Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help



Go Back   PeachParts Mercedes-Benz Forum > Mercedes-Benz Tech Information and Support > Diesel Discussion

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-04-2019, 12:54 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Barrington, RI
Posts: 5,571
OM606 Stuck Glow Plug Crossroads

98 E300 is at the mechanic to replace the #5 glow plug (original). All that it needs to pass inspection. Intake manifold is off and mechanic, trying all the usual tricks, doesn't think the plug is going to come out. So my son needs to figure out what to do. Mechanic has not had good results over the years trying to deal with a broken plug on the 606 with the head in place. So, if we were to fix it, he would lean in the direction of finding a replacement head. Obviously big $$$. But cheaper than buying a new car.

Furthermore, mechanic has seen instances where, when a plug breaks, it breaks in such a way that compression is lost.

I guess my inclination is to apply more torque and see what happens.

Other than AC which is prohibitively expensive to repair, car is well maintained with relatively low miles. Some rust but not much.

Thoughts?

__________________
06 E320 CDI "Benson", Platinum Blue, 177k mi
06 E320 CDI "Rutherford", Black, 149k mi
91 300D "Otis", Smoke Silver, 131k mi
98 E300 "Murray", Silver, 133k mi, Stage 2 Rocketchip chip tuned (FOR SALE)

19 Honda CR-V EX 1k mi
Twelve other MB's owned and sold
1961 Very Tolerant Wife
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-04-2019, 01:57 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 228
This happened to me, with the same car, 20 years ago. At the fanciest shop in town they let it sit overnight and with the engine cold the next morning, while I was there watching, broke the first glow plug he tried.

I was angry because I knew that the engine needed to be hot. In fact Hunter always recommends run the engine until hot, remove the first glow plug and then run the engine again before each and every glow plug.

It cost me 3,000 dollar to rescue the car from the shop and that was the last time that any of my machines have been to a shop.

They removed the head and sent it to a machine shop.

Now when I do the job I ream out the hole and use Liqui Moly LM 508 Anti-Seize Compound on the threads so that this never happens again. And always use Beru glow plugs. Many more years of service life.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-04-2019, 04:21 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Carolina
Posts: 1,395
Plug #5 is one of the easier ones to get at so that's good.
I've had great success with impact drivers. Hot engine, set it on medium torque, and go back and fourth between tighten and loosen continuously until it comes out. expect to spend upward of one hour per plug working it out slowly.
__________________
Current fleet
1992 300D "IceBerg"
1984 300D "Blues Mobile"

1978 300CD "El Toro" Gone on to be born again
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-04-2019, 04:28 PM
Squiggle Dog's Avatar
MBCA Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Surprise, AZ, USA
Posts: 3,621
I don't know how similar the OM606 is, but here is how I removed stuck glow plugs in an OM603 using a nut cut in half: GregMN's 1991 W126 350SDL Has A New Home
__________________
Stop paying for animal enslavement, cruelty, and slaughter. Save your health and the planet. Go vegan! I did 17 years ago. https://challenge22.com/

DON'T MESS WITH MY MERCEDES!


1967 W110 Universal Wagon, Euro, Turbo Diesel, Tail Fins, 4 Speed Manual Column Shift, A/C
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel, DB479 Walnut Brown, Sunroof, Highly Optioned, 350,000+ Miles
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-04-2019, 06:18 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Barrington, RI
Posts: 5,571
We gave the mechanic the green light to forge ahead....and it eventually came out. So dodged a bullet.
__________________
06 E320 CDI "Benson", Platinum Blue, 177k mi
06 E320 CDI "Rutherford", Black, 149k mi
91 300D "Otis", Smoke Silver, 131k mi
98 E300 "Murray", Silver, 133k mi, Stage 2 Rocketchip chip tuned (FOR SALE)

19 Honda CR-V EX 1k mi
Twelve other MB's owned and sold
1961 Very Tolerant Wife
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-04-2019, 09:31 PM
Diesel911's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Long Beach,CA
Posts: 31,109
Make sure some never-seeze type compound gets on the threads.
__________________
84 300D, 82 Volvo 244Gl Diesel
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-04-2019, 09:33 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 401
Congratulation!!
I have done many glow plugs on my old 606. The secret is lots of penetrating oil and having the engine completely hot and heat sunk.

I had some that squeaked and squealed all the way out. Real pucker factor.
__________________
1999 Mercedes E300TD daily driver sold at 238K miles 106K miles were mine, rust worm got it :-(
2006 Mercedes CDI new daily driver! 56,000 miles May 2016 now 85,625 April 2018 and April 2019 101,000 miles.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-06-2019, 07:05 AM
engatwork's Avatar
busy
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Soperton, Ga. USA
Posts: 12,519
The best penetrating oil out there is Kroil. Nothing can hold a candle to it in my opinion. I've used it on a running 606 engine to back a stubborn gp out.
__________________
Jim
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-06-2019, 11:26 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Milford, DE
Posts: 1,463
Quote:
Originally Posted by BiodieselMB View Post
Now when I do the job I ream out the hole and use Liqui Moly LM 508 Anti-Seize Compound on the threads so that this never happens again. And always use Beru glow plugs. Many more years of service life.
The problem of stuck glow plugs has absolutely nothing to do with the threads of the plug seizing in the aluminum head. The problem is the seal between the combustion chamber and the tip of the glow plug fails and over time carbon packs up into the cylindrical channel from the sealing point up to the threads.

