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  #1  
Old 03-20-2013, 10:07 AM
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Cheap wood for a garden gate - can I paint over treated wood?

G'day Folks,

Google has failed me so far (but I'm still searching).

I need to build a garden gate really cheaply to improve the first impressions of the house so I can sell it with greater ease - well that's the plan - I'm doing a house doctor on the place and I need to cheer up the front.

Impregnated soft wood seems to be the cheapest and chunkiest stuff I can buy locally. It is the sort of stuff that has a yucky dirty slightly green hue to it. To improve the looks of this material I'd have to paint it with a white stain (it would then match in with the veranda I built last summer).

I'm a bit concerned that the yucky green pressure goo will come out like a rash on the finished product.

Has anyone got any experience with painting this cheapo junk wood?

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  #2  
Old 03-20-2013, 10:13 AM
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Treated lumber

Yes you can paint treated lumber but .....

People tend to overuse it. Any structure that does not contact the ground can be made of untreated lumber so long as it is finished with paint or stain. Untreated lumber should be significantly less expensive than treated lumber.
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  #3  
Old 03-20-2013, 10:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stretch View Post
G'day Folks,

Google has failed me so far (but I'm still searching).

I need to build a garden gate really cheaply to improve the first impressions of the house so I can sell it with greater ease - well that's the plan - I'm doing a house doctor on the place and I need to cheer up the front.

Impregnated soft wood seems to be the cheapest and chunkiest stuff I can buy locally. It is the sort of stuff that has a yucky dirty slightly green hue to it. To improve the looks of this material I'd have to paint it with a white stain (it would then match in with the veranda I built last summer).

I'm a bit concerned that the yucky green pressure goo will come out like a rash on the finished product.

Has anyone got any experience with painting this cheapo junk wood?
I just recently did this with a porch I modified, that was having pretty continuous rot problems.
I restructured the deck from a screen in porch to a railed porch, and built all the railings with treated lumber.

The biggest thing you need to do is wait at least a few weeks for the treated lumber to weather a bit, then go in and paint. When its fresh and green, it could cause paint issues, but if you wait a few weeks (I waited about 3), it turns brown and it no longer feels damp to the touch, at which point it really holds the paint well.

I painted the whole porch last year and its been fine since, no issues at all yet.
The paint makes it look really good, a huge difference in the treated lumber appearance
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  #4  
Old 03-20-2013, 10:25 AM
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In the past, I've used skid wood. Take apart old skids, dog ear the end of each plank, and they work great. They take oil based paint rather well, and are free. The skids I used were made with oak planks. I made a fence this way in mom's garden at her old place...and it's still there today, 20 years later.

Not bad for free stuff...
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  #5  
Old 03-20-2013, 10:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rocky raccoon View Post
Yes you can paint treated lumber but .....

People tend to overuse it. Any structure that does not contact the ground can be made of untreated lumber so long as it is finished with paint or stain. Untreated lumber should be significantly less expensive than treated lumber.
What he said.

Pressure treated wood is very unstable when it is fresh. Too much moisture in it to paint. Most people stain it rather than paint it.
Regular old untreated wood would be a better choice for this gate. Already dried and ready for paint.
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  #6  
Old 03-20-2013, 12:15 PM
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Thanks for all the quick replies.

I'm not sure if I've got three weeks to wait - and knowing Holland like I know Holland I guess it would take longer for the treated wood to dry. I'm a bit hessitant to use indoor wood because it is really of a poor quality here. It is the sort of stuff that is virtually impossible to carve / chissel out - it just splits. You have to resort to very careful use router to make joints with this junk...

@jplinville - please excuse my ignorance but I is from another land - what are skids? Something like scaffolding planks?
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1961 Volvo PV544 Bare metal rat rod-ish thing

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  #7  
Old 03-20-2013, 12:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stretch View Post

@jplinville - please excuse my ignorance but I is from another land - what are skids? Something like scaffolding planks?
They are also known as shipping pallets. They are roughly 4 foot by 4 foot, and have about 6-8 planks each. Most companies toss them out when they start to break. You can get them free, usually.

Since I've always worked with steel, and oak is the cheapest, strong hardwood that is used for skids, I've always been able to get them for nothing. They are generally constructed with long staples.

