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  #1  
Old 05-08-2007, 04:38 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Woolwich, Maine
Posts: 3,597
1986 190E 2.3-16 Chain Guide Rail Replacement

A question concerning the replacement of the chain guide rails - can this job be done with the head on the car, or is it required to remove the head to get the main rail and the lower guide out? What about the intermediate rail below in the intake camshaft sprocket?

We have a unit that is eating these items. It ate the guide below the intake camshaft sprocket about two years ago and that caused all kinds of problems with oil pressure. We removed the remnants from the oil pan and the oil pump suction strainer and things returned pretty close to normal. It seems at about the same time we have developed a means for gasoline to mix with the engine oil which also adversely affects the idle oil pressure and the characteristics of the oil, so this car gets lots of oil changes while we try to figure that item out.

Today we noticed some rattling noises from the front of the engine and took the valve cover off, only to notice the main tensioning rail (on the exhaust camshaft side of the engine and it is the rail in contact with the chain tensioner) was worn away to the point where the sides of the rail protrude past the chain at the top of the rail. The chain is still reasonably tight but it would seem this item is due for replacement.

So, can this job be done without removing the head? While we are in there we would also like to replace the oil pump.

Any input would be welcome. Jim

__________________
Own:
1986 Euro 190E 2.3-16 (291,000 miles),
1998 E300D TurboDiesel, 231,000 miles -purchased with 45,000,
1988 300E 5-speed 252,000 miles,
1983 240D 4-speed, purchased w/136,000, now with 222,000 miles.
2009 ML320CDI Bluetec, 89,000 miles

Owned:
1971 220D (250,000 miles plus, sold to father-in-law),
1975 240D (245,000 miles - died of body rot),
1991 350SD (176,560 miles, weakest Benz I have owned),
1999 C230 Sport (45,400 miles),
1982 240D (321,000 miles, put to sleep)
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  #2  
Old 05-08-2007, 06:51 PM
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Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 143
No.
At first glance,one might think it could be pulled off...but nope..
Prob is that the tensioner guides on a lower sort of fulcrum pin,and this will in effect together with the lenght of the tensioner make a swap a no can do as you won´t be able to get the tensioner either in or out really.

A word of advice.
The OEM headbolts in plain english sux.
Have them swapped for a set of M12*110 allen of 12.9 quality.
Torq head to 10kgm...have the engine heat cycled a couple of times and retorq the head again.
You will NEVER have a blown headgasket EVER again.

Pumps seldom go awol on the 102 engine.
What does is the pressure relief valve.
Reason being that someone didn´t do their homework as merc as the plunger(piston) is out of stainless and it registers and runs in a cast aluminium housing-which over time will make the pressure relief valve gall-which will make it stick-and always half way of course.
Easy to remedy though.
Just ram a piece of wood up the fabled behind of the relief valve and smear it with some fine valve cutting compound and go at it.
Couple of time up and down does it,and be sure to clean the bore out with the degreaser as you´re done.

As for the fuelwash...
Depending of the amount of money you´re willing to part with...toss the POS KE out of there and go stand alone.
You´ll never look back.
Trust me on that.
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  #3  
Old 05-10-2007, 06:39 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Woolwich, Maine
Posts: 3,597
Thanks. So today the we mined our way to the head, and should have the head off before the weekend. My next quandry is, I really don't want to drop the transmission, but I need to lock the crank to get the crank pully and dynamic balancer bolt out to remove them. I figure this is going to be a pain the hiney as that bolt gets a serious torque value (220 or so ft.-lbs) and is likely in there pretty good by now. Putting that kind of load on the transmission and clutch is a bit of a concern. Seems the whole system is intended to take about that number, but if breaking it loose take twice as much, are we likely to damage something?

