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  #1  
Old 12-14-2018, 04:43 PM
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House gas heater issues.....

OK, the Carrier Gas Heater in my house appears to be an older generation model. It has worked well over the past ten years. That said, last check-up (over a year ago) the tech said the bearings are going out on the combustion exhaust system and the blower motor is leaking oil and may be unbalanced.

I have not called another company to come take a look so what he said might be true but then he may just be trying to sell me parts and service....the heater has been operating fine for the past year so I kinda doubt the first tech's analysis was accurate.

One day, about four months ago, I smelled a slight odor of natural gas in the garage. I opened the garage door and let it air out. Over the next four months the problem didn't occur again until last week, it happened again and only for one day.

Just to be on the safe side, I'm going to have the gas company come out and check things out.

Question; at this point is it worth it to throw parts at this carrier gas heater or would I be better off replacing it? I understand the newer gas heater models are much more efficient.......

your input and thoughts are appreciated....

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  #2  
Old 12-14-2018, 05:16 PM
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A gas leak isn't "operating fine." Bad bearings don't cause a gas leak. If it's an old unit, I'd consider replacement, without delay.
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  #3  
Old 12-14-2018, 05:59 PM
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Like yesterday.
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  #4  
Old 12-14-2018, 06:18 PM
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what do you mean by older,does it exhaust thru a pvc pipe or galvinized pipe out the roof?
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  #5  
Old 12-14-2018, 08:06 PM
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After the gas company guy comes out I'll report back. I've had them out in the past and they are without a doubt subject matter experts.
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Old 12-14-2018, 08:06 PM
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I believe it exhausts out galvenized pipe through the roof....
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Old 12-14-2018, 11:25 PM
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Exclamation Vintage Heaters

If there's any way you can afford to, replace it before it KILLS YOU ~ not kidding here .

My old house had a 1965 SEARS HVAC unit in it, the AC was long dead but I greased the blower bearings (most older units have greasable bearings you give one shot a year to), changed the filters , repaired a few collapsed ducts and was off to the races for several years .

In time (like 25 years) I began to feel 'funny' in the Winter when I ran the heat, I'd ask visitors '?do you smell anything?' ~ I didn't smell anything but the air inside my house wasn't fresh some how . no one _ever_ said the air wasn't fine to them .

Anyway, long story short I finally discovered a 1/4" hole in the heat exchanger, it was drafting CARBON MONOXIDE into the warm air stream and I could have died in my sleep ~ it turns out that carbon monoxide really has no smell, it displaces the oxygen in the air and you suffocate in your sleep .

I often see houses / apartments being torn down etc. that are less than 10 years old, if you're broke I'm sure you could salvage a decent furnace there & install it in your house, it's not rocket science, you just need to follow all the steps .

Good luck and DON'T RISK YOUR LIFE unless the Gas Man says it's a simple basic repair .
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Old 12-15-2018, 12:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vwnate1 View Post
Anyway, long story short I finally discovered a 1/4" hole in the heat exchanger, it was drafting CARBON MONOXIDE into the warm air stream and I could have died in my sleep ~ it turns out that carbon monoxide really has no smell, it displaces the oxygen in the air and you suffocate in your sleep .

And that's why you need to have CO detectors in your bedrooms.
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  #9  
Old 12-15-2018, 04:47 PM
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I have CO detectors in the house, one just outside the bedroom. With the furnace running, I've taken a CO detector and placed it over the air registers. It didn't trigger an alarm.

I also took the CO detector out into the garage when I smelled the gas the first time (about four months ago), still no alarm. So....it appears the problem is NOT CO, but some type of intermittent natural gas LEAK. Remember, natural gas is NOT CO.

I'm getting the gas company out here next week to give the furnace and natural gas supply the once over...
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  #10  
Old 12-15-2018, 04:50 PM
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I've read that sometimes natural gas leaks can be caused by the spark igniter or the regulator valve on the natural gas heater.
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  #11  
Old 12-15-2018, 09:44 PM
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Furnaces have a life expectancy. They are not W126 type critters.
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  #12  
Old 12-16-2018, 03:13 AM
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Exclamation Safety Knows No Season

Thanx Frank ~ I do have them now.... .

I try to remember to change the batteries every January .

My point was to illustrate that an old furnace should be closely inspected from time to time .

I'd have expected someone here to know this HVAC stuff, I certainly don't but have met many who tell me once you know it's it's neither difficult nor $pendy .
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1982 240D creampuff 370,000 miles
1978 300CD back from the dead&1980 300CD ~ SOLD
1984 300CD KEEPER ! 440,XXX miles
1984 Euro 300TD Fully optioned SWMBO's
1974 350SLC 4 speed stickshift SOLD & missed
Krazy Kommie Ural Motos (3)
BMW Moto R60/6 Barn Find, 8,000miles
1959 VW #113 Deuxe Beetle, 36hp engine, stock
Junk, Rust, Arthritis, Crushed Spine,Broken Neck&Back
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  #13  
Old 12-17-2018, 03:41 PM
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Found the leak!!

OK, the leak was the line going out to the gas powered security light pole on the front lawn. Since I'm not using the light, the gas company capped off the line and all is well with the exception of a small leak from the line going to the pilot light on the gas hot water heater.

Apparently, the brass nut that tightens on the right (stainless steel line) isn't quite tight enough. Is there anything like blue lock tite that I can put on the threads to help stop this miniscule leak? Or, should I simply try to tighten the brass nut? (see photo attached).

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House gas heater issues.....-hot-water-heater-016.jpg  
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  #14  
Old 12-17-2018, 05:52 PM
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Here’s your problem. There are formal standards for gas line connections. If you have a fire, and the inspector finds you’ve used blue locktite, what do you think your insurance company will do?

Find a licensed repair person, don’t be asking a bunch of strangers who can’t agree on oil change intervals.
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  #15  
Old 12-17-2018, 08:17 PM
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I used Ace Hardware Pipe Thread Compound TFE paste on the threads then tightened the brass fitting down.

Here's what the bottle says:

"SLOW SETTING: Brushable paste dries slowly non-hardening, withstands up to 3000 PSI (gases) at temperatures from -50 degrees to +400F and 10,000 PSI (liquids) from -50 degrees to +500F. Use on water, steam, natural &LP gas, oils, fuels and dilute acids. "

I'm going to spray soapy water on it in the morning to make sure it doesn't bubble up.
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