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  #16  
Old 05-23-2022, 11:21 AM
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Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Ocean Isle Beach, NC
Posts: 2,487
Corrected things this morning. Took a test drive and so far so good. I'll put it on my calendar to check in a month or so. The car gets driven maybe a hundred miles a month in a heavy month. The car drove seven miles on the backwards pad. Pad backside had the little "nipples" pretty much worn away, but other than that I think it is still serviceable.
Rotor was in pretty decent shape, so I opted not to take it off and have it turned. Hoping the pads will clean up and smooth things up in a bit. Still can't believe I did this - my goodness, what a brain fart!!

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'59 220S Cabriolet-SOLD and living happily in Malta
'83 240D 351,500 miles original owner-SOLD
'88 560SL 41,000 miles - totaled and parted out
https://sites.google.com/site/mercedesstuff/home
'99 E300 turbo 222,500 miles
'03 SLK320 40,000 miles - gave to my daughter
'14 Smart electric coupe 22,500 miles
'14 Smart electric cabriolet 23,500 miles
'15 Smart electric coupe 21,500 miles

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  #17  
Old 05-24-2022, 11:44 AM
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Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: WYO
Posts: 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by sokoloff View Post
I bought some ATE front brake rotors for my 1999 E300D fifteen years ago and they have given me about 160,000 miles - can't beat that. Just measured them today and they are at 24 mm. Minimum is 25.4 mm if my info is accurate. Based on that experience with ATE rotors, I'd like to go that route again if they are still available.

What harm can I do if I try to squeeze a few more miles out of them? I'm lucky to put 2000 miles a year on the car these days. We've got a couple of Smart electrics and probably use them for 98% of our driving. We absolutely love them. Really nice these days to drive past gas stations and just smile, smile, smile.
You can use rotors that are just a little past runout by keeping fresh pads on them to compensate especially on the rear which gets little wear anyway but if they were on the front throw some rotors on and keep your old pads if they are not worn. With dubious supply chain issues I would at buy the rotors at least. Pennywise pound foolish as they say.
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  #18  
Old 05-24-2022, 01:54 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2004
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HughO View Post
...but if they were on the front throw some rotors on and keep your old pads if they are not worn. With dubious supply chain issues I would at buy the rotors at least. Pennywise pound foolish as they say.
Installing used pads on new rotors is, as they say, "penny wise and pound foolish." New rotors always deserve new pads. There are no exceptions.
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  #19  
Old 05-24-2022, 03:47 PM
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Runout is a measure of warpage of the rotor to me. Typically gives a throbbing sound or the pedal is a little funny. Pulsating pedal is also common

Thickness is what it means. The thickness of the rotor. Also forget machining of rotors in general today. You are not driving a sport model four door Bentley. Where original rotors being ceramic carbon fiber are 5,500.00 each. Try to put well over twenty thousand dollars in you mind for rotors and pads installed. The hotter they get the less they fade.

Front end of your car 100.00 for parts Amazon or ebay delivered should do it. Nothing much would happen in general driving easily. With what you have now.

My feeling is that if you are buying electric cars this is not a big dollar decision. Plus deffered needs are cumulative in nature. What if you age and sell the car?

Some kid keeps braking too hard. We can forget things as the years go by. Also the pistons on your calipers may be extending a little farther as the pads wear down.

Steering issues can be worse than brake issues. Yet brake issues can be a close second perhaps. Although I would rather lose brakes than steering any day.

What bothers me a little. Sometimes brake rotors seem to warp or develop run out for no apparent reason. Same thing different description.
It also is just an opinion not based on any fact. Rotors and pads will possibly never be cheaper than now.

Advertisng is just that. To my knowledge most common rotors are cast in China. Then sent to North America and machined here. My guess is with general marketing today. The name on the box does not really mean that much. I could be wrong about that though.

I also buy ceramic brake pads. Perhaps less dust and less rotor wear. They are only nominally more expensive than metallic pads. Metallic pads are sold but kind of not as much anymore.

Again in my experience do not buy coated rotors. Just buy plain cheapies. I see no valid reason not to.

Finally I could ask the wife for her opinion. I thought why should only me be subject to it? She suggested I should give you the full treatment for a simple question like she gets. I get this look from her of why did I ask. In less than two months I will be eighty. Our relationship has been good over more combined years than I care to remember. She just gets this expression when I get too technical.

Not many consider that on a vented rotor unlike a non vented rotor. One worn pad is usually much thinner than the other. A vented rotor is really two surfaces spaced. So the majority of wear on the rotor will be on one side. Leaving two unequal sides in thickness. You can wear down totally through one side with the other side still having a lot of surface material left in comparison. The majority of your wear is more likely to be on one side than the other. When you have vented rotors. Although two opposed pistons per caliper help to avoid this when both pistons are really good. You are going to see more pad wear on one pad that the other when the caliper is not quite right. Or one sides pads are sticking. Working on our own brakes is not really complicated. Doing it right though is important. Not hard but read up on how if not a lot of experience.

This is one reason I suspect the rotor limit on wear or thickness is also present. That thinner disk portion of the rotor is going to heat up a lot faster with the loss of mass on that side. . Heat transfer through the interconnecting webs cannot equalize it fast enough. Perhaps this is why the webs sometimes crack. The expansion of one side of the rotor then is materially more than the other side.. So the overall thickness is probably a factor in the min thickness of each sides rating as well.

Last edited by barry12345; 05-24-2022 at 04:54 PM.
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  #20  
Old 05-24-2022, 04:55 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2012
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Runout is a measure of warpage of the rotor to me. Typically gives a throbbing sound or the pedal is a little funny.

Thickness is what it means. The thickness of the rotor. Also forget machining of rotors in general today. You are not driving a sport model four door Bentley. Where original rotors being ceramic carbon fiber are 5,500.00 each. Try to put well over twenty thousand dollars in you mind for rotors and pads installed. The hotter they get the less they fade.

Front end of your car 100.00 for parts Amazon or ebay delivered should do it. Nothing much would happen in general driving easily.

My feeling is that if you are buying electric cars this is not a big dollar decision. Plus deffered needs are cumulative in nature. What if you age and sell the car?

Some kid keeps braking too hard. We can forget things as the years go by. Also the pistons on your calipers may be extending a little far as the pads wear down.

Steering issues can be worse than brake issues. Yet brake issues can be a close second perhaps. Although I would rather lose brakes than steering any day.

What bothers me a little. Sometimes brake rotors seem to warp or develop run out for no apparent reason. Same thing different description. It also is just an opinion not based on any fact. Rotors and pads will possibly never be cheaper than now.

Advertisng is just that. To my knowledge most common rotors are cast in China. Then sent to North America and machined here. My guess is with general marketing today. The name on the box does not really mean that much. I could be wrong about that though.

I also buy ceramic brake pads. Perhaps less dust and less rotor wear. They are only nominally more expensive than metallic pads. Metallic pads are sold but kind of not as much anymore.

Again in my experience do not buy coated rotors. Just buy plain cheapies. I see no valid reason not to. I also have had problems with coated rotors.

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