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  #16  
Old 08-02-2004, 10:24 PM
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I've got a few bets placed.

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  #17  
Old 08-02-2004, 10:27 PM
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BTW- I am taking a few off and heading out to my brothers ranch to challenge the fish to a debate instead of your guys, starting Wednesday - enjoy the break!
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  #18  
Old 08-03-2004, 01:49 AM
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Lightbulb

What ever happened to the North Slope oil? Going to Asia instead of the West Coast?

Good business or politics? Congress approved sending it to Asia some years ago.
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  #19  
Old 08-03-2004, 02:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by KirkVining
BTW- I am taking a few off and heading out to my brothers ranch to challenge the fish to a debate instead of your guys, starting Wednesday - enjoy the break!
Have a good one. Some of us will miss you and have to stand up for ourselves now!
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  #20  
Old 08-03-2004, 07:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Botnst
Invest offshore rigs. We still have stacked land rigs between here and New Iberia.

At fifty a barrel, deep drilling near-shore will become increasingly attractive and shallow drilling far offshore will aslo be increasingly viable. Also, smaller pockets that were capped will now be worth rpoducing. Also rehabing old low production fields will become more interesting. Oil field services, in other words. You know, Halliburton!

Look for speculators offering to buy your inherited interest in a non-productive field.

B
Hey Bot,
Bet you don't know much about this, do you? Hehe.

I'm not intimately connected to the awlbiz like I used to be so this is sheer speculation but, it seems like some fairly extensive infill drilling is taking place on the coastal plains east of Austin...I've always viewed that as the thin end of the rig count wedge because is the cheapest, least risky way to get more oil out on a near-term basis. It also fits in with your scenario above of reentering low production holes for rework (not actually drilling).

Remember in the late 80s , early 90s when there was alot of coil tubing work going on with contractors using old Trinity sands holes and whipstocking out at the level of the Austin chalk? I wonder if all that's gone now?
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  #21  
Old 08-03-2004, 07:52 AM
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Fresh off the press:

oil prices

I'll bet you have never met a large mouth bass you did not like KV. Enjoy the fishing.
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  #22  
Old 08-03-2004, 09:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by R Leo
Hey Bot,
Bet you don't know much about this, do you? Hehe.

I'm not intimately connected to the awlbiz like I used to be so this is sheer speculation but, it seems like some fairly extensive infill drilling is taking place on the coastal plains east of Austin...I've always viewed that as the thin end of the rig count wedge because is the cheapest, least risky way to get more oil out on a near-term basis. It also fits in with your scenario above of reentering low production holes for rework (not actually drilling).

Remember in the late 80s , early 90s when there was alot of coil tubing work going on with contractors using old Trinity sands holes and whipstocking out at the level of the Austin chalk? I wonder if all that's gone now?
Back when I worked in the indusrty (waaay back, I was there before 3d seismic), we re-shot that ENE of Austin (south of Corsicana) up to just north of the Red River. Looooong parallel lines looking (as I recall) down to around 20,000 ft. I don't know that anybody ever drilled that deep in that area but we got good clean records to that depth--I know that because our client made us re-shoot if records weren't good to that depth.

Another area to watch are the old Kilgore/Longview fields. They were essentially destroyed by overproduction, there is supposedly still plenty of oil down there its just not economical to produce it.

So I think as prices go high and become stable, you'll see drilling in previously marginal areas and depths; services companies will pull-out all the various expensive tricks and methods for revamping old, saltwater fields; pumping oil that was too viscuous or sufur-rich to be economical, etc.

BTW, anybody here old enough to have traveled between Beaumont and Crystal Beach back when they used to flare wells? It was a strange, unworldly dim-yellow glow at night for miles and miles. Malodorous, hellish flickering light and roar of burning high pressure gases. Dante would've loved it.
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  #23  
Old 08-03-2004, 11:57 AM
Jake
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"BTW, anybody here old enough to have traveled between Beaumont and Crystal Beach back when they used to flare wells? It was a strange, unworldly dim-yellow glow at night for miles and miles. Malodorous, hellish flickering light and roar of burning high pressure gases. Dante would've loved it."

I grew up in Lake Charles and had relatives at High Ilsand. We used to go down the coast road and those flares were something to see. We also used to have flares and "pop-offs" in LC all the time from the plants there. Back when I was a baby, the Hydrazine plant at Olin-Matheson blew up and broke windows for 20 miles. They took what was left of the process unit and bulldozed it in a corner and built a dirt berm around it. It was still there 19 years later when I was working as a pipefitter there.
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  #24  
Old 08-03-2004, 11:59 AM
Jake
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Kirt:

don't know about the rig builders in Fort Worth, but I hear that there is a lot of activity from the oil guys in San Angelo and Victoria.............

should be lots of rework and deep drilling if this all comes to pass.

who knows, maybe the Ranger field might reopen.............
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  #25  
Old 08-03-2004, 12:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Botnst
Back when I worked in the indusrty (waaay back, I was there before 3d seismic), we re-shot that ENE of Austin (south of Corsicana) up to just north of the Red River. Looooong parallel lines looking (as I recall) down to around 20,000 ft. I don't know that anybody ever drilled that deep in that area but we got good clean records to that depth--I know that because our client made us re-shoot if records weren't good to that depth.

