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  #1  
Old 03-04-2006, 11:21 PM
cmac2012's Avatar
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Coaxial cable -- ethernet extension

A guy I'm working for wants me to run a cable extension from his second floor added on office to his son's room at the other end of the house. The kid's on dial-up now.

I have no experience with running ethernet line. Is it just like cable TV coaxial cable or is a special grade required for ethernet? Would I just use a coaxial splitter on the incoming cable?

"I'm just a simple, country doctor, Jim..." (star trek)

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Last edited by cmac2012; 03-05-2006 at 12:29 AM.
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Old 03-05-2006, 12:49 AM
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Why don't you save the work of running lines and just distribute/share the connection with a wireless router? Those things have come down in price so much lately, I don't see the point of running a whole bunch of cables everywhere...wireless router and a wireless PCI card for your desktop or PCMCIA for your laptop would run you around $100US...furthermore, most laptops have wireless already built in...
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Old 03-05-2006, 12:53 AM
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You can use a splitter but then the son would have to get his own modem with IP address from the service provider. Other option is to run CAT5 cable from a router in the office to the son's PC, or maybe even wireless, since that stuff is pretty cheap.
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Old 03-05-2006, 01:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raymr
You can use a splitter but then the son would have to get his own modem with IP address from the service provider. Other option is to run CAT5 cable from a router in the office to the son's PC, or maybe even wireless, since that stuff is pretty cheap.
Now that's the stuff I didn't know. Wireless is looking better all the time. I know I've had some grief with wireless, however. Hardwire seems a lot more reliable.

Maybe I could just run the 8 wire modem connector line, what's that called?

I have a good route to run a wire, it would be some trouble but not out of the question.
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Old 03-05-2006, 01:16 AM
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if you want to run a line, don't run the coaxial line...run an ethernet line...if you go to your boss' office, you will see that the coaxial line connects to a cable modem, which in turn is connected to your boss' computer...what you want to do is buy a standard router...in this setup, the coaxial cable goes to the cable modem, the cable modem connects to the router, and the router splits the signal to all the computers...in this setup, you need an ethernet cable...what you want is an T-568A or T-568B ethernet cable with two RJ-45 heads on both ends...as long as the ethernet cable is not over 100M, it should be good for 100BASE-TX...run the ethernet cable, do NOT split the coaxial line...
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Old 03-05-2006, 01:16 PM
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I take it that the coaxil line is the cable input for the cable modem. That's not ethernet at all. You can split it, but to use the internet access from that cable will require another cable modem and another internet account with the cable company. Probably not what you want.

If you want to run ethernet, use unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) catagory 5 or better cable. There do exist two types of coaxil cable for ethernet, but both are seriousely outdated. The other option is wireless, of course.

Routers to share internet access are dirt-cheap now, and not too much more expensive if they also contain a wireless access point.
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Old 03-05-2006, 01:26 PM
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Don't bother running coaxial. I would have to agree depending on the distance it's probably cheapest and easiest to buy a wireless router and get wireless PCI card (Say $60 total or much cheaper if you wait for a rebate deal). They are inexpensive and are mostly trouble free unless you are paranoid about security, have insanely thick walls, or if you have a high WiFi usage from neighbors. If the guy you work with is in the oakland hills with 40 other nearby users then you can have a problem as some of my clients have experienced. If you can't see your neighbors then you'll be fine.

If you decide to hardwire which is more durable and is 100% trouble free run Cat5e (ethernet) or Cat6 into the walls use solid core wire but be sure to fasten the wire to the inside of the walls around dropoffs since the wire can snap under its own weight over several years. You can get Leviton Cat5e receptacles (all color coded) and faceplaces from an electronics supplier and you're set.
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Old 03-05-2006, 07:02 PM
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Excellent advice from all. I should have known somewhat that coaxial is not what I wanted to run. I've had to deal with ethernet port switches and various ethernet lines so I don't know what I was thinking about with the co-ax thing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by diametricalbenz
If you decide to hardwire which is more durable and is 100% trouble free run Cat5e (ethernet) or Cat6 into the walls use solid core wire but be sure to fasten the wire to the inside of the walls around dropoffs since the wire can snap under its own weight over several years. You can get Leviton Cat5e receptacles (all color coded) and faceplaces from an electronics supplier and you're set.
Good advice. I'd never thought about wires snapping under their own weight. Makes sense, over time. Copper's a lot softer than steel. Thanks for the specs on the receptacles. I'll look for that.
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Old 03-06-2006, 02:25 AM
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I forgot to make a correction I meant Cat5e to RJ45 plugs. You can get the receptacles that have the "586B" wiring schemes on them and you just lay the wires into the plugs and push down the cover which punches down all of the wires into the receptacle. That is much easier than having to spend money on a punchdown tool unless you plan to do this for more than one friend. Once that's done the receptacle snaps into the back of the faceplate and voila screw it into the wall. Fry's has all of that stuff but I doubt you'll want to drive 880 down to Fremont but they have everything there if a local place doesn't carry everything.

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