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  #1  
Old 05-31-2004, 07:30 PM
sfloriII's Avatar
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Mem. Day Roll Call: Post names of family members who gave their lives for our country

Please post the name, rank, and war/battle that your family member lost their life for our country so we may all salute them. Any of their stories are also appreciated.

I wish I had a family member's name to post, but I'm a first generation Italian and don't know of any on my mom's side (American).
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  #2  
Old 05-31-2004, 07:46 PM
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Re: Mem. Day Roll Call: Post names of family members who gave their lives for our country

Quote:
Originally posted by sfloriII
I wish I had a family member's name to post, but I'm a first generation Italian and don't know of any on my mom's side (American).
I am in the same boat there, although for different reasons. I had four family members that I know of who served in the Second World War, along with one known family member who served in the Civil War (actually was the Union flag-bearer at the Battle of Gettysburg). However, these family members had the fortune to survive the wars.

My hat is off to all who have served our country in any capacity, and especially those who paid the ultimate sacrifice.

*salutes*
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  #3  
Old 05-31-2004, 07:49 PM
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I think *wishing* is the wrong word.. you wouldn't want a family member to "die", right?

Anyways.. I had a distant family member in the US Army during WWII. He met mom's aunt in Germany.. married and came to the US.

Thats as far as US forces goes. I did have family members such as my grandfather and great grandfather fight during WWI and WWII.

EDIT:

I don't have war stories from my family that deals with US forces, but I do have some interesting ones.

My grandmother's oldest sister during the early part of WWII met a Nazi officer. They began dating and so forth and then decided to get married. However, being that she was Polish and Catholic, and he was a German Protestant... the Catholic church refused to marry them. They instead got married at a Protestant church. Shortly after the marriage, he recieves a notice that he is called to duty. He was told that he only has 2 more weeks of duty, essentially one battle, and then could be released to go back. This was the last time she has ever heard of him. He was presumed KIA and his body was never found. After the war, a US army soldier met her. Make long story short... after waiting years before the Nazi officer was officially declared deceased, the two got married and moved to the US.

Another story involves my great-grandfather. He too was Polish, although with a popular German 1st name. He worked for the Siemens company. Anyhow... towards the end of the War, the Germans were desparate and used even older men, past the age of 35 to fight. He then lived near the German/Polish border... but Germans were in control. My great grandfather's brothers were stopped by the Germans and told to serve. However, they argued and one ended up shot the other hung. My great-grandfather had no choice but to serve. He was then sent to a battle(don't know the name).. where there was heavy fighting. My Great grandfather, being in his early 40's at the time, decided to pretend he was killed. After the battle, lying amongst the dead... he crawled his way out of the mess and ran into the nearby forest. From there, he found a cottage with a stable. He had nothing to eat, so he took food that was there for the animals. However, he was caught by a German lady. He explained that he's a lost soldier looking for food. The lady, having her husband die in the war, was sympathetic and invited him for some food. He spent, from what I have been told 2 nights, before making his way back home. He stopped by several churches along the way in the care of the nuns. By the time he reached back home, the Allied forces where there. He quickly ran to them, presumably without his uniform by then, and explained his situation. He was taken in by the UNRA (can't find any info on them) where he worked among them. some things he brought back home with him were US ARMY pots and pans, that even to this day my grandmother in Poland uses to make her good Polish soups.

My grandfather, during WWII was too young to join the Army. He instead was a scout in an underground resistance called "Armja Krajowa" which meant "Country's Army". Don't have much info on what he did, but all I know is that he and his resistance fought the Germans near the Warsaw area.

Last edited by Snibble; 05-31-2004 at 09:15 PM.
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  #4  
Old 05-31-2004, 07:52 PM
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No, I wouldn't want a family member to die. I meant that I wish I could say that a family member had the honor of dying for their country. Everyone has to go some time- the later the better and with as much honor as possible.

I do have an uncle who served and died in WWII. He led a group of tanks in North Africa, fighting for Italy.
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1987 190-E 16 valve. 153,000 miles. Sold Feb. '06.
1980 300-D 225,000 miles. Donated to the National Kidney Foundation.
1980 240-D manual, 297,500 miles. Totaled by inattentive driver.
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  #5  
Old 05-31-2004, 08:09 PM
MedMech
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Re: Mem. Day Roll Call: Post names of family members who gave their lives for our cou

Quote:
Originally posted by sfloriII

I wish I had a family member's name to post, but I'm a first generation Italian and don't know of any on my mom's side (American).