Thanks, Jim
__________________
Own:
1986 Euro 190E 2.3-16 (291,000 miles),
1998 E300D TurboDiesel, 231,000 miles -purchased with 45,000,
1988 300E 5-speed 252,000 miles,
1983 240D 4-speed, purchased w/136,000, now with 222,000 miles.
2009 ML320CDI Bluetec, 89,000 miles

Owned:
1971 220D (250,000 miles plus, sold to father-in-law),
1975 240D (245,000 miles - died of body rot),
1991 350SD (176,560 miles, weakest Benz I have owned),
1999 C230 Sport (45,400 miles),
1982 240D (321,000 miles, put to sleep)
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  #4  
Old 05-10-2007, 06:55 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Woolwich, Maine
Posts: 3,597
Racing,

Is 10kgm equal to about 72 ft-lbs? Seems to be by just converting kg to pounds and meters to feet and multiplying it out. 72 ft.-lbs seems a little light for a head bolt.

Also, I have been checking sources for these bolts, which I take are 12mm diameter and 110mm long with a grade 12.9 steel alloy. Did I get that right? Thanks, Jim
__________________
Own:
1986 Euro 190E 2.3-16 (291,000 miles),
1998 E300D TurboDiesel, 231,000 miles -purchased with 45,000,
1988 300E 5-speed 252,000 miles,
1983 240D 4-speed, purchased w/136,000, now with 222,000 miles.
2009 ML320CDI Bluetec, 89,000 miles

Owned:
1971 220D (250,000 miles plus, sold to father-in-law),
1975 240D (245,000 miles - died of body rot),
1991 350SD (176,560 miles, weakest Benz I have owned),
1999 C230 Sport (45,400 miles),
1982 240D (321,000 miles, put to sleep)
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  #5  
Old 05-11-2007, 03:27 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 143
Jim.
http://www.102983.org/gallery/thumbnails.php?album=lastupby&uid=3

On there you´ll find numerous pics of various stuff off the 102.983 engine.
Check it out as some at least might be of help and service.

As for the crank bolt.
Unbolt the crank pulley.
Install a pair of M8 bolts as deep as they go that are to long.
Put a breaker bar between these two throw away bolts(they´ll be as you´re done)
Now let the breaker bar rest against the frame member and go at it with a 27mm socket at the crank bolt.
Be sure you have the breaker as close to the dampner as you can for less leverage on the two M8s.

Install is the reverse of removal,and make DAMN sure you tighten the center bolts per spec.

If need be pick up a dampner puller for one of the domestic engines(V8) as these will fit the 102 motor as well-and what´s more is that i bet they can be had dirt cheap at your local NAPA or similar.

12.9 bolts are a euro nomer.There´s really no equivalent in "grade" form,and the closest you´ll get is the lower settings of NAS/AN.
IOW,the 12.9s are some serious fasteners,and their torq yield depends on lenght of course.If memory serves me they indeed are 10kgm.
Yes,the 12mm of 110 lenght is correct.Don´t forget to put the OEM headbolt washers on them though.

When it comes to getting the head off.
Only thing that might get you into trouble is the water pipe that has to come out that is bolted to the head inside of the thermostat housing.
Thermostat housing...
Be careful.
Unbolt the 4 M8s for it and losen the worm clamps for the transfer hose to the pump.
Then pry/rotate the thermo housing gently...persuade it...and it´ll come off.
Thing is that it´s sealed with an o-ring that might have corrosion on it..and if you go overboard with force the transfer tube taht goes in the head might break off.

When getting the transfer tube out.
DO NOT PULL ON IT.
Get a pair of vise grips and gently rotate it back and forth while excerting a SMALL amount of pulling for every time going back and forth..and it´ll come out.
Again...amount of pulling force on both these cast aluminium pieces to be held to a minimum.


Man vill HAVE to come down.
At least a little bit,point being that the oil pump strainer is bolted to a bracket that sits on one of the main bearing saddles.
An M8 nut that needs to be unbolted-IOW you at least need to get you hand into the oilsump with a 13mm wrench to reach it.
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  #6  
Old 05-11-2007, 09:45 AM
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Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Woolwich, Maine
Posts: 3,597
Racing,

Thanks for the advice. That is some 16-valve you have. I can't read the language, but it looks like it is turbocharged and intercooled and that you did everything, from turning the pistons down to installing a different oil pump and drive.

Are you saying I will have to remove the transmission to enable me to drop the oil pan and remove and clean the oil strainer?

We got the thermostat housing off, along with the coolant pipe that goes through the chain box without damaging either. This is the third 190e 2.3-16 we have taken the head off of, and the first to get that pipe out cleanly. The other two it just broke off and we had to knock it out of the head once the head was off.

