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  #1  
Old 02-05-2013, 11:19 PM
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Interesting hose clamp tool.

Has anyone used this tool, wonder if it would work for vacuum lines and turbo hoses?

Clamptite Tool

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  #2  
Old 02-05-2013, 11:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jorn View Post
Has anyone used this tool, wonder if it would work for vacuum lines and turbo hoses?

Clamptite Tool

Vacuum hoses usually won't need much in the way of clamping and turbo hoses situated such that they are would be pretty difficult to get the tool around in order to install the clamping wire in place, no?
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  #3  
Old 02-05-2013, 11:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jorn View Post
Has anyone used this tool, wonder if it would work for vacuum lines and turbo hoses?

Clamptite Tool

Done it on air tool lines in commercial aviation w/o the tool.
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  #4  
Old 02-06-2013, 12:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Woody Worker View Post
Vacuum hoses usually won't need much in the way of clamping and turbo hoses situated such that they are would be pretty difficult to get the tool around in order to install the clamping wire in place, no?
Plenty of space in my Volvo 780 to use it, was wondering if it would hold under boost. Under high boost it's good to clamp your vacuum hoses well. I'm using small zip ties now, using this tool would make it look nice and a lot cleaner.
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  #5  
Old 02-06-2013, 12:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jorn View Post
Plenty of space in my Volvo 780 to use it, was wondering if it would hold under boost. Under high boost it's good to clamp your vacuum hoses well. I'm using small zip ties now, using this tool would make it look nice and a lot cleaner.
Hey I'm just a simple guy, I must have missed the clue that you where asking about its application on your Volvo on here on this Mercedes forum! But if it works for you it should make you happy I suppose. Having worked around engines of various sorts for the last 30 years I'm still a bit perplexed as to why or how it would be "good" to clamp a vacuum line because the engine is under high boost from a turbocharger. Generally speaking the more power generated by an engine will result in more vacuum being generated, and more vacuum being generated generally results in a pressure differential that causes the vacuum system to tighten up so to speak and therefore have less of a chance of a hose coming loose somehow. But maybe things work different out there on the left coast.

As far as holding under boost I suspect that it would depend predominately on the strength of the wire used but it's obvious that judging the amount of tension imparted on to the wire by that tool is pretty subjective and probably pretty difficult to do with any degree of consistency. But if form is more important than function it may be just what you want.

Maybe it might be worth considering why those stupid engineers at Volvo couldn't see the beauty of this method of clamping?
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  #6  
Old 02-06-2013, 01:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Woody Worker View Post
Hey I'm just a simple guy, I must have missed the clue that you where asking about its application on your Volvo on here on this Mercedes forum! But if it works for you it should make you happy I suppose. Having worked around engines of various sorts for the last 30 years I'm still a bit perplexed as to why or how it would be "good" to clamp a vacuum line because the engine is under high boost from a turbocharger. Generally speaking the more power generated by an engine will result in more vacuum being generated, and more vacuum being generated generally results in a pressure differential that causes the vacuum system to tighten up so to speak and therefore have less of a chance of a hose coming loose somehow. But maybe things work different out there on the left coast.

As far as holding under boost I suspect that it would depend predominately on the strength of the wire used but it's obvious that judging the amount of tension imparted on to the wire by that tool is pretty subjective and probably pretty difficult to do with any degree of consistency. But if form is more important than function it may be just what you want.

Maybe it might be worth considering why those stupid engineers at Volvo couldn't see the beauty of this method of clamping?
A hose is a hose, what difference is it if it's in a Volvo, Mercedes or any other car. I was asking if anyone had experience with this tool, apparently you don't, so why reply?
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  #7  
Old 02-06-2013, 01:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Jorn View Post
A hose is a hose, what difference is it if it's in a Volvo, Mercedes or any other car. I was asking if anyone had experience with this tool, apparently you don't, so why reply?
I do have experience with this type of clamping but with a much better professional tool, this type of tool requires a certain ability to swing the tool and therebye create the securing hook in the wires that go through the bale created by the original loop in the wire. When you originally asked I assumed based on your lack of any information to the contrary that your question was in regard to hoses attached to turbo chargers in Mercedes vehicles which for the most part do not use hoses which operate under boost pressure except the small short hose between the turbo housing and the wastegate. This tool and this type of clamping could not be used on a virtually any Mercedes turbo boost hose installation because there is no room to swing the tool the minimum 90 degrees require to effect the hook.

It matters very much where the end of the hose is located with respect to the other engine parts that could interfere with or prevent the tool from effectively functioning.