It's nice for you to post this but don't wish any of them gave their lives.

Every male in my in my family has served in combat from my Great Great Granfathers on down. A few have been sunk, shot down, or shot on several occasions but no one has paid the ultimate price and I pray that continues.
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  #6  
Old 05-31-2004, 10:08 PM
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My uncle Clem Hurda was killed in WW2, he was a radio operator/navigator on a cargo plane flying "The Hump" in the CBI (China/Burma/India) theatre of operations and the plane crashed while trying to land in the fog.
My dad received a Purple Heart (with silver star, I guess you don't get the Purple Heart twice, they add stars to it, so basically he was wounded twice) in Korea. Shot once and shrapnel the other time. He's been gone a long time now, but an interesting story though. He was born in '26, so he could have been drafted in WW2, but had a farm deferrment. By 50 he was off the farm and I guess the farm deferrment wouldn't have mattered in Korea anyways so I heard. But the draft board sent him to Milwaukee for a physical, and they were kinda standing around the place when a couple Marines walked in a sorta said "I'll take you and you and you" and the next thing ya know my dad was a Marine. So "so much" for the Marines being a volunteer outfit my dad always said. Always laughed at MASH when they showed the guys being flown out by helicopter, both times he was wounded it he said he was transported laying on top of a tank! 'Course he was in a tank unit in the 1st Marine Div. After the aid station he went to a hospital ship both times. He said when you were on the ship, if you hadn't been circumcised that they'd do it and you'd get an extra 2 weeks away from the action, a few guys had it done and it bothered him that they'd do that just to get out of a few weeks in Korea. He didn't need it done, so maybe it was easy for him to say.
Later on back in the states he participated in an atomic bomb test, "Operation upshot/knothole".
My mom, who is 83, lost many friends and high school class-mates in WW2.
My wife also had an uncle, who passed on last year, who was in the Pacific Campaign with the Navy. His job was to ride along in these landing crafts like they used in D day, with a rifle and was to shoot "any SOB", as he put it, that refused to get off the landing craft when it was time to go.

Gilly
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  #7  
Old 05-31-2004, 10:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Snibble
I think *wishing* is the wrong word.. you wouldn't want a family member to "die", right?

Anyways.. I had a distant family member in the US Army during WWII. He met mom's aunt in Germany.. married and came to the US.

Thats as far as US forces goes. I did have family members such as my grandfather and great grandfather fight during WWI and WWII.

EDIT:

I don't have war stories from my family that deals with US forces, but I do have some interesting ones.

My grandmother's oldest sister during the early part of WWII met a Nazi officer. They began dating and so forth and then decided to get married. However, being that she was Polish and Catholic, and he was a German Protestant... the Catholic church refused to marry them. They instead got married at a Protestant church. Shortly after the marriage, he recieves a notice that he is called to duty. He was told that he only has 2 more weeks of duty, essentially one battle, and then could be released to go back. This was the last time she has ever heard of him. He was presumed KIA and his body was never found. After the war, a US army soldier met her. Make long story short... after waiting years before the Nazi officer was officially declared deceased, the two got married and moved to the US.

Another story involves my great-grandfather. He too was Polish, although with a popular German 1st name. He worked for the Siemens company. Anyhow... towards the end of the War, the Germans were desparate and used even older men, past the age of 35 to fight. He then lived near the German/Polish border... but Germans were in control. My great grandfather's brothers were stopped by the Germans and told to serve. However, they argued and one ended up shot the other hung. My great-grandfather had no choice but to serve. He was then sent to a battle(don't know the name).. where there was heavy fighting. My Great grandfather, being in his early 40's at the time, decided to pretend he was killed. After the battle, lying amongst the dead... he crawled his way out of the mess and ran into the nearby forest. From there, he found a cottage with a stable. He had nothing to eat, so he took food that was there for the animals. However, he was caught by a German lady. He explained that he's a lost soldier looking for food. The lady, having her husband die in the war, was sympathetic and invited him for some food. He spent, from what I have been told 2 nights, before making his way back home. He stopped by several churches along the way in the care of the nuns. By the time he reached back home, the Allied forces where there. He quickly ran to them, presumably without his uniform by then, and explained his situation. He was taken in by the UNRA (can't find any info on them) where he worked among them. some things he brought back home with him were US ARMY pots and pans, that even to this day my grandmother in Poland uses to make her good Polish soups.