Is there a site or reference material for taking the front cover off? I am imagining a bunch of the rotating items inside the chainbox area are supported at the block and the front cover. I would hate to find out I broke a bunch of items by pulling the cover off out of sequence. The manuals I have are not very specific - the MB manual is only for the items that are different from the regular 190E 2.3. Apparently this cover is not.

When we got the pipe out of the chainbox I got a glimpse of the rail. It is eaten away down to the point where the tensioner contacts it. The chain itself looks fine, but the tensioner rail now has two "ears" that the chain passes between. I am wondering just what might have caused this. Any ideas? I want to make sure I fix it when I put the engine back together.

Well, thanks for the link to the site, I enjoyed the photos. How fast is that turbocharged and intercooled machine?

Jim
__________________
Own:
1986 Euro 190E 2.3-16 (291,000 miles),
1998 E300D TurboDiesel, 231,000 miles -purchased with 45,000,
1988 300E 5-speed 252,000 miles,
1983 240D 4-speed, purchased w/136,000, now with 222,000 miles.
2009 ML320CDI Bluetec, 89,000 miles

Owned:
1971 220D (250,000 miles plus, sold to father-in-law),
1975 240D (245,000 miles - died of body rot),
1991 350SD (176,560 miles, weakest Benz I have owned),
1999 C230 Sport (45,400 miles),
1982 240D (321,000 miles, put to sleep)
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  #7  
Old 05-12-2007, 03:32 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 143
Jim.
I build them.
It´s what i do.
So..there´s been several over the last couple of yrs.
Mine has run the quarter in low 11s approx,but new motor is coming up shortly that puts out more power.
Hope for new engine to pass 650hp on the boost.

Timing chain cover.
Only thing that registers on the front cover is the axle/gear for the distributor really.
This isn´t something to be conserned of as long as you´ve released the tenstion of the chain.

Reasons for the chain eating the guide alive are either that the chain guide plastic material has gotten old and deteriorated over time or that the tensioner has go ape rendering a WAY to high pressure on the chain.
This is turn CAN be a function of a stuck pressure relief valve,and if so this will mainly be a prob with cold engine-as oilpressure can go through the roof in such scenarios.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wnm5Pg6ceaw

Last edited by Racing; 05-13-2007 at 03:34 AM.
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  #8  
Old 05-12-2007, 07:46 AM
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Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Woolwich, Maine
Posts: 3,597
Racing,

Thanks for the information once again. I will take some photos of the tensioner/guide rail this afternoon and post them.

I gather the revised inlet ducting in some of the photos is for the new engine? 650 hp from that basic engine volume and mass sounds like it is pushing the envelop of the materials. Do you make significant modifications to the cooling system as well?

We don't have a garage and it rained a bit yesterday so we are behind schedule by half a day or so. Today is looking a bit nicer, but we have rain forcast again for tomorrow. Wil try to have the head off today.

Great shots of the car performing in the video. I think I saw your machine with the red valve cover in the one showing a 2.5-16 Evolution II event at Hockenheim that came up after your video. I thought I recognized not just the red valve cover but the exhaust header/turbo installation.

Thanks again, Jim
__________________
Own:
1986 Euro 190E 2.3-16 (291,000 miles),
1998 E300D TurboDiesel, 231,000 miles -purchased with 45,000,
1988 300E 5-speed 252,000 miles,
1983 240D 4-speed, purchased w/136,000, now with 222,000 miles.
2009 ML320CDI Bluetec, 89,000 miles

Owned:
1971 220D (250,000 miles plus, sold to father-in-law),
1975 240D (245,000 miles - died of body rot),
1991 350SD (176,560 miles, weakest Benz I have owned),
1999 C230 Sport (45,400 miles),
1982 240D (321,000 miles, put to sleep)
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  #9  
Old 05-12-2007, 03:36 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Woolwich, Maine
Posts: 3,597
Racing,

We tried the method you described for the crank pulley removal and I will post some photos tonight. The bolts are M6, not M8 on this unit (it is a 1985 Euro model) and so we fashioned a strongback that we bolted to the face of the balancer and reacted the torque on the frame rail just below the self leveling system hydraulic flud reservoir (took it out of the way). That worked, but that was no 200 ft.-lbs. What is the procedure for putting that thing back in there?

