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  #1  
Old 02-09-2006, 02:29 PM
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Tech vs. Mech

What is the difference between a technician and a mechanic?

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  #2  
Old 02-09-2006, 02:33 PM
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Wow, this question will stir up an amazing amount of delightful responses.
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Old 02-09-2006, 03:05 PM
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The spelling.
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Old 02-09-2006, 03:30 PM
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In the context of YOUR question it's just a matter of terminology. I think that because of what Hollywood has done to the connotation of the word Mechanic, folks just tried to come up with something that didn't conjure up images of Goober.

In Europe automotive repair is a very respected profession. In this country, however, they are often thought of as Goobers. My Dad was/is a mechanic and a very smart and hard working guy. I have always despised the image that Hollywood has pinned on the automotive repair profession.

Today, for someone to be a good tech requires a lot of savvy. There are LOTS of guys out there who are good parts changers. What separates the real techs from the mechanics is the guys like Steve Brotherton who is a highly educated, smart and thoughtful auto troubleshooter. The modern automobile gets more complex with every model year and the parts changers are having a tougher and tougher time of it.

It really amazes me to see the number of "techs" who know so little about electricity, not to even mention electronics. There are also a surprising number of them who don't really understand basic engine theory. They get by because they can change parts fast thus making good commission money.
Not all of them fall in this category, however. I think that there is an increasing number of "techs" that have more understanding of modern automotive technology. At least I like to think so.

Have a great day,
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Old 02-09-2006, 03:30 PM
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It's the same as the difference between a 'clerk' and an 'associate'.
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Old 02-09-2006, 03:31 PM
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Technician sounds more general to me. Mechanic sounds more automobile-related. But a lot of mechanics call themselves technicians probably because it sounds more professional. It's the same reason why some programmers call themselves software engineers and some secretaries call themselves office managers.
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Old 02-09-2006, 03:37 PM
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Maybe $10-$15 per hour?
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Old 02-09-2006, 03:37 PM
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I think the terminology speaks to "progress", if you want to call it that. Fifty years ago, mechanics were required to repair and maintain vehicles. Now, mechanical knowledge alone doesn't cut it. A technician is required to diagnose electronic issues that may have little or nothing to do directly with mechanical issues.
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Old 02-09-2006, 05:21 PM
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It's about the same as the difference between a Sanitation Engineer and a Garbage man.

John Roncallo
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  #10  
Old 02-09-2006, 05:25 PM
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Beats me, I've been one for many years now, but I still don't know. Technician sounds good when filling out paperwork like loan apps, but around the campfire, I'm just a mechanic.

MV
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Old 02-09-2006, 05:48 PM
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Myself, I get the impression that a "Tech" posesses some skills when it comes to using a scanner, and has a good idea about electric circuits. A mechanic, being related to the word mechanical, gives me the impression that there are few (if any) electrical devices in involved, and that the whole process leans more towards physical diagnosis and disassembly/assembly (with all of it's intricacies).

However, I usually don't think about it, and frequently interchange the two terms.
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Old 02-09-2006, 06:20 PM
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I've answered to both (and worse) over the years.
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Old 02-09-2006, 06:23 PM
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The same difference as between an "environmental engineer" and a "Janitor".
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  #14  
Old 02-09-2006, 06:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Delor
Myself, I get the impression that a "Tech" posesses some skills when it comes to using a scanner, and has a good idea about electric circuits. A mechanic, being related to the word mechanical, gives me the impression that there are few (if any) electrical devices in involved, and that the whole process leans more towards physical diagnosis and disassembly/assembly (with all of it's intricacies).

However, I usually don't think about it, and frequently interchange the two terms.
I think your on to something there.

tech·ni·cian

n.
An expert in a technique, as:
a. One whose occupation requires training in a specific technical process: an electronics technician; an automotive technician.
b. One who is known for skill in an intellectual or artistic technique.


me·chan·ic
n.
A worker skilled in making, using, or repairing machines, vehicles, and tools.
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Old 02-09-2006, 06:42 PM
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So an automotive technician is a mechanic who works on modern cars with lots of electronics.

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