My grandfather, during WWII was too young to join the Army. He instead was a scout in an underground resistance called "Armja Krajowa" which meant "Country's Army". Don't have much info on what he did, but all I know is that he and his resistance fought the Germans near the Warsaw area.
Gosh, that's interesting, Snib. I hope you write this stuff down for your descendents. Most of us don't and family history dies with the oldest relative.

Write down, son, write it down.

B
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  #8  
Old 05-31-2004, 10:14 PM
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My direct family has come through with minor wounds since 1776 and every war since. There's almost always somebody in the military in our family. My nephew is in Kuwait and is some kind of computer jock. One of those geeks that lives somewhere in a CPU executing microinstructions from some Satanic cult or other. His sister, my neice, is going into Military Police in Dec. She's hoping for a commission despite not having done ROTC. Had excellent grades and majored in some sort of law enforcement with a minor in poli sci.
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  #9  
Old 05-31-2004, 11:09 PM
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Thankfully, no casualties in our family.

One interesting story though..

My dad, whose name was Herman Lange, captured a German prisoner whose name was ... Herman Lange.
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  #10  
Old 06-01-2004, 12:12 AM
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No lnown war fatalities that I know of. Have familial ties all the way back to the revolutionary war.

According to an aunt, one of the these relations was granted a nice chunk of upstate New York in reward for his service. He declined the land and asked that the parcel be made into a military academy, which was later know as West Point. Unfortunately I don't know this relatives name, only the family lore.

My dad ran away from home at 16, maybe 17, used his brother birth certificate and joined the Amry in 1940. Made the D-day drop at St. Mare Iglese and the following week was dispatched to Holland with very specific orders. Although seriously wounded, he and his unit accomlished their mission and returned. For this action Sgt J.W. Tangas was awarded the Silver Star (along with a repeat Purple Heart). I only learned why he'd received the Silver Star a couple years ago, the whole time I was growing up the only thing he would say was he'd gotten "it" for "being someplace I shouldn't have been, doing something I shouldn't have been doing". About two years ago he found his original citation, showed it to me and finally told me most of the story. Reading the citation, for those who know how the typical citation reads, is completetely different in that it actually names specifics. Most citations are very generic and do not tell "the" story.
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  #11  
Old 06-01-2004, 07:14 AM
MedMech
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Mike make sure you register your father with the silver star society, it a great group. You may be able to find even more information about your fathers prestigious award.

I will PM you with the contact information. They will post .

and you bet it's in detail, due to the fact that its awarded by the Commander of the Army or congress.

Last edited by MedMech; 06-01-2004 at 07:35 AM.
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  #12  
Old 06-01-2004, 04:14 PM
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Thanks Jeff. It really would be neat to learn the rest of the story.

As far as his being wounded in Holland, he took a round to the elbow early in this engagement. Stayed in country over a week and brought back his entire detail. The American doctors wanted to cut the arm above the elbow but two other doctors in the field hospital (one french, one English) convinced the first doctor to leave the arm. Then they shipped him to England where they implanted a sheep knee, or some such joint to replace the mangled elbow. That joint lasted about a year and they replaced it with an early model stainless steel joint. That joint lasted 5 years and was replaced with an updated version made of stainless with nylon bearing surfaces.

After a long 2 year rehab at Fort Sam Houston he went back to Benning to be a DI at jump school. The artifical joint was working out so well he even pulled a couple tours in Korea.
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  #13  
Old 06-01-2004, 08:12 PM
ThrillBilly
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my uncle Staff Sgt. BL Kidd, a top gunner on a B-24. (31st mission)
shoved out unconcious before plane went down after being hit.
pilot and nav were POW for months, wrote all families upon returning home.
six crew members in common grave in st louis.

i FINALLY received this MemDay, a pic that hung in my grandparents living room as long as i remember, of the entire crew in front of the B-24 at an airbase in italy. excepting the officers, the crew looks VERY young. my uncle was 19.
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  #14  
Old 06-01-2004, 09:07 PM
MedMech
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Hi snib:

UNRA-United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration
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  #15  
Old 06-01-2004, 09:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by MedMech
Hi snib:

UNRA-United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration
Hey.. thanks a lot. When I did my search, I used "UNRA" and had little success. Thanks for finding out the full name... I knew that the UN stood for United Nations... but couldn't find the rest. With your help I found this link.. http://www.worldhistory.com/wiki/U/United-Nations-Relief-and-Rehabilitation-Administration.htm

seems to be it was a temporary relief aid that was organized during WWII. Pretty interesting. Thanks again
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