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  #1  
Old 01-30-2015, 09:31 PM
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Hardwood floor repair

There is one place where there is some movement in the hardwood flooring. I suspect there was a small gap between the subfloor and the hardwood. I have a a needle and syringe. The needle OD is smaller than .1 inch diameter. Is there a suitable glue that I could inject where the floor moves? What would you suggest?

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Old 01-30-2015, 09:59 PM
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Any thin wood glue should work I think. But, is it possible to put a screw up thru the subfloor and into the hardwood?
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Old 01-31-2015, 07:30 AM
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Most of the old timers

used thin wooden wedges driven between the joist and the subfloor. Used to be able to buy them by the bag at hardware stores. Maybe still.
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Old 01-31-2015, 08:56 AM
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Screws vertically into the area. Even if it requires some ceiling repair. Nine times out of ten there is a moisture barrier that will prevent you gluing the hardwood to the subfloor anyways.

I have never tried it and would have to think about it for awhile. Lubrication of the squeeking areas grooves. Incidentally I use four mil plastic as the moisture barrier.

Last edited by barry12345; 01-31-2015 at 09:11 AM.
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  #5  
Old 01-31-2015, 10:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MS Fowler View Post
There is one place where there is some movement in the hardwood flooring. I suspect there was a small gap between the subfloor and the hardwood. I have a a needle and syringe. The needle OD is smaller than .1 inch diameter. Is there a suitable glue that I could inject where the floor moves? What would you suggest?
I say it depends on the system that has been used.

If the hardwood floor has been layed on top of a sub-floor much like laminate flooring is done these days then you have a more complicated problem - the whole floor is meant to float about to a certain extent rather unlike the more traditional method of gluing the hardwood in place with substances such as bitumen.

If you have a traditional glued down floor then I'd use glue

If you have a more modern (easy to pull back up) solution I would consider removing the flooring and relaying it. If this is out of the question for another reason I'd consider squirting expanding foam through to the underside - this could go wrong and be horrifically messy though!
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  #6  
Old 01-31-2015, 10:43 AM
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If it's 3/4" hardwood, in the US, it would typically have been nailed to the subfloor. You could also drill the hardwood, put a screw down from the top, countersinking the head and fill the hole with a matching wood putty. From below would be better though.
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Old 01-31-2015, 11:40 AM
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I would make sure there is plenty of weight on the floor before screwing, save the screw from doing the work and tearing up the wood.

Last edited by INSIDIOUS; 01-31-2015 at 07:06 PM.
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Old 01-31-2015, 03:21 PM
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Some more information--
It is 3/4 inch Brazillian Cherry.
It was nailed with a pneumatic hammer.
This area probably has a plastic/felt underlayment over the original OSB subfloor--memory fails somewhat.
The area below is finished drywall, and a header double 2X8. I'd have to get a long bit and be precise in measurements to avoid a major screw-up.

I appreciate the various suggestions.
Still less than 4 weeks post-op, and the lack of activity is making me even crazier than previously. Add to that, my lack of endurance, and this is a frustrating time.
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Old 01-31-2015, 06:26 PM
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Originally Posted by MS Fowler View Post
Some more information--
It is 3/4 inch Brazillian Cherry.
It was nailed with a pneumatic hammer.
This area probably has a plastic/felt underlayment over the original OSB subfloor--memory fails somewhat.
The area below is finished drywall, and a header double 2X8. I'd have to get a long bit and be precise in measurements to avoid a major screw-up.

I appreciate the various suggestions.
Still less than 4 weeks post-op, and the lack of activity is making me even crazier than previously. Add to that, my lack of endurance, and this is a frustrating time.
Could you use a stud finder to make sure you drill into the 2x8, or am I picturing the situation wrong?

Sorry to hear about the frustration. That's no good.
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Old 02-01-2015, 03:37 PM
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Originally Posted by kerry View Post
If it's 3/4" hardwood, in the US, it would typically have been nailed to the subfloor. You could also drill the hardwood, put a screw down from the top, countersinking the head and fill the hole with a matching wood putty. From below would be better though.
Get a plug cutter and drill out a plug in a not noticeable area of a closet for example. Thats if you decide to screw from the top. Much better finish match.
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  #11  
Old 02-02-2015, 02:21 AM
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There is a remarkable product I used to stop floor squeaking. It leaves a 1/8th or slightly smaller hole however. It's a screw that has steeper pitch threads on the bottom 1.5 inch or so, I think 7 per inch, and 8 per inch above with an inch or so of clear shank up to the head. You drill a pilot hole and drive it in through a shoulder device that will stop the head at the correct height and make the upper part snap off at a scored spot about 1/4" below the floor. The steeper pitch thread travels faster and will pull down the flooring which has the lower pitch thread in the flooring at that point.

I'd recommend practicing with scrap first. I made a client very happy with these. Can also use them on carpeted floors with movement. You put scotch tape around the drill and screws so it doesn't grab the carpet on the way down.

Counter-Snap Floor Repair Kit - The Fix for Squeaky Hardwood or Vinyl Floors

Not sure if this is the brand I used, I got them at an ace hardware.

Ah, here's the brand I used. I may be prejudiced but I like the looks of this one better. Some good instructions on the link above however:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Squeeeeek-No-More-Stops-Floor-Squeaks-From-Above-the-Floor-3233/100662995
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Last edited by cmac2012; 02-02-2015 at 04:02 AM.
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  #12  
Old 02-02-2015, 03:56 AM
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Originally Posted by barry12345 View Post
Get a plug cutter and drill out a plug in a not noticeable area of a closet for example. Thats if you decide to screw from the top. Much better finish match.
You mean and just pop it in so you don't have to sand? Not a bad idea and I hate to be pessimistic but getting it the right height w/o sanding would be way tough. Or maybe you meant to sand, but then you'd have to refinish. With the method above, I used those waxy crayon looking filler sticks. If you get the one with 4 colors you can mix 2 or 3 to get the right shade. The stuff is fairly tough but with a big screwdriver or other spatula like think you can blend them. No sanding, close enough on the color.
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Old 02-02-2015, 08:28 PM
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Short cut the plug at less than the depth of the screw hole. I like challenges as they usually work out.

Various ways I can think of to come in at the same height so the finish of the plug and floor remain intact.

The twenty five year factory finishes contain aluminium oxide ground very fine. The same stuff as on decent brands of sandpaper. It is tough stuff.
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Old 02-03-2015, 04:26 AM
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I got a PM from a member about this and it made me realize I'd left an important tidbit out. You need to find the joists to screw these into. Needs sufficient grip on screw for the breakoff bit to work. My floor was facenailed, rows 8" apart, ever other one was on a joist. I found where those were with a studfinder in the room below and carefully measured over to the stairs and transferred that up to the main floor.

Here are some pics of the screw, I forgot I have a kit I haven't used yet. The black plastic thing is the shoulder you put the screw through, When it bottoms out the screw can't keep going down so it spins and breaks the score. In the second and third pic, the screw head is in the bottomed out position. Looks like the score, the snap off point, is just over an eighth below the surface of the floor - 5/32nds. You can barely see the pitch difference.

The sharp tip of the screw is 2 1/16th below the floor surface, the thread pitch changes 1" below floor surface.

The squeaks at the job I used these on were probably between the joists and subfloor but I can see from the mearurmenst that this would probably work on thin oak flooring, the 3/8 variety. But you'd probably need to use another jig that helps you see when you're at the right depth but then you need to use another enclosed jig to break the screw off below the surface.






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