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  #1  
Old 06-03-2019, 04:13 PM
Greg
 
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Green vs pink antifreeze?

Getting to the end of an 85 om617617 in a f100, I'm using the MB radiator Any downside to using the newer pink antifreeze vs the old green stuff?

Thanks Greg
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  #2  
Old 06-03-2019, 04:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gmerrell View Post
Getting to the end of an 85 om617617 in a f100, I'm using the MB radiator Any downside to using the newer pink antifreeze vs the old green stuff?

Thanks Greg
The 617 works great with zerex G05 which is basically a very mild silicated (green type) antifreeze.

G05 is cheap too.
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  #3  
Old 06-03-2019, 05:16 PM
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Zerex G40 is the latest for MB. Does anyone know whether it is ok to use in the older cars? I would think it would be ok as long as it is not mixed with anything that is not compatible.
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  #4  
Old 06-03-2019, 05:30 PM
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There used to be two colors of antifreeze - maybe green and red - I forget. Then they started making antifreeze that is compatible with both. Is that not still true? You can read the label and it will say it is OK for all cars?
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  #5  
Old 06-03-2019, 05:46 PM
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It was always my understanding that the green coolant is used in any automobile/light truck, while the pink / reddish coolant is used in RV and marine applications (often not used for extended periods of time).
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  #6  
Old 06-03-2019, 05:52 PM
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I always have used the Zerex G05 stuff. Cheaply found at Napa or Walmart.
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  #7  
Old 06-03-2019, 06:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by engatwork View Post
Zerex G40 is the latest for MB. Does anyone know whether it is ok to use in the older cars? I would think it would be ok as long as it is not mixed with anything that is not compatible.
One would assume if the entire system is squeaky clean it would be ok, but with older vehicles that have been using opaque green coolant, its internal crusted deposits can cause gelling. I believe a good dose of citric acid would clean that off - and a good 10 minute powerflushing.
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  #8  
Old 06-03-2019, 08:19 PM
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Found this in Car and Driver:

The old technology, a.k.a. "conventional," a.k.a. "inorganic," is green in color. Most of what you see on the shelves at Wal-Mart and AutoZone is conventional, including the yellow bottles of Prestone and the white bottles of Zerex.

One of the new types is "organic acid technology," or OAT. It's orange. General Motors pioneered this chemistry starting with 1996 models in the U.S. and using the name Dex-Cool. Ford changed a few models to OAT, then backed away from it. VW, Audi, and Porsche are OAT users, too, but most others have resisted.

Instead of OAT, most new cars now use a "hybrid" antifreeze that's formulated with both OAT and the silicate inhibitors from green (Japanese hybrids have different inhibitors). It comes in too many colors to pretend this type is color-coded. Interestingly, Turcotte says that as the materials improve for the white plastic overflow bottles of new cars, and they become less yellowing over time, automakers are becoming more venturesome in choosing coolant colors.

The promise of OAT is long-life corrosion protection, on the order of six years/ 100,000 miles for the initial fill instead of the two years/50,000 miles that was typical with the old green stuff. The GM Dex-Cool formula works fine in systems designed for it. But it eats old-style radiators with lead solder, and the inhibitors work too slowly to protect against the sort of corrosion that happens so fast it actually erodes metal-for example, the cavitation likely in the imperfectly designed water pumps of older cars.

"Cars born with green coolant shouldn't be changed to orange," Turcotte advises. It's also a bad idea to mix the two, although the result doesn't immediately turn into witches' brew.
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Old 06-03-2019, 08:34 PM
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Green all the way.
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  #10  
Old 06-03-2019, 09:33 PM
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One more vote for GO5 in our Diesels. I have heard that Diesel engines need the additive that prevents cavitation, and supposedly GO5 has it. My radiator shop tech told me NAPA has the additive, and should be used in all Diesel engines. However, I have seen many OM60X/61X engines with green coolant, and I doubt any have suffered any harm from it's use. Also, I am sure the green coolant of today is better than what was in the cooling systems in these cars back in the 80's when they were manufactured.....Rich
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  #11  
Old 06-03-2019, 11:12 PM
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I thought Mercedes coolant needs to be orange (Zerex G-05) or blue (genuine Mercedes).
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  #12  
Old 06-04-2019, 12:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Squiggle Dog View Post
I thought Mercedes coolant needs to be orange (Zerex G-05) or blue (genuine Mercedes).
Nope. There's nothing special about the MB cooling system. Just change the coolant every 2 years.
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  #13  
Old 06-04-2019, 12:28 AM
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I did a little research on coolants for Diesels:
https://www.underhoodservice.com/diesel-coolants/


It is unclear if the standard green coolants indeed have the SCAs (Supplemental Coolant Additives) that are needed to prevent cavitation. This article hints to the fact that they did/do have them, but no way to know for sure. I am pretty sure that GO5 does have this additive. Since GO5 is readily available, I choose to use it in all my 'Benzs.
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  #14  
Old 06-04-2019, 01:06 AM
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G05 contains nitrites which (along with molybdates) have positive effect on preventing cavitation in wet liner diesels (which our MB's are not).
G05 formula does not have the dreaded by many 2-EHA salt.

G05 is no longer sold or recommended by MB. The newer HOAT formula (containing 2-EHA, blue in color) G48 is listed as backward compatible with older vehicles.

https://www.glysantin.de/sites/default/files/2018-08/GLYSANTIN_List-Cars_EN.pdf?1557799783

Since G05 is widely available this would be my first choice.

Using an IAT (older type) coolant will probably require 2-3y. change interval.
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  #15  
Old 06-04-2019, 07:30 AM
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I use the GO5. I have a Ford Contour, that uses it too. I also use it in my 98 Jeep Cherokee. You can mix it in a bit stronger concentration (70%) for higher temps. I remember part of the switch to G05 was for aluminum parts.
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