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  #1  
Old 06-02-2004, 10:47 PM
Benzman500
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Anyone here have Managment Informations Systems Degree?

I think I finally decided what I'm going to go to school for and it's a MIS degree. I was wondering if we had anyone on the boards that could offer some insight into this field.
I will be done With Daytona Beach Community College in Fall 2006 (have to stay an extra semester due to being short one class) and plan to transfer to the Universty of Central Florida or the Universty of Nebraska at Kearney (only if I must).
Any thoughts are appreciated
My plans for the next year
Fall
College Algebra
Micro Economics
Accounting I
Astronomy

Spring
Pre Calc
Accounting 2
Macro Economics
carear Planning

Summer
General Biology
Music Appreciation
Elem. Statistics

Fall 06
International Realtions
(maybe another computer class)
Or if I can dual enrollment at UCF Daytona

Last edited by Benzman500; 06-02-2004 at 10:54 PM.
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  #2  
Old 06-02-2004, 11:00 PM
Botnst's Avatar
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Can't go far wrong taking a class that requires lots of writing. The only way people learn to write coherently is by practicing writing coherently. In real life: academic, managerial, technical, if you cannot communicate effectively you're just cannon fodder.

Can't go wrong taking math. If you're lucky you'll begin to read math like you read words in a foriegn language. Arithmatic is spelling, algebra is the syntax, calculus is the literature.

Take a foreign language. Choose one that is highly structured like Spanish. There are some excellent tapes that will give you a great boost toward understanding the spoken word in another language. Then take the language in college and look smart.

Work hard. Try for an A on very quiz and every paper. Put the social life on hold. You'll be a bettter catch to a better class of people if you have self-discipline and an education.

B
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  #3  
Old 06-03-2004, 01:01 AM
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MIS degrees ain't what they used to be. Best advice nowadays is to get a two year degree in MIS or CS, and then get a four year degree in a buiness area, accounting, mangement science, finance, etc. Most companies want project management types who understand core business areas, with strong computer skills a major plus. If all you have to offer is the computer skills, you'll find yourself competing against a bunch of Chinese and Indian guys, and they work pretty cheap.
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  #4  
Old 06-03-2004, 01:03 PM
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I graduated from UCF in 1989 with a B.S. in Computer Science. I think that the MIS degree is more limiting to your future opportunities than a CS degree. The CS curriculum is not much harder than MIS, and will allow you to get any job you can get with an MIS degree plus hard core coding jobs that you could not otherwise get. And while in pursuit of a BSCS, you can still take the accounting and management courses that make you attractive to business.

The schedule you've laid out is missing the courses that will make you write, such as Freshman English. Unless it has been repealed since I was in school, the "Gordon Rule" will make sure you cannot graduate from college in Florida without writing a whole big bunch. I think it was something like 12,000 words. When that rule took effect, it turned all the "softer" courses like English, history, and humanities into much tougher courses because they make you write essays like crazy. You'll be much better served by taking those courses at the junior college level where they are more likely to make some attempt to actually teach you the material. Save the economics, accounting, and statistics for the 4 year university where they will delve into more detail (which you need) and you'll learn it faster.

If you're planning to transfer from a 2 year college to a 4 year university (as it appears you are), be sure to do it with an A.A., not an A.S. There's a subtle difference in the degrees, and trying to transfer with an A.S. means you'll end up repeating classes.
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  #5  
Old 06-03-2004, 02:11 PM
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Having spent about 20 years in the business I advise against it. While it can be lucrative, and is most definitely interesting, you need to be tenacious and addicted to learning and problem solving in a big way. The never ending procession of new ways to do the same things along with the never ending litany of new things will wear you down a few years down the road, and make you wish you’d never pursued the path. Look into becoming a doc, a lawyer, a scientist, a professor. They require a slightly longer up front effort but it pays off in a lifetime of comparative ease.
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  #6  
Old 06-03-2004, 02:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Lebenz
Having spent about 20 years in the business I advise against it. While it can be lucrative, and is most definitely interesting, you need to be tenacious and addicted to learning and problem solving in a big way. The never ending procession of new ways to do the same things along with the never ending litany of new things will wear you down a few years down the road, and make you wish you’d never pursued the path. Look into becoming a doc, a lawyer, a scientist, a professor. They require a slightly longer up front effort but it pays off in a lifetime of comparative ease.
Thats the damn truth. I've been in the computer business for 30 years and I have never stopped going to school. I am essentially repeating the same course over and over just to keep up - Intro to Pascal became Intro to Vb become Intro to VB 6, now I'm taking Intro to VB.NET. Same thing on the database side. From Dbase to SQL 7 to Access 9.0, I've had to take a course in them all over a 30 year period. 90% of what I learned is now obsolete crap in an bargain bin. It is never ending. I envy the people who mow lawns for a living.
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  #7  
Old 06-03-2004, 02:19 PM
MedMech
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If you get a MIS degree it would be a get idea to get a pilots license as well to reduce travel time to India for work.
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  #8  
Old 06-03-2004, 02:21 PM
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You guys just never found the right horse to ride. Oracle for 10 years now and still going.
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  #9  
Old 06-03-2004, 02:27 PM
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I'll tell you whats an emerging area for a college kid - thats a B.S in Electronic Communications from your college's communication department, with a minor or AA in computer science. That will put you into the B to B internet stuff that is going to be the hot stuff over the next decade, and the exposure to Internet graphic design will give you a foot in the door on B to C as well. Coders are going to be a dime a dozen, which is the going hourly rate in Vietnam right now( I kid you not) for a coder. Graphic site designers who communicate well in English and can code in ASP are going to get a nice job. MIS is really just left over stuff when the IT department was the mysterious king of computers. A lot of the professors who teach it are still stuck in that world as well. Its going and gone. Your average accounting department can get a kid to do the stuff they used to depend on MIS to do. Listen to Medmech.

