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  #1  
Old 09-04-2010, 11:40 AM
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Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 178
Anyone use a Scanguage II?

THinking about getting one for one of my cars with an OBD port. It looks like the set price is $159, and also the lowest I've seen new.

Is this gadget worth the money, and how accurate is it? I'm interested in getting temperature readings, among other info the SG gives.

Is this a plug and play device? Or is there some setup and prgramming involved? It would be nice to switch to other cars or if a friend needs some codes read.

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  #2  
Old 09-04-2010, 12:30 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2005
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I don't have one. I've only read about them here and at BW. I have yet to see any negative reports on this device. I don't have one because I don't think it integrates well into the interior of the car, but that's a personal decision.

I'm sure that you'll get some customers to this thread. I'm actually now again somewhat interested in getting one, since my el-cheapo OBD-II scanner just died.
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  #3  
Old 09-04-2010, 12:38 PM
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Location: Mooresville, NC
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Depends on what vehicle you want to use it in. Check out the vehicle application list on their website - unless they give your vehicle an unqualified thumbs up that ALL of the SGII functions will work - ie, no "functions X, Y, and Z may not work on this vehicle" - my suggestion would be that you avoid using it, as it may cause unforseen problems with the vehicle.

I've tried using one in my '05 Jeep Liberty CRD diesel. DC fudged on the design and used a shared data bus for the ECM and TCM - the two modules would alternate as to which one was "active" and which one was "asleep". The SGII would always freeze up after a period of time, anywhere from 30 seconds to 45 minutes, after starting the vehicle - pretty damned annoying on a long trip - and the only way to unfreeze it was to unplug it from the OBD port for 5 to 10 minutes, then try plugging it back in. This was due to the ECM deciding to go to "sleep" as far as different data functions were concerned.

On top of that, the SGII itself put out enough "noise" onto the data bus that it caused the TCM several times to lose it's data signal, then shut down and reboot - causing the electronically controlled 545 RFE tranny to completely shut down and drop into neutral - when you're going down the interstate at 75 mph, then suddenly there's a loud bang, the TC drops out of lockup, the tranny drops completely out of gear and the engine drops to idle, then slowly reengages itself as if you're doing a normal acceleration from a dead stop, within a period of 5 to 10 seconds - let's just say I had to clean off the drivers seat.

This didn't cause any CEL's - I had to take it to my tranny shop and when he hooked up his high-end scanner, he found several "hidden" stored codes that showed the TCM had lost power/signal and rebooted itself. The above scenario happened around 6 times, under varying speeds and conditions, until we tumbled to the fact that it was the SGII causing it, and I quit using it - after that, no more problems with the tranny.

But the few times this did happen, it caused enough damage to the TC clutch that I had to end up replacing the TC a few months later - I was pissed because it was a Suncoast billet TC mad specifically for the Liberty CRD and cost me $700, but it was still under warranty and Ron Wolverton at Suncoast was good to his word and sent me a replacement at no charge.

As far as using the SGII and programming it - very easy, some basic initial setup when you first hook it up to the vehicle - ie, what type engine, etc, 5 to 10 minutes tops, and the instructions do a good job of walking you thru it. Also does a good job of reading CEL codes to tell you what caused a CEL, and allowing you to reset the CEL. Very easy to swap around and change readings on the screen even while driving. If it gives you the data readings you want, and it works on your vehicle, it's a very good and inexpensive alternative to going to the expense and work of installing a set of conventional gauges in your vehicle.

In summary, I'd make bloody sure that your vehicle is given an unqualified thumbs up on their application list - no caveats that certain functions won't work. If that's the case, I'd say it's worth a try - I'd still be using mine if it wasn't for the problems encountered with my particular vehicle.

Just a word of caution - if you ever encounter any of the problems mentioned above, ie data readings freezing up or odd behavior from the tranny, I'd remove it from the vehicle post haste.
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'87 300D 212K miles
'87 300D 151K miles - R.I.P. 12/08
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  #4  
Old 09-04-2010, 02:08 PM
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I have one on my car and really like it. But I hope the previous poster reported those problems to the mfg as they will list those issues or fix them I would think. I seem to recall that you could set the rate at which it sends requests, to prevent this sort of thing.

I use the trip feature a lot more than I thought I would. I programmed some custom readouts (what they call "gauges") that let me watch the fuel trims. This helped me diagnose my bad MAF. I also programmed to watch the O2 sensors. I found a nice spot to put it on top of the steering column. But is does block the odometer and the high beam light and the bulb out indicator, so I have to take a peek behind it once in a while. My friend bought one for his Ford and he likes it (Mercury Sable I think).

As far as using it out of the box, all you do is plug it in. The only programming is setting the gas tank size and calibrating the distance if you want to.
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  #5  
Old 09-06-2010, 08:02 PM
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Anyone want to sell theirs?

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