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  #8  
Old 03-20-2013, 12:35 PM
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I strongly suggest using primer before you paint it. Without primer, the paint will just get absorbed by the wood and it will look yucky.
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  #9  
Old 03-20-2013, 12:36 PM
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When I moved into my 1876 built house 10 years ago the paint on the fence, barn and the trim on the house was peeling off.
After removing most of it by scarping and pressure washing I repainted using an oil based solid stain. It soaks in and won't peel, just fades after a few years and is just redone.








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  #10  
Old 03-21-2013, 02:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jplinville View Post
They are also known as shipping pallets. They are roughly 4 foot by 4 foot, and have about 6-8 planks each. Most companies toss them out when they start to break. You can get them free, usually.

Since I've always worked with steel, and oak is the cheapest, strong hardwood that is used for skids, I've always been able to get them for nothing. They are generally constructed with long staples.

Ah now I see where the name comes from - thanks!

I'm amazed you guys get oak pallets - what luxury.
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1965 Land Rover Series 2a Station Wagon CIS recovery therapy!
1961 Volvo PV544 Bare metal rat rod-ish thing

I'm here to chat about cars and to help others - I'm not here "to always be right" like an internet warrior



Don't leave that there - I'll take it to bits!
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  #11  
Old 03-21-2013, 02:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xlimodriver View Post
When I moved into my 1876 built house 10 years ago the paint on the fence, barn and the trim on the house was peeling off.
After removing most of it by scarping and pressure washing I repainted using an oil based solid stain. It soaks in and won't peel, just fades after a few years and is just redone.
...
Wow that's an amazing house with great curb appeal - it must have been built by a seriously rich guy back then. A brick built house must have been a luxury back then. (Most North American houses of this type and age seem to me to have been wood construction)
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1992 W201 190E 1.8 171,000 km - Daily driver
1981 W123 300D ~ 100,000 miles / 160,000 km - project car stripped to the bone
1965 Land Rover Series 2a Station Wagon CIS recovery therapy!
1961 Volvo PV544 Bare metal rat rod-ish thing

I'm here to chat about cars and to help others - I'm not here "to always be right" like an internet warrior



Don't leave that there - I'll take it to bits!
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  #12  
Old 03-21-2013, 03:04 AM
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There's a new sort of treated wood out that's dark brown rather than the yucky green. Seems to be way drier in general as well. The green stuff is often quite wet, as mentioned. Not sure why this would be noticeably different. I'm guessing the process is different. Still has that pockmarked business but is more attractive.

I've seen a lot of painted wood rot outdoors, unless it's redwood. Has to be painted regularly or it goes fairly quickly.

I'll second everything about letting the treated dry and then use a primer.
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  #13  
Old 03-21-2013, 03:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stretch View Post
Ah now I see where the name comes from - thanks!

I'm amazed you guys get oak pallets - what luxury.
It's the primary wood used in pallet making.

Pallets made out of oak?? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

The link above shows that many good woods are used to make them. I was looking at one site that showed many projects made from the slats...pretty cool stuff.
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  #14  
Old 03-21-2013, 05:50 AM
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Most of the pallet wood around here, though Oak is very rough and unusable for anything more than pallets.

A better choice than pressure treated where you want to paint is a naturally non rotting wood such as redwood, cedar or cypress, if you can afford it. A single gate might fit in that category. Be sure to use galvanized or stainless steel fasteners.
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  #15  
Old 03-21-2013, 05:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stretch View Post
Wow that's an amazing house with great curb appeal - it must have been built by a seriously rich guy back then. A brick built house must have been a luxury back then. (Most North American houses of this type and age seem to me to have been wood construction)
I get a kick sometimes when people say "they don't build them like they used to" and point out the houses which survive from the mid 1800s. The very best tend to survive, though tucked into obscure locations around Lafayette are some structures from the early 1800s.

The ordinary workers cottage is so small that it would hardly qualify as a kitchen in the mcmansions being constructed today. Survivors of this age tend to have additions that are multiples of size of the original structure.

In Madison Indiana, a community on the Ohio river with a large number of surviving homes from the early 1800s has at least a hundred homes built on lots that probably are 18 to 20' wide. The original homes are barely 8 x 30' running back from the street. Most have larger additions on the back which triple the size or more. Very interesting stuff though. When these were built, many probably had a cow and some chickens in a shed in the back when new.

The high budget homes tend to be the survivors since the owners could afford to keep them up....kindof like MBs.

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