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  #1  
Old 06-12-2019, 10:41 PM
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Noisy York Compressor, 240D

I've had my 240D back on the road the past week or so after the transmission transplant and I'm noticing with the A/C on that the compressor vibrates fairly bad and sounds like it has a bad bearing. I'm getting about 45 degrees so it seems to work. Manifold gauge needles vibrate so I'm thinking it needs a rebuild. Just wanted to get others thoughts. I've read these tend to be a little on the rough side but this seems excessive.
Thanks.
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  #2  
Old 06-12-2019, 11:57 PM
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Dump the York and get a Sanden retrofit. No comparison in cooling ability, engine drag and vibration. 1960's technology vs. a relatively modern compressor.
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  #3  
Old 06-13-2019, 01:37 AM
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I wouldnt bite again on the sanden solution. I have it in my car and my daughter has the factory R4. I have R12 in my Sanden and she is using 134. I cant see any functional performance difference between them. Then some folks will play the reliability card implying that R4 is unreliable. Uh huh. Her R4 is the one that was in the car when it was parked about 14 years ago, sat for over 10 years before she revived it. Still works. I am on my second Sanden in 3 years.

This isnt conclusive data, but it is my experience with both systems. I could have bought 4-5 R4s for what I've spent on the Sanden solution.
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  #4  
Old 06-13-2019, 02:02 AM
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The R4 is not a York compressor. Apples and oranges.
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  #5  
Old 06-13-2019, 09:20 AM
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Are the compressor mounts/cushions in good condition?
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  #6  
Old 06-13-2019, 05:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mark82 View Post
I am on my second Sanden in 3 years.

This isnt conclusive data, but it is my experience with both systems. I could have bought 4-5 R4s for what I've spent on the Sanden solution.
What was the specific failure on the Sanden?
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  #7  
Old 06-13-2019, 07:14 PM
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I’m not big on straying from stock so I’ll stick with the York. Plus it looks like replacements are fairly cheap if I choose to go that route. The mounts could stand to be changed but they are there an intact. And it’s mounted solid. It only acts up when it’s engaged leading me to think it’s a bearing or internal wear. It is fairly loud from inside the car. Is it possible to change the oil on it without discharging the system? Maybe see if it even has any. It gets hot. I’m trying to find some good rebuild vids on YouTube at the moment. Might pose a good learning opportunity.
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  #8  
Old 06-13-2019, 07:50 PM
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Changing oil won't help a failed bearing. The low side of the compressor is referenced to the crankcase so can't just take the plug out.

Many York / Tecumseh compressors have a service valve that allows for isolating the compressor, no idea if yours has this. Regardless, if there is noise, there is likely to be metal shavings moving through the system.
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  #9  
Old 06-13-2019, 10:18 PM
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I’m reading that there is a clutch bearing. Maybe when there is a load it’s causing it to be noisy? Maybe start there?
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  #10  
Old 06-14-2019, 06:26 AM
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The clutch bearing on a York / Tecumseh works differently than most other compressors.

With most other compressors, the bearing mounts between a stationary snout on the front of the compressor and the clutch pulley. In this case the bearing rotates at all times.

With the York / Tecumseh , the bearing is mounted between the pulley and clutch plate. In this case the bearing rotates when the clutch is disengaged but does not when the clutch is engaged. Also, if the bearing seizes up, the clutch becomes engaged.

It's dead Jim.
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  #11  
Old 06-14-2019, 02:46 PM
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York

Also, just from experience with the 76 w115 240D I had, the a/c belt has to be “bow string tight”, like as in hardly any movement when pushing down on the belt with your finger, if at all. - Mike
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  #12  
Old 06-14-2019, 07:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 97 SL320 View Post
What was the specific failure on the Sanden?
The mounting bracket it came with broke, twice. I then fabbed a boxed mount. It has broken the bolts twice now, but not the bracket. Along with the breaks the clutch began failing, first the wiring inside and then the clutch. Clutches are essentially NLA, so it means a new compressor.
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  #13  
Old 06-15-2019, 09:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mark82 View Post
The mounting bracket it came with broke, twice. I then fabbed a boxed mount.
Apparently others have used this without problems.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mark82 View Post
It has broken the bolts twice now, but not the bracket.
What grade bolts did you use? Were they a close fit to all of the holes?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mark82 View Post
Along with the breaks the clutch began failing, first the wiring inside and then the clutch.

Wiring inside as in thermal fuse and failed clutch as in ? On other systems I've seen low voltage to the clutch cause it to slip and burn the thermal fuse / melt nylock nuts at the clutch. There was a large truck at old work that would suffer this problem on a yearly basis. I looked at the wiring diagram and speced out relays and pressure switches in an attempt to reduce voltage drop.
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  #14  
Old 06-19-2019, 10:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikebear79 View Post
Also, just from experience with the 76 w115 240D I had, the a/c belt has to be “bow string tight”, like as in hardly any movement when pushing down on the belt with your finger, if at all. - Mike

You can say that again....


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