Another area to watch are the old Kilgore/Longview fields. They were essentially destroyed by overproduction, there is supposedly still plenty of oil down there its just not economical to produce it.

So I think as prices go high and become stable, you'll see drilling in previously marginal areas and depths; services companies will pull-out all the various expensive tricks and methods for revamping old, saltwater fields; pumping oil that was too viscuous or sufur-rich to be economical, etc.

BTW, anybody here old enough to have traveled between Beaumont and Crystal Beach back when they used to flare wells? It was a strange, unworldly dim-yellow glow at night for miles and miles. Malodorous, hellish flickering light and roar of burning high pressure gases. Dante would've loved it.
There is another big rumor that the oil companies have found that some of the Kilgore/Longview dead holes have essentially filled back up - may be black helicopter stuff, but I have heard it.

I was around during the days they flared away the nights - the ride from Lawton Oklahoma to Oklahoma City was exactly like that. Bet they wish they had it all back.

They flared a gas well not more than two miles from my house about two months ago for some reason - it was a spectacular site, and attracted a crowd. Made me think of those days. I had forgotten how much noise they make.
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  #26  
Old 08-03-2004, 12:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jake
"BTW, anybody here old enough to have traveled between Beaumont and Crystal Beach back when they used to flare wells? It was a strange, unworldly dim-yellow glow at night for miles and miles. Malodorous, hellish flickering light and roar of burning high pressure gases. Dante would've loved it."

I grew up in Lake Charles and had relatives at High Ilsand. We used to go down the coast road and those flares were something to see. We also used to have flares and "pop-offs" in LC all the time from the plants there. Back when I was a baby, the Hydrazine plant at Olin-Matheson blew up and broke windows for 20 miles. They took what was left of the process unit and bulldozed it in a corner and built a dirt berm around it. It was still there 19 years later when I was working as a pipefitter there.
The most spectacular oil fire I have ever seen was here in Houston around 1992. They had a pipe that was 6' in diameter that ran under Buffalo Bayou carrying freshly made gasoline, and the damn thing blew up. They shut of the flow, but it took four days for what was in the pipe to burn. There is nothing like seeing balls of fire emerging from a river - it is unnatrual and surreal. At the time I lived on the far west side of Houston, and this fire was on the east side - and if looked east it looked like you had discovered the location of hell. It was an incredible site.

Another spectacular fire I've seen here in Texas wasn't oil related - Jake you may have saw this or heard of it, but in Ft Wuth back in the 80s they set up a July 4th fireworks display where the guys firing the rockets were located on opposite sides of the Trinity River, so the rockets would explode over the river in opposing arcs. One of the rockets misfired and literally shelled the opposite bank, making a direct hit in the pile of fireworks waiting to be fired. They all blew up at once, and the crowd, thinking it was part of the show, began cheering wildly, and wasn't until every firetruck in Ft Worth began to wail its way there that people started realizing something was wrong. It turned out to be a sad tragedy, the guy who fired the errant rocket killed his own father, and I believe one or two of his brothers were either killed or badly injured. But the ground bursts of the trailer load of fireworks and the resulting fire was one of the most incredible sites I've seen.
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  #27  
Old 08-03-2004, 03:06 PM
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Texas City had a big fireworks display, too.
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  #28  
Old 08-03-2004, 03:11 PM
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I heard about the fireworks debaucle, I wasn't around then. I spent the better part of the 80's jumping out of perfectly good aircraft.........

I lived in Minnesota for a while not long ago, and personal fireworks were against the law. The legislature passed a law while I was there ok'ing the sale of spaklers and other relatively harmless ground based fireworks. You should have heard and seen the hand wringing and teeth knashing. You would have thought someone proposed giving the chimps in the zoo loaded pistols...
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  #29  
Old 08-03-2004, 03:26 PM
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Ft Worth seems to have a knack for spectacular tragedy. A couple of years ago a tornado scored a direct hit on a downtown skyscraper - my kid gave me the tour of the damage, it looked like a ditchwitch dug a big trench across town ending in this 40 story building striped of windows. A couple of years before that, they had a spectacular hail storm that smashed every car in town - when you drove thru there everybody was drving cars that look like a team of crazy guys went after it with ball pean hammers. The glass shops were so backed up, all you can see in a traffic lane was miles of cars seemingly made out of duck tape, surrounded by buildings made out of plywood.
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  #30  
Old 08-03-2004, 04:15 PM
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You heard it from me first.

Anyone who is smart better be hedging on what happens when oil hits fifty. I think it is going to be there by Friday. It is a psychological ppoint that says $60 and up oil is a possibilty, something unthinkable a couple of weeks ago. In addition, when one compares the price of oil historically, it is currently cheap. It has not truly started to reflect basic supply and demand pressures until now - we are moving into a new age where we will be in bidding wars squeezed between two economies with have essentially given our national wealth to, the Saudis and the ChinoJapenese economy. We, ladies and gentlemen, are about to become their *****.

http://biz.yahoo.com/rb/040803/markets_oil_6.html

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