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  #1  
Old 08-25-2009, 08:08 AM
helpplease
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New clue to why the honey bees are dying

Hopefully they will be able to solve this problem soon a world without honey is a world I just don't want to be in......


http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,542361,00.html?test=latestnews
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  #2  
Old 08-25-2009, 09:10 AM
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Just something else I came across. Hopefully they can figure out the cause and a solution fast!

A Higher Load of Pathogens Linked to Colony Collapse Disorder
American Vegetable Grower
August 12, 2009
www.growingproduce.com

Viruses, bacteria, and fungi appear to have the strongest link with Colony Collapse Disorder found so far, according to a new study published by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and university scientists.

The study was headed by Pennsylvania State University entomologist Dennis vanEngelsdorp and entomologist Jeff Pettis, geneticist Jay Evans, and virologist Yanping Chen with the ARS Bee Research Laboratory in Beltsville, MD. The scientists looked at more than 200 variables in 91 colonies from 13 apiaries in Florida and California, two states where many beekeepers overwinter their honey bees. The researchers screened for factors such as bacteria, mites, Nosema (protozoan parasites), viruses, nutrition status and 171 crop protectants. Also sampled were adult bees, wax comb, beebread (stored and processed pollen), and brood.

Their findings showed that no single variable was found consistently in only those honey bee colonies that had Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). CCD is a syndrome denoted by the sudden disappearance of adult honey bees in a colony.This syndrome has been devastating some beekeepers in the U.S. and other places around the world.

According to the research, overall, CCD colonies were co-infected with a greater number of pathogens. About 55% of CCD colonies were infected with three or more viruses, compared to 28% of non-CCD colonies. The researchers also found detectable levels of residues from 50 crop protectants in all of the sampled colonies. There was no association between increased pesticide levels and CCD.

A report that summarizes research progress on CCD can be found at www.ars.usda.gov/is/br/ccd/ccd_progressreport.pdf

Source: USDA-ARS
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Old 08-25-2009, 09:12 AM
helpplease
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I am not sure how many people understand how important bees are to the agricultural industry other than just making sooo delicous honey.
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Old 08-25-2009, 09:21 AM
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Where I live the honey bees have been replaced in their niche by bumbles. I see more and more bumble bees as the competition from honey bees goes away.
I do miss the honey bees. I had a colony living in a hole in an outside wall under my porch for a few years. I never got any honey, but they were fascinating to watch.
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Old 08-25-2009, 10:44 AM
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Ww have been lucky over the past few years and haven't lost any hives.
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  #6  
Old 08-25-2009, 11:29 AM
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A few of my friends have lost all their bees this year.
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Old 08-25-2009, 11:31 AM
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Where in the hell is Bot? I'm sure he would have something worthwhile to add to this discussion.
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Old 08-25-2009, 12:25 PM
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We lost one of the 12 hives that were set up here some time ago. The rest are pretty much flourising.

The beekeeper delivered 12 jars of honey to the house the other day... It's like a years supply!
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Old 08-25-2009, 12:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KarTek View Post
We lost one of the 12 hives that were set up here some time ago. The rest are pretty much flourising.

The beekeeper delivered 12 jars of honey to the house the other day... It's like a years supply!

Yeah one hive is no big deal...sometimes it just happens.
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  #10  
Old 08-25-2009, 12:45 PM
helpplease
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Will pay shipping for honey
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  #11  
Old 08-25-2009, 01:11 PM
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I've got a buddy of mine who used to keep bees. A LOT of bees. He had hives spread out all over the San Pedro River valley. Probably 150 or so. They all died out due to some infectious mite or something. He now contracts with the Southern Pacific Railroad to kill hives under their bridges and tunnels. I asked him how he felt about killing the creatures which he once nourished and tended and he said, "Well Hell, I was doing a pretty fair job of killing them while I was trying to keep them alive so I figured I'd get paid for it!"
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Old 08-26-2009, 01:29 PM
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I recently discovered a nest of honey bees - possibly yellow jackets - living in a hole they dug in the front lawn. Isn't this a bit strange for any type of bee to live in the ground?
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Old 08-26-2009, 02:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 280EZRider View Post
I recently discovered a nest of honey bees - possibly yellow jackets - living in a hole they dug in the front lawn. Isn't this a bit strange for any type of bee to live in the ground?
We get underground yellow jacket nests up our way pretty often.
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  #14  
Old 08-26-2009, 02:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 280EZRider View Post
I recently discovered a nest of honey bees - possibly yellow jackets - living in a hole they dug in the front lawn. Isn't this a bit strange for any type of bee to live in the ground?
Yeah, yellow jackets. About a half gallon of gasoline in the hole after dark will take care of them... Wait, did I say that out loud?

Not that I advocate such environmentally unfriendly practices.
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Old 08-26-2009, 02:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by helpplease View Post
I am not sure how many people understand how important bees are to the agricultural industry other than just making sooo delicous honey.
Very important for the production of Hops
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