at that time. Plastic tanks came into vogue.

When you still buy a new car here. In our rustbelt or other bad ones. It is wise to look at the quality of their metal brake lines and fuel lines. Some brands still use poorly protected metal. On brands like Hyundia and Kia just take a brush and grease them all. We dealt with so many leaking lines I cannot even guess at the total numbers. You could probably fill a stadium with the gas tank total. We were never greedy or dishonest. It was even a problem back then in anything automotive service related.

Yet nothing like what goes on today all too often. For example the air we breath has about an 80 percent nitrogen content. So why pay to have your tires filled with nitrogen unless you have a race car.

High purity nitrogen is dryer but I cannot even see the advantage of that. The purity you get is subjective anyways. A lot of places have their own nitrogen generators. More and more semi scams plying on customers as time moves forward. To me it is just the way of the times.

Honda had a massive fuel tank failure problem for example. Since they had a free replacement program that many of the owners that came to us did not know about. We directed them to the dealerships. Had to have been hundreds of them. We were just seeing the start of the oil pan failures in sizable numbers when we got out of the business as well.

You treat customers decently and friendly. Word gets around. I still think or at least hope this still is the case today.

If you are going to keep the car for a substantial time. If you can get the lines that are pre bent in the engine compartment is not bad. Otherwise it is a miserable job to replace them all. Personally I like the lines that have a plastic type coating where only the very ends are exposed to the corrosive enviroment. I had a look at the lines on a 2018 model not long ago. Look to be the same poorly protected lines with the same marginal in comparison to other brands coatings for protection. About 2012 they did add a plastic shield over their lines running under the floor pan. This was not a cure for our rustbelt area of operation.

Last edited by barry12345; 01-11-2019 at 04:08 PM.
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