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  #1  
Old 03-20-2019, 08:43 PM
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First Across the Atlantic: Centennial (off topic)

The history of the first transatlantic air crossing is rarely told. Because there was so much competition for pride of first, we're often confused whether Lindbergh or Alcock/Brown made the first trip. Well, guess what? It wasn't either of those. The first transatlantic flight was made by a squadron of US Navy flying boats, remembered only in obscure naval publications. With the centennial approaching, I thought it might be appropriate to rescue this fascinating milestone from obscurity. Feel free to pass the link along if you know anyone interested:


http://tinyurl.com/y5phy57l
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  #2  
Old 03-20-2019, 11:05 PM
t walgamuth's Avatar
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The prize that Lindeburg won was for flying from NY to Paris non stop.

They did not know about the trade winds then so he arrived in Paris hours early and had enough fuel left to continue on to Rome had he wished. His is a great story of courage and intelligence.

Too bad he got a little to cozy with Hitler and the far right here in the states. Once the war started though he piped down about his admiration of Hitler.

His later life had a couple wierd turns. He had at least two families spread around complete with house wife and kids.
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Old 03-21-2019, 12:12 PM
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I forget the year but a group of Italian flying boats all made it to New York at one time. I remember the photographs of them and they too seemed early types.

Not inferring they were the earliest. I was surprised that they all made it though. I am not absolutely sure but I think that fact stuck in my mind.
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Old 03-21-2019, 03:15 PM
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Interesting story. Those flying boats were pretty wild.
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Old 03-21-2019, 03:19 PM
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Originally Posted by t walgamuth View Post
The prize that Lindeburg won was for flying from NY to Paris non stop.
Amend that to flying "solo".
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Old 03-22-2019, 07:41 AM
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There was an attempt by a Frenchman or duo. It is speculative, but they may have crossed the Atlantic, but not successfully. They did find a French made radial engine in VT or ME.
As for the crossing of the English channel, there was an article in the American Molders Association about a lost diary, as I remember.. It was an English Lord. He was the second son, so he could do what he wanted. He took up flying airplanes. In his diary, he flew across the channel to France. He was held under guard there. Then he escaped, but France didn't recognize that he was there. He's older brother tried to take off in the airplane and died. So, he became the Lord.
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Old 03-22-2019, 10:21 AM
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Thumbs up

Thanx for sharing this interesting history lesson .
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Old 03-22-2019, 05:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 75Sv1 View Post
There was an attempt by a Frenchman or duo. It is speculative, but they may have crossed the Atlantic, but not successfully. They did find a French made radial engine in VT or ME.
As for the crossing of the English channel, there was an article in the American Molders Association about a lost diary, as I remember.. It was an English Lord. He was the second son, so he could do what he wanted. He took up flying airplanes. In his diary, he flew across the channel to France. He was held under guard there. Then he escaped, but France didn't recognize that he was there. He's older brother tried to take off in the airplane and died. So, he became the Lord.


Never heard the one about the French engine found in Vermont or Maine. Both of them are large enough. That even if you got down unhurt you could easily perish.


I wonder how many tried and failed. Plus there would have had to be one. That used a French engine and was never heard of again.
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Old 03-23-2019, 02:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike D View Post
Amend that to flying "solo".
from Wikipedia.

Orteig Prize
Charles Lindbergh (left) and Raymond Orteig
The Orteig Prize was a reward offered to the first Allied aviator(s) to fly non-stop from New York City to Paris or vice versa.[1] Several famous aviators made unsuccessful attempts at the New York–Paris flight before the relatively unknown American Charles Lindbergh won the prize in 1927 in his aircraft Spirit of St. Louis. However a number of lives were lost by men who were competing to win the prize. Six men died in three separate crashes, and another three were injured in a fourth crash. The Prize occasioned considerable investment in aviation, sometimes many times the value of the prize itself, and advancing public interest and the level of aviation technology.

There was a french team that left just before Lindy and were lost.
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Last edited by t walgamuth; 03-23-2019 at 02:40 PM.
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Old 03-23-2019, 04:18 PM
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Originally Posted by t walgamuth View Post
from Wikipedia.


There was a french team that left just before Lindy and were lost.
I stand corrected.
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Old 03-28-2019, 09:15 PM
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The Lindberg child was abducted from home in New Jersey and killed. There was some speculation if the right person was executed for the deed. They had to find someone.

Just a flashback from reading about the couple many years ago. That was an extremely dangerous undertaking even for an experienced mail pilot.

I was looking in the cockpit of a 1950s jet fighter early this year. The amount of instrumentation was still pathetic. No real avionics yet. Just primitive basic instrumentation.
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  #12  
Old 03-28-2019, 10:26 PM
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Lindy was famous before the transatlantic flight for parachuting from four planes and surviving....the most of anybody at the time. Like Chuck Yeager and AJ Foyt he understood his machine and never gave up when in trouble.

He wrote several books about it. They are a great and easy read. He moved to CA from the midwest to supervise the construction of the Spirit of St Louis. He slept at the factory and they worked three shifts.
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..I also have a 427 Cobra replica with an aluminum chassis.
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  #13  
Old 03-29-2019, 07:20 AM
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Originally Posted by barry12345 View Post
Never heard the one about the French engine found in Vermont or Maine. Both of them are large enough. That even if you got down unhurt you could easily perish.


I wonder how many tried and failed. Plus there would have had to be one. That used a French engine and was never heard of again.
I think I came a crossed it on the PBS "History Detectives'.
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Old 05-08-2019, 06:56 PM
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Its too bad they have faded into history.

Lindy was tall and charismatic and incredibly skilled as a pilot. He perhaps also fitted in at a time people were hungry for a hero?
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