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  #1  
Old 09-08-2009, 12:38 PM
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Threadlock vs anti-seize...

Fellas - sorry, didn't know where to post this:

I admit I'm a little confused on when to use one product vs the other... I've been using the anti-seize on most of the bolts especially on those that I had very hard time getting off the vehicle. Is there a general rule on when to use one vs the other? Like in hot places do you use antiseize and then the blue threadlock in the other places?!

It's confusing to me because we want the bolts to stay in pace until next time it's time to remove them...

James
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  #2  
Old 09-08-2009, 01:27 PM
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Threadlock is to keep the bolts in place. Anti seize is to aid in them coming off. I use anti-seize on my lugs because if I ever have to take the car into a shop, I know they are going to overtighten with an impact.
I've only used threadlocker on the car once, when I made my own shift knob. If you are able to torque the bolts down properly, I don't see much need for threadlocker.
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  #3  
Old 09-08-2009, 01:29 PM
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plus threadlock is expensive. A trick I learned from a friend that builds props, mechanical sculptures, etc is that a small bottle of any nail polish will do the trick.
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  #4  
Old 09-08-2009, 02:02 PM
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Originally Posted by TheDon View Post
plus threadlock is expensive. A trick I learned from a friend that builds props, mechanical sculptures, etc is that a small bottle of any nail polish will do the trick.
What color?
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  #5  
Old 09-08-2009, 02:07 PM
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Antisieze for aluminum/steel contact for sure.
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  #6  
Old 09-08-2009, 03:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tankdriver View Post
Threadlock is to keep the bolts in place. Anti seize is to aid in them coming off. I use anti-seize on my lugs because if I ever have to take the car into a shop, I know they are going to overtighten with an impact.
Anti-seize on lugnuts prevents a proper torque from being reached. THe torque specs are for CLEAN AND DRY lugnuts and studs. The anti-seize will allow the lutnut to turn past its intended torqueing spec, even when using a properly calibrated torque wrench...

and FWIW, there are not many shops around that still use Straight Impacts on lutnuts. They use a device called a torque limiting stick http://www.torquestick.com/

Antiseize on bimetal contacts, locktight on vibration prone bolts...

~Nate
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  #7  
Old 09-08-2009, 03:55 PM
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Antiseize on spark plug threads and on the bolt that attaches the lawnmower blade to the shaft.
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  #8  
Old 09-08-2009, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Nate View Post
Anti-seize on lugnuts prevents a proper torque from being reached. THe torque specs are for CLEAN AND DRY lugnuts and studs. The anti-seize will allow the lutnut to turn past its intended torqueing spec, even when using a properly calibrated torque wrench...
I've heard that, but I've never seen any proof that anti seize has any significant impact on torque. Even if true, I'd rather have a couple more lb/ft of torque on the wheels than have a stud break on me.

Quote:
and FWIW, there are not many shops around that still use Straight Impacts on lutnuts. They use a device called a torque limiting stick http://www.torquestick.com/
Hadn't heard about that. It may exist, but there's no guarantee a shop has it. I'll be asking in the future, thanks.
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Old 09-08-2009, 04:42 PM
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Good rule...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nate View Post
Antiseize on bimetal contacts, locktight on vibration prone bolts...
Seems like a good, simple rule. Thx
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  #10  
Old 09-08-2009, 05:08 PM
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I use locktight on every bolt that MB used it on; usually is found on suspension fittings.

Same applies for anti-sieze (ie: none).
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  #11  
Old 09-08-2009, 05:26 PM
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I'll agree with nothing on the lug bolts. Most places do use a torque stick, a red one. If not, use a different shop, or bring you torque and have the person hand tighten, I've done that.
After searching a bit, there is a major discussion on the subject, to each their own.
Yet, anti-seize on bolts with dissimilar metals is a good idea.
Use thread lock on brake caliper bolts and shock bolts.
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  #12  
Old 09-08-2009, 08:52 PM
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The FSM for my 210 explicitly says to never put any lubricant on the ball of the lug bolt or ball seat of the rim, but does not mention the threads at all. I have always lubricated lug bolts and have never broken or lost a bolt or nut as a result.

I disagree that you should feel comfortable with someone tightening your wheels with an impact wrench and torque stick. Those things are better than nothing, but really not all that good.

I use thread lock on about everything that doesn't get oil, grease or anti-seize compound. Thread lock will also keep water out to help prevent corrosion. You have to break the thread lock, but you have a much reduced chance of galling upon removal.

One exception: I never use thread locking compound where there is a plastic part involved. I have seen too many plastic parts turn to dust after a week or two after doing that. I don't know what plastics may be affected, so I just don't use the stuff.
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  #13  
Old 09-08-2009, 09:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nate View Post
Anti-seize on lugnuts prevents a proper torque from being reached. THe torque specs are for CLEAN AND DRY lugnuts and studs. The anti-seize will allow the lutnut to turn past its intended torqueing spec, even when using a properly calibrated torque wrench...

and FWIW, there are not many shops around that still use Straight Impacts on lutnuts. They use a device called a torque limiting stick http://www.torquestick.com/

Antiseize on bimetal contacts, locktight on vibration prone bolts...

~Nate
No one really cares what the torque is on any fastener. What matters is the bolt stretch. Its difficult to measure the stretch, so we measure torque, and make assumptions on how much stretch a given torque will provide.
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  #14  
Old 09-08-2009, 11:10 PM
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When I work on cars from a particularly notorious shop whos managers REQUIRE the use of antiseize on all lutnuts, studs, and backsides of rims, I cannot get an accurate torque.

I can torque stick it down to around the torque spec, and then get almost two more turns out of a lutnut before a good calibrated torque wrench "clicks off" (usually stretching the stud in the process)
I broke one stud before. I replaced it out of my own pocket to avoid issues with the owner (known nit-picker)

If it has antiseize on it, I dont touch it until I inform the owner about whats going on (and going to happen unless I clean it all off, and make them wait another half hour)

I wish people would just realize that torque specs are for CLEAN DRY BOLTS IN GOOD CONDITION(unless otherwise noted)


Torque sticks shoud be hanging around wherever the impact guns are. A red one is a 17mm 60ft lb one if I'm not mistaken, then it's torqued to whatever the book calls for (Ours are hanging on the lifts)
~Nate
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  #15  
Old 09-08-2009, 11:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nate View Post
When I work on cars from a particularly notorious shop whos managers REQUIRE the use of antiseize on all lutnuts, studs, and backsides of rims, I cannot get an accurate torque.

I can torque stick it down to around the torque spec, and then get almost two more turns out of a lutnut before a good calibrated torque wrench "clicks off" (usually stretching the stud in the process)
I broke one stud before. I replaced it out of my own pocket to avoid issues with the owner (known nit-picker)

If it has antiseize on it, I dont touch it until I inform the owner about whats going on (and going to happen unless I clean it all off, and make them wait another half hour)

I wish people would just realize that torque specs are for CLEAN DRY BOLTS IN GOOD CONDITION(unless otherwise noted)


Torque sticks shoud be hanging around wherever the impact guns are. A red one is a 17mm 60ft lb one if I'm not mistaken, then it's torqued to whatever the book calls for (Ours are hanging on the lifts)
~Nate

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