The next problem is the balancer is not one piece. The outer half came out, loose, not even attached to the inner part. No signs of any metal distress at the metal bore in the center, it just looks like it was always two pieces. Is this normal? I think we will have to buy a new one by the looks of things. But, now how does the inner half come out? Looks like a very tight fit. I will post a photo of the part that came out later too.

I can see the sleeve with the woodruff key in it inside the bore through the chainbox housing cover. Looks like a very tight fit. I tried tapping lightly on the half of the balancer that is still there and it doesn't seem to be interested in suggesting it might be loose.

Well, got to go back and try some more stuff. Jim
__________________
Own:
1986 Euro 190E 2.3-16 (291,000 miles),
1998 E300D TurboDiesel, 231,000 miles -purchased with 45,000,
1988 300E 5-speed 252,000 miles,
1983 240D 4-speed, purchased w/136,000, now with 222,000 miles.
2009 ML320CDI Bluetec, 89,000 miles

Owned:
1971 220D (250,000 miles plus, sold to father-in-law),
1975 240D (245,000 miles - died of body rot),
1991 350SD (176,560 miles, weakest Benz I have owned),
1999 C230 Sport (45,400 miles),
1982 240D (321,000 miles, put to sleep)
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  #10  
Old 05-12-2007, 06:51 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Woolwich, Maine
Posts: 3,597
Ok, we got the other half of the balancer out and will take some photos. My issue is I don't know how the two halves fit together to be balanced, so I guess I am looking at a new one.

We are also not able to get the Woodruff key out. Don't want to mar the end of the crank and don't want to mess up the key. Is there a technique for this? I guess all the ones I am used to were too loose as this one is in there tight.

Well, we will have the head off in a few hours. I forgot to send this and now the head is off. Damage to the chain tensioner and rail was astounding and there was a residue of ground aluminum settled in all the head bolt and other socket headed capscrews.

Photos in a minute. Jim
__________________
Own:
1986 Euro 190E 2.3-16 (291,000 miles),
1998 E300D TurboDiesel, 231,000 miles -purchased with 45,000,
1988 300E 5-speed 252,000 miles,
1983 240D 4-speed, purchased w/136,000, now with 222,000 miles.
2009 ML320CDI Bluetec, 89,000 miles

Owned:
1971 220D (250,000 miles plus, sold to father-in-law),
1975 240D (245,000 miles - died of body rot),
1991 350SD (176,560 miles, weakest Benz I have owned),
1999 C230 Sport (45,400 miles),
1982 240D (321,000 miles, put to sleep)
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  #11  
Old 05-12-2007, 10:32 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Woolwich, Maine
Posts: 3,597
Ok, here are some photos from the day's work. First is a shot of the bent M6 hex head screws we used with a 0.750" diameter iron pipe to restrain the crank. This didn't work at all, and actually caused the chain to slip a few teeth on the camshaft as the screws bent so much the crank.

The next is a shot of the strongback we made from a piece of flat bar. We made a template of the two bolt holes from the dynamic balancer and then made a pad using a bit of scrap plywood and a tip of the flat bar we cut off, for the strongback to bear on on the right side frame rail, under the spot the self levelling system hydaulic oil reservoir sits.

We then had to make stacks of washers act as spacers since the only M6 bolts I had were longer ones, with a pair of 0.375" nuts, one on each of the two bolts, acting as spacers to make a stand off for the lip feature on the dynamic balancer. We tightened the screws into the dynamic balancer by hand. We used a Sears Craftsman 24" breaker bar with a 0.500" drive, which we slipped a 1.0" diameter 3 foot long extension pipe over. This worked, but still bent the fasteners slightly, and, unlike the "stretch bolts" in the head, this big bear didn't just "pop" loose. It took about half a turn to relax the stretch on that thing.