Last edited by KirkVining; 06-03-2004 at 02:33 PM.
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  #10  
Old 06-03-2004, 02:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Rick Miley
You guys just never found the right horse to ride. Oracle for 10 years now and still going.
Sorry man, I am a citizen of the Evil Empire. I just road my horse thru the worst depression the computer business has ever seen, and I'm still in business. SQL Server 2000 will rule you!

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  #11  
Old 06-03-2004, 02:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Lebenz
Having spent about 20 years in the business I advise against it. While it can be lucrative, and is most definitely interesting, you need to be tenacious and addicted to learning and problem solving in a big way. The never ending procession of new ways to do the same things along with the never ending litany of new things will wear you down a few years down the road, and make you wish you’d never pursued the path. Look into becoming a doc, a lawyer, a scientist, a professor. They require a slightly longer up front effort but it pays off in a lifetime of comparative ease.
I agree 100% with LeBenz,
I have a BS degree in CSC and the jobs are all going to India.
Become a doctor and you will get well compensated, prestige and choice of fine women. Yeah, women love doctors.
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  #12  
Old 06-03-2004, 03:18 PM
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I don't think a four year degree in any computer field is worth the work anymore unless your going to work for the sake of pure science, like NASA for instance. The two year degree with a four year business related or skip it and go for the white coat and the chicks - computer guys just don't cut. Women figure they'll be bangin the keyboard all night instead of.....
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  #13  
Old 06-03-2004, 10:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by KirkVining
...and the chicks - computer guys just don't cut. Women figure they'll be bangin the keyboard all night instead of.....
Nice!
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  #14  
Old 06-03-2004, 11:38 PM
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if you get tired of working indoors and want to work at something
manly.:p, take courses in: right angle trig, spanish, blueprint reading, cost estimating, and technical/contract reading and writing.
you will have a tan, stay in shape and kids will know what you
do for a living

don
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  #15  
Old 06-06-2004, 10:42 PM
Benzman500
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Quote:
Originally posted by Rick Miley
[B
The schedule you've laid out is missing the courses that will make you write, such as Freshman English. Unless it has been repealed since I was in school, the "Gordon Rule" will make sure you cannot graduate from college in Florida without writing a whole big bunch. I think it was something like 12,000 words. When that rule took effect, it turned all the "softer" courses like English, history, and humanities into much tougher courses because they make you write essays like crazy. You'll be much better served by taking those courses at the junior college level where they are more likely to make some attempt to actually teach you the material. Save the economics, accounting, and statistics for the 4 year university where they will delve into more detail (which you need) and you'll learn it faster.

If you're planning to transfer from a 2 year college to a 4 year university (as it appears you are), be sure to do it with an A.A., not an A.S. There's a subtle difference in the degrees, and trying to transfer with an A.S. means you'll end up repeating classes. [/B]
Did'nt post all of the classes since my first years has been mostly my core classes like math, english, psy, etc.
Well has for the Doctor/Lawyer field it's not for me. Not smart enough don't have the money for the schooling and have no real big intreast in them. All though business law does also appeal to me.
The big problem I have is I don't know what I want to do and this is just one of the few things I found that combinds the things I'm good at business/computers. Allthough I'm not great with math I'm very good with doing it in my head and for some reason I can figure out complex problems pretty easily.
Thanks for your thoughts guys I still am unsure of what I will do but for right now it gets me pointed in a direction
PS
Sorry for the late reply I have been working non stop trying to get ahead
1pm to 420am thur-fri
sat 430-930
sun 12-10 Pressure washed the store
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