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  #1  
Old 03-06-2003, 12:02 PM
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Valve adjusting wrenchs & temper

No, this is not about losing my temper while adjusting the valves. is about getting "temper"

I made valve adjusting wrenches out of a couple of chepo 14 mms using a "real" set as a templet. Used the torch to get the bends right and 3/8 pipe handles welded on. Cut the box end off, flattened the end of the pipe a taste so the cut off end would fit into the pipe and welded it.

Anyway my question is how should they be tempered,? A friend said heat them up again and dump them in oil??

This was a fairly easy job taking less then an hour but then I haven,t tried them out yet either.
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1985 Euro 300TD 5 spd 220K
1985 Euro 240D 5 spd 130K
1979 240D 5 spd, 40K on engine rebuild
1994 Dodge/Cummins, 5 spd, 121K
1964 Allice Chalmers D15 tractor
2014 Kubota L3800 tractor
1964 VW bug

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Old 03-06-2003, 12:58 PM
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There are some variables which we can't test here.... mostly having to do with "how" cheapo they are... but if you bent them without breaking or cracking them you are probably going to be ok..

Plunging them into oil , held with tongs, fire fighting equiptment close, leather apron, leather gloves, eye protection, etc...
With them cherry red or to where they are not magnetic.... end first, after having coated them with soap before you started heating them.. will make them brittle... that is the first step...

Then, I expect that you can use a method used to temper springs in guns... submerge the wrenches in oil and heat the oil until it catches on fire.. you can just let it burn off... best outdoors unless you have a forge with exhaust plumbing...

This should be fine for what you are doing.... depending of course on the original questions concerning quality of the steel...
I used Sears wrenches when I did this... some great metal in them....

http://www.peachparts.com/shopforum/search.php?action=showresults&searchid=370894&sortby=lastpost&sortorder=descending
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  #3  
Old 03-06-2003, 08:41 PM
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leathermang

thanks for the tempering lessons. I have allot of dino w/30 around , I spoz that would do, Coat with soap, liquid detergent, then heated up, and thats just the open end part, OK
The next part sounds like the way I make do nuts, heat the oil till it catches fire, OK outside with the kerosene burner with just enough oil to cover the wrenches and let it burn off. Think I got it?


Yah, I should have bought better wrenches to start with but I was not sure it was going to work out. I havent
used them yet so I dont want to hurt my bercides shoulder patting myself on the back till I actually adjust a valve with them.
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1985 Euro 300TD 5 spd 220K
1985 Euro 240D 5 spd 130K
1979 240D 5 spd, 40K on engine rebuild
1994 Dodge/Cummins, 5 spd, 121K
1964 Allice Chalmers D15 tractor
2014 Kubota L3800 tractor
1964 VW bug

"Lifes too short to drive a boring car"
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Old 03-06-2003, 09:18 PM
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I think you need to use the hard soap instead of liquid detergent...
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  #5  
Old 03-07-2003, 11:03 AM
zat
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It's been many years since I spent time in the old blacksmith shop but as I recall heating steel to cherry red followed by a quick quench in oil (for oil hardending steel ) or water (for water hardening steel) will harden the material. Tempering would follow the hardening process and involves torch heating the tang end of the tool and watching for color change in the material. Color varies from blue (hardest) to straw yellow (soft) but I believe this all depends on the amount of carbon in the steel.
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Old 03-07-2003, 11:06 AM
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Zat & Leathermang

Thanks for the help. I will be heading out to the shop after breakfast to give it a shot. I am in the midst of a major shop clean out and re organization. Man do I hate to throw stuff out but do I really need a pile of left over trim from building the house or manuals on long dead tools taking up space? Putting casters on woodworking tools has helped allot. Have a good Friday.
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1985 Euro 300TD 5 spd 220K
1985 Euro 240D 5 spd 130K
1979 240D 5 spd, 40K on engine rebuild
1994 Dodge/Cummins, 5 spd, 121K
1964 Allice Chalmers D15 tractor
2014 Kubota L3800 tractor
1964 VW bug

"Lifes too short to drive a boring car"
Reply With Quote
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