More to come. Jim
Attached Thumbnails
1986 190E 2.3-16 Chain Guide Rail Replacement-first_attempt_did_little_but_bend_bolts.jpg   1986 190E 2.3-16 Chain Guide Rail Replacement-revised_strongback_to_lock_crank.jpg  
__________________
Own:
1986 Euro 190E 2.3-16 (291,000 miles),
1998 E300D TurboDiesel, 231,000 miles -purchased with 45,000,
1988 300E 5-speed 252,000 miles,
1983 240D 4-speed, purchased w/136,000, now with 222,000 miles.
2009 ML320CDI Bluetec, 89,000 miles

Owned:
1971 220D (250,000 miles plus, sold to father-in-law),
1975 240D (245,000 miles - died of body rot),
1991 350SD (176,560 miles, weakest Benz I have owned),
1999 C230 Sport (45,400 miles),
1982 240D (321,000 miles, put to sleep)
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  #12  
Old 05-12-2007, 10:46 PM
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Woolwich, Maine
Posts: 3,597
Here are some shots as the damage to the chain guide rail became more visible and apparent. With every removed item the view became scarier.

There is also a view of the number two and number three pistons and cylinder bores. The cylinder bores look to be in amazingly good condition. There was a lot of flakey black soot in there, which left some crumbly ash after I wiped it out. I will be rolling the engine over a few times to clean out the crevice between the piston and cylinder and trying to polish the stain away at the top of the cylinder bore. There is no wear lip or any other sign of anything bad in the piston to cylinder interface.

Another set of photos coming to show the split dynamic balancer. Jim
Attached Thumbnails
1986 190E 2.3-16 Chain Guide Rail Replacement-first_view_of_chain_guide_damage_through_coolant_tube_penetration.jpg   1986 190E 2.3-16 Chain Guide Rail Replacement-view_of_damage_to_guide_rail_and_head_chain_box_after_cams_are_out_of_head.jpg   1986 190E 2.3-16 Chain Guide Rail Replacement-close_up_of_eaten_away_chaing_guide_rail.jpg   1986 190E 2.3-16 Chain Guide Rail Replacement-cylinder_bores_look_pretty_good.jpg   1986 190E 2.3-16 Chain Guide Rail Replacement-chain_tensioner_damage_from_wear_by_chain.jpg  

__________________
Own:
1986 Euro 190E 2.3-16 (291,000 miles),
1998 E300D TurboDiesel, 231,000 miles -purchased with 45,000,
1988 300E 5-speed 252,000 miles,
1983 240D 4-speed, purchased w/136,000, now with 222,000 miles.
2009 ML320CDI Bluetec, 89,000 miles

Owned:
1971 220D (250,000 miles plus, sold to father-in-law),
1975 240D (245,000 miles - died of body rot),
1991 350SD (176,560 miles, weakest Benz I have owned),
1999 C230 Sport (45,400 miles),
1982 240D (321,000 miles, put to sleep)
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  #13  
Old 05-12-2007, 11:22 PM
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Woolwich, Maine
Posts: 3,597
The first shot in the post above is the view I got after pulling the coolant tube that passes through the chain box into the head proper from the thermostat housing. Hard to see but that shiny, worn metal is the first sign of how deeply the chain guide rail composite material had been worn away. The next shows the view from above after the camshafts have been removed. The "ears" of the chain guide rail are visible in the foreground and the chain rubbing the head casting are visible at the top of the photo. It is not in focus, but the 6mm socket head capscrew at the top of the photo, just beneath the rub marks on the casting, is also damaged from contact with the chain.

The next view is the clearest, which is with the head off the block. The chain guide rail is essentially worn away. There was a lot of aluminum wear particulate in the sockets of the capscrews and head bolts.

The cylinder bores were described above, and the worn chain tensioner tip in the last photo is obvious.

Next are the photos of each side of the dynamic balancer that is split. The first two show the faces of the outer half. The next two show the two faces of the inner half.

We still have to get the power steering pump and air condtioning compressor supprt bracket off the front cover, and then remove the front cover and see what we see.

We bunged up a head bolt, but since Racing suggests we use some other fasteners anyway, that isn't a big deal. So far so good, didn't break anything else of value, that we know of yet. We will be replacing the water pump just because it makes no sense not to, the engine has over 150,000 miles on it.