Reaming is an important step since the reamer will remove crap from the sealing surface in the head and give you a much better chance of having the new plug seal correctly.

There are quite a few aftermarket broken glow plug removal tools on e-bay, recently I removed a broke glowplug on an OM648 with one of the kits and it worked well. You have to be careful and go slowly but a broken glow plug can be drilled out and removed pretty easily with one of these kits.
__________________
98 Dodge-Cummins pickup (123k)
99 CLK320 (352K)
08 SL550 (113K)
13 GLK250 (86K)
14 E250 (61k)
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-06-2019, 12:52 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Milford, DE
Posts: 1,463
One other thing to consider when installing glow plugs with anti-seize compound on the threads is that lubricant on the threads significantly effects the published torque specification. As I recall you have to decrease the torque spec by 40-50% when using a dry spec with a lubricant on the threads.

When you're threading steel into aluminum threads this can be a bit significant.
__________________
98 Dodge-Cummins pickup (123k)
99 CLK320 (352K)
08 SL550 (113K)
13 GLK250 (86K)
14 E250 (61k)
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 11-06-2019, 12:59 PM
ILUVMILS's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 2,714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phillytwotank View Post
Plug #5 is one of the easier ones to get at so that's good.
I've had great success with impact drivers. Hot engine, set it on medium torque, and go back and fourth between tighten and loosen continuously until it comes out. expect to spend upward of one hour per plug working it out slowly.

This is exactly how it's done by the dealership tech's. Use a 3/8" drive impact....
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 11-06-2019, 01:18 PM
jake12tech's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 2,765
One thing I want to point out is he said it’s easier to find a replacement head. I’d have to say he isn’t very bright considering you could bring it to a machine shop, and have them extract it. Other than that, the furthest 2 cylinders are the Ones that break the most. I’ve had 5 working plugs for 2-3 years. Smokes and evens out quickly.
__________________
1999 E300 220k
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 11-06-2019, 01:40 PM
Diesel user
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 18
Here is what I did on a cold engine:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3fC0TK0LkRQ


Text from the video:
"A dangerous trick to try and prevent glow plug issues during removal.



First lightly tap the plug with air hammer. Then ever so gently work the glowplug back and fourth with a little tapping between movements. After a couple cycles of this very slowly back out the plug. In this application only the tip of the plug extends into the prechamber. The point of entry to the prechamber collects carbon which seizes the tip in place. If plug removal with tip seized in place is attempted it can break off of the threaded plug body and create a large, not very fun project.



Don't punch a hole in your head!"


I got the idea from the Duramax tool, as seen in action here:


https://youtu.be/EwQmFHIWQjQ?t=101

Be sure to ream out the carbon every time you have a plug removed, that is critical for glow plug life and performance.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 11-06-2019, 05:05 PM
TwoMuchBoost's Avatar
Definitely 100% stock
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: NW Indiana
Posts: 40
Shocking the threads with a hammer or air chisel is always a good idea on anything that goes into aluminum. Since glowplugs are so cheap and replaced upon removal Even Porsche service manuals tell you to get the 12point head-bolts a solid whack if troublesome to remove and I've had a couple I thought were going to break for sure.

Another interesting method I came across on youtube involves some drilling, tapping, and slide hammering but worth taking a look at if you're all out of other options.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U9AO_cDdwS8
__________________
{2010 Mazda 3 266,000mi} - daily since new, Airlift suspension + some chunky sway-bars: fastest pass 17.7@77MPH
{1987 300SDL 256,000mi} - stock turbo @ 22lbs straight piped + a whole bunch of pre-turbo water/meth injection, 722.3 with increased line pressure, special sauce, and shift kit: fastest pass 16.5@82
{1992 964 Carrera 4 Frankenstein ??,???mi} - 993 forward dated, Speedster conversion, GT45 + E85: fastest pass 12.5@113
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 11-06-2019, 05:53 PM
Diesel user
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoMuchBoost View Post
Shocking the threads with a hammer or air chisel is always a good idea on anything that goes into aluminum.



The vibration needs to be applied to the plug end through the electrical terminal, this is the piece which usually breaks off of the threaded body. The tip gets seized into the prechamber with carbon, the vibration loosens this so the whole tip and body assembly will rotate when removed. This problem becomes worse if the plug tip expands as it fatigues with many high heat cycles. The threaded plug body usually comes out without too much protest either way.



OM606 Stuck Glow Plug Crossroads-plug.png

Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2018 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Peach Parts or Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page