In addition professional tools used to effect this type of clamp can be had with integrated adjustable tensioning so as to optimize the clamping capacity of the wire clamp. But none of that matters if someone is just jerking off rather than making a serious effort to accomplish something. You're welcome Onan.
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  #8  
Old 02-06-2013, 06:34 AM
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I have a small one. Had it for 20 years. good little tool. Have used it instead of hose clamps. The hardest thing is getting hold of soft stainless wire. You can squeeze a 3" black plastic pipe down onto a 2" copper pipe. I have used it to clamp a power steering hose on a pipe.
Recently made a large one that can handle fence wire. It works well. have used it to tie up 8x4 beams.
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  #9  
Old 02-06-2013, 08:17 AM
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I have no experience with the tool, but my gut is telling me that if you use it, you will NEED experience with it. You will need to know how tight you can get it on different types of hoses.

What they fail to point out in the video is that those hose clamps they show, spread the clamping force over much more AREA, distributing the load. On soft hose material, it appears to me that a rookie could easily cut the hose in half with that thing.

Don't get me wrong, I like it, but I am just saying that you need to pay attention to how tight you cinch down that wire.

Another thing about hose clamps is that they are quick to install, quick to remove and quick to reuse.
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  #10  
Old 02-06-2013, 08:48 AM
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I can see many people having to have radiators replaced because they put side pressure or clamped down too hard on plastic hose barbs...

In the past, I've used tools like this that I fashioned to do the same job on high pressure pneumatic lines, but crimped clamps work much better.
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  #11  
Old 02-06-2013, 10:14 AM
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1. How much does the tool and the stainless steel wire cost? I bet you could buy a lot of hose clamps for that money.

B. His method of tensioning was, uhh, interesting.

III. If I had one of these chingaderas, I sure wouldn't be using such small gauge wire on rubber hoses. Danger of cutting into the rubber like a cheese cutter. Maybe bigger gauge wire like a Ford hose clamp, but that would be expensive and hard to work with.
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  #12  
Old 02-06-2013, 10:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woody Worker View Post
engines of various sorts for the last 30 years I'm still a bit perplexed as to why or how it would be "good" to clamp a vacuum line because the engine is under high boost from a turbocharger. Generally speaking the more power generated by an engine will result in more vacuum being generated, and more vacuum being generated generally results in a pressure differential that causes the vacuum system to tighten up so to speak and therefore have less of a chance of a hose coming loose somehow. But maybe things work different out there on the left coast.
When you are under boost from a turbocharger or supercharger, the engine does not produce vacuum. Just the opposite. Air is being forced into the intake and will pop vacuum hoses off unless they are properly secured. The pressure will force vacuum hoses off the engine because, once again, the engine is not pulling any air since it is being forced into the engine. When you let off the throttle and the bypass valve opens, the engine will start to pull vacuum.
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  #13  
Old 02-06-2013, 10:55 AM
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Originally Posted by jplinville View Post
I can see many people having to have radiators replaced because they put side pressure or clamped down too hard on plastic hose barbs...

In the past, I've used tools like this that I fashioned to do the same job on high pressure pneumatic lines, but crimped clamps work much better.
That's what I'm afraid of when using this tool or that you cut through the hose.
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  #14  
Old 02-06-2013, 01:45 PM
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I have that tool, I bought if from the inventor at a trade show. I have also used it to clamp down my boost hoses. For such an application it worked very well. The real nifty thing about the tool is that you can control how many wraps of wire go into each clamp. In softer hoses you can wrap it more, and vice versa. I find it does take a little fiddling to make a pretty clamp with it, but it can be done. I have found its best to lube the hose with silicone or the like when doing multiple wrap clamps with it. YOu can lose clamping due to the friction of the rubber hose, and lube helps alleviate that. All in all a great tool to have in the "emergency kit" as as long as you have wire, one size fits all.
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Old 02-06-2013, 02:23 PM
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Originally Posted by duxthe1 View Post
I have that tool, I bought if from the inventor at a trade show. I have also used it to clamp down my boost hoses. For such an application it worked very well. The real nifty thing about the tool is that you can control how many wraps of wire go into each clamp. In softer hoses you can wrap it more, and vice versa. I find it does take a little fiddling to make a pretty clamp with it, but it can be done. I have found its best to lube the hose with silicone or the like when doing multiple wrap clamps with it. YOu can lose clamping due to the friction of the rubber hose, and lube helps alleviate that. All in all a great tool to have in the "emergency kit" as as long as you have wire, one size fits all.
That's what I wanted to know, thanks!

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