Jim
Attached Thumbnails
1986 190E 2.3-16 Chain Guide Rail Replacement-outer_half_of_dynamic_balancer-side-facing-forward-mates-iwth-pulley.jpg   1986 190E 2.3-16 Chain Guide Rail Replacement-outer_half_of_dynamic_balancer_side_facing_the_inner_half.jpg   1986 190E 2.3-16 Chain Guide Rail Replacement-inner_half_of_dynamic_balancer_side_facing_the_front_half.jpg   1986 190E 2.3-16 Chain Guide Rail Replacement-inner_half_of_the_dynamic_balancer_aft_face_away_from_outer_half.jpg  
__________________
Own:
1986 Euro 190E 2.3-16 (291,000 miles),
1998 E300D TurboDiesel, 231,000 miles -purchased with 45,000,
1988 300E 5-speed 252,000 miles,
1983 240D 4-speed, purchased w/136,000, now with 222,000 miles.
2009 ML320CDI Bluetec, 89,000 miles

Owned:
1971 220D (250,000 miles plus, sold to father-in-law),
1975 240D (245,000 miles - died of body rot),
1991 350SD (176,560 miles, weakest Benz I have owned),
1999 C230 Sport (45,400 miles),
1982 240D (321,000 miles, put to sleep)
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 05-13-2007, 04:15 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 143
Jim.
There´s supposed to be a black coloured "sleeve" behind the balancer on the crank snout.Has a recess for the woodruff as well.This sleeve is imperative as it goes between the dampner and the chain gear and it is the drive for the oilpump.(Hence why the torq of the center bolt is so important)

However,i´ve personaly never seen a balancer like yours.
All the ones i´ve ever seen has sort of a protruding center where the pulley bolts up,and they have all sported 8mm allen bolts to keep the pulley in place.
So..in essence,that pulley of yours beats me at least.

PS/AC bracket.
This can be a real creeper...
Thing is,at the bottom of it(longside) there´s a recess that hides a long ass M8 bolt away.Sort of towards the front of the engine,fairly low.
What ads insult to injury is that this recess often gets filled with crud over time making the bolt head more or less invisible,but rest assured...it´s there for you to find.Easiest way to clean it out is by compressed air really.
Bracket can be either cast aluminium or detroit wonder metal.
On an 85 though it´s most likely aluminium.
Oil cooler hardlines need to be shifted a little to get the bracket out of harms way.Just use your pry bar for this as the hardlines are out of common black steel(altho anodized) and will take the minute leverage needed with a breeze.

Bigger issue though is all of the aluminium residue and shrapnel within the oiling sys of the engine.
Get the oilfilter out.
Use a plastic bag of some sorts,wrap it over your one hand and take it out.
Go aside,so not to mess up everything in sight.
Let it drip off a little.
Now pry the element apart.Crevis by crevis.
Check the amount of residue and left over in total.Anything more than a tea spoon full= deep up **** creek.
Oil filters are cheap,but the main problem here isn´t the filter....but the cooler.
Openings of the cooler element are VERY small,and it won´t take much for small amounts of parts/crud to slam the openings shut.Which upon reassy can decide to come lose at any time down the line.
What makes the issue worse is that the cooler is there right by the filter housing and ports for it,leaving you with a situation where the cooler WILL take the first hit with engine warmed up.
Long story short,you´re out an oilcooler.No two ways about it.
If you wanna save a buck or two try looking a "Setrab" up instead as the OEM Behr are an arm and a leg.Wild guess is that a Setrab one is approx 1/3 the cost of the OEM one-and frankly just as good.(Setrab is OEM for ferrari for instance).In such a scenario,count on looking a hydraulic vendor up to get new hoses and fittings.

Now for the culprit.
Obviously something´s had the tension of the chain go ape,because no matter the plunger in itself isn´t supposed to go far enough for the damage seen to happen.By half way approx it´s supposed to be far "over edge" as far as any control of it at least.
This also points to that you must have heard large amounts of racket on startup especially-before the pressure hit the tensioner.(Cold engine)

Further,seing the amount of residue....
Jim.
This is going to take some brass balls,but there really only one option here.
Clean what´s been mentioned out to the best of your capacity.Especially so the bore of the oilpressure relief valve.
Pick a number of oilfilters up.
Pan HAS to come completely off for you to;
a/clean it out completely.
b/clean any residue off the crank case walls with common engine degreaser
c/Clean the rest of the engine out to the best of your capacity.

DO NOT AFTER RINSE WITH ANYTHING THOUGH.
Just liberal amounts of petroleum based engine degreaser.A brush certainly helps.

As you have the front timing cover off,just bolt the oilpump apart and be done with it.Check for wear and end play of pump.If "lid" of pump is full of marks,this can be handled easily by simply trueing it against a known flat surface-like a piece of glass.
If you use emery cloth,spray alcohol of some sort at it to keep it moist and to prevent the aluminium from sludging the paper up.

Pickup tube...again...engine degreaser to the point of diminishing returns.

My bet is that a stuck oilpressure relief valve caused this.

..and in all honesty...
One thing that is DIRT cheap for these engines is the late style con rod bolts.
As you have the pan off anyways it would be pure folly not to take the caps off the conrods to have a look at the condition of the conrod bearings at least.
If the conrods are the early style you won´t need new nuts n bolts,just reuse what´s there and torq to 60Nm.
Early style have nuts pointing towards you(14mm socket if memory serves me) and the later ones 12 pointed 10mm bolts.
If the conrods of your motor are the early variety....smile...cause those rods will take more or less anything you throw at ém..(They´re about twice as beefy as the later ones)

If the later variety bolts you absolutely NEED to replace them,but as noted they´re dirt cheap-and you order them by the piece.
Likewise,conrod bearings ain´t an arm and a leg either.

Reasons for doing this is plentyfold.
Major one being that you´ve had crud running through the engine and the conrod bearings are the ones that always takes the hardest hit from any perspective really.

All 8 conrod bolts/nuts can be accessed with the motor in place.There´s even sort of two small reccesses in the front crossmember for the extension shafts needed for your torq wrench.(No 2 and 3 cyl)
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  #15  
Old 05-13-2007, 09:02 AM
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Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Woolwich, Maine
Posts: 3,597
Racing,

Thanks for the time to post such a detailed response. I am struggling with how to get the oil pan off without taking the transmission down. The car is "on the ground" so to speak, meaning it is sitting on the tires and we use a floor jack to lift it now and then to get under it. Dropping the transmission is almost out of the question now.

We can probably get the oil pan down a few inches by disconnecting the engine mounts and trying to block the engine up, I suppose.

As for the oil system, this car has been on Mobil 1, 5W-40 (sold here as Delvac 1, a Diesel engine oil with additives for keeping the soot in suspension) for quite some time, like the last 20,000 or so miles, changed every 5,000 miles or less. We have had a problem with gasoline getting into the oil, and as of late the car has had oil changes every 2,500 miles. That turns out to be leaking injectors. My son has the car at school in Indiana and we live in Connecticut. We have been looking at the oil filters and have not noticed a lot of serious crud in the past, but will take this one out and check it carefully. We usually change the oil hot, and I have the last discarded oil change (about 1,100 miles ago).

I will go outside and try to take a photo of the woodruff key, as well as try to find the part numbers for the dampner(s) and the pulley. Maybe I can track them down that way. The first owner of this car was from California and drove it in local road races and the like at one of the tracks near Los Angeles. It is possible he put something peculiar on it.

If I take the oil cooler out and send it to a local repair shop and ask them to flow solvent through it, would that be of any use?

So, my next big challenge before I can respond to the lower end work you recommended is getting the oil pan off. I will have to study that for a while.

Thanks again for the help, Jim

__________________
Own:
1986 Euro 190E 2.3-16 (291,000 miles),
1998 E300D TurboDiesel, 231,000 miles -purchased with 45,000,
1988 300E 5-speed 252,000 miles,
1983 240D 4-speed, purchased w/136,000, now with 222,000 miles.
2009 ML320CDI Bluetec, 89,000 miles

Owned:
1971 220D (250,000 miles plus, sold to father-in-law),
1975 240D (245,000 miles - died of body rot),
1991 350SD (176,560 miles, weakest Benz I have owned),
1999 C230 Sport (45,400 miles),
1982 240D (321,000 miles, put to sleep)
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