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  #1  
Old 02-06-2001, 10:56 PM
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I'm planning to flush the brake fluid this weekend. The 4M wagon does not have ASR. I've got the CD's and it seems a pretty straight forward job. I plan on using a SpeediBleeder which says to use 15 psi. The MB CD says use 2 bar - closer to 30psi any thoughts?
Also the CD warns not to siphon the reservoir below 10mm of fluids so as to protect from introducing air into the system. I've heard other advice that says to siphon all the fluid from the reservoir and clean out any residue with a lint free rag. Both methods have their upside. Any recommendations?
TIA
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  #2  
Old 02-07-2001, 12:06 AM
dlswnfrd
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Hazen Arnold

Go to http://home.earthlink.net/~asherson/don and you will find exactly what you need to flush your brake fluid the proper way.
Flush every spring, per your owners manual.
Use Dot 4 or synthetic brake fluid per your owners manual.
Happy Trails Beep Beep from Houston
Donald, El Cheapo

[Edited by Donald L. Swinford on 02-06-2001 at 11:12 PM]
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  #3  
Old 02-07-2001, 12:14 AM
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Beep, Beep Donald!
This is what passes for spring in the Seattle area! More than anything i was needing a project this weekend and I love solid brakes.
Thanks for the tip,
Best,
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  #4  
Old 02-07-2001, 01:44 AM
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How ever you opt to drain and change your brake fluid, when bleeding the brakes keep the resevoir full at all times. The rear section of these resevoirs are easy to run dry. It is especially difficult to tell the level of all new brake fluid, it is nearly invisible. I suggest topping off (ensuring both sections are full) every third crack of the bleeder screw.
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  #5  
Old 02-07-2001, 01:49 AM
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Mike,

YaMoBeDer!

Larry
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  #6  
Old 02-07-2001, 01:55 AM
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Mike,
Thank you for your help. I will keep an eagle eye on the reservoir level. Do you think it ok to suck out all the old and clean the reservoir before adding new, or should I leave 10mm of old?
Best,
Hazen

Larry me lad,
I'm not sure what the message was, but methinks you might consider cutting back your meds by 1/2!
L&K,
HSA
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  #7  
Old 02-07-2001, 01:59 AM
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Hazen,

I really like your signature phrase.

I apologize for cluttering up your thread with a private message to Mike. I was confirming that I would meet him for breakfast. You know, Yeah, I'm gonna be there!

Have a great day,
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  #8  
Old 02-07-2001, 02:06 AM
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Larry,
No apologies necessary, my good man. Just afraid you might have slipped a link on your timing chain!
Thanks for the compliment! Ain't it so!
Best,
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  #9  
Old 02-07-2001, 02:15 AM
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I think you're right about MY timing chain. The ones in my cars are right on though.

And, yes, it's so.

Regards,
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  #10  
Old 02-07-2001, 02:17 AM
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Hazen,

Personally I would drain the system entirely. I use a stub of rubber line, loosen the bleeder screw put the line on and drain into a clear jar. I do this for each wheel, when all are drained, I top off the resevoir and commence bleeding starting at the right rear. You will get some grungy fluid with air, that is the fluid that remains in the lower portion of the calipers, when the fluid is clear and free from air, secure the bleeder and move to the left rear. Remember to top off every third crack of the screw.

Larry,

Got the message, and I'll be there.
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'73 280SEL 4.5 (9/72)- RIP
Only 8,173 units built from 5/71 thru 11/72

'02 CLK320 Cabriolet - wifey's mid-life crisis

2012 VW Jetta Sportwagon TDI...at least its a diesel

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  #11  
Old 02-07-2001, 10:31 AM
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When I did the most recent brake fluid purges (300TE & 500E), I drilled a hole in the reservoirs and sucked out ALL the fluid using my shop vac. I then pulled the old reservoirs (without spilling a drop, as they were empty) and replaced them. When doing so, it provides you with the opportunity to clean the orifices leading to the master cylinder, which were a bit messy in the TE (which has always had its fluid changed every other year before my annual changes began). The reservoirs are cheap, and come with the two seals required.

Just thought I'd throw this out there, because keeping an eye on the brake fluid level is quite a bit easier with a new reservoir. Good luck!
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  #12  
Old 02-07-2001, 04:42 PM
LarryBible
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Michael,

Not a bad suggestion. How much does a reservoir cost?

Have a great day,
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  #13  
Old 02-07-2001, 10:26 PM
dlswnfrd
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Mike, Larry and all

You can eliminate the monkeying around and worrying about keeping the master cylinder full if you take a look at:
http://home.earthlink.net/~asherson/Don

It really behuves me to read you fellows hints to each other about a job that can be made so simple.

This will make bleeding or changing the brake fluid a one man job.

Happy Trails Beep Beep from Houston
Donald, El Cheapo Buttenski
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  #14  
Old 02-07-2001, 10:44 PM
LarryBible
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Donald,

Great job on the brake bleeder. I bought one from an ad in the Star magazine that works great. I believe I gave about $44.95 for it. The only thing that it has, that yours does not have is a pressure guage. The small pressure guages are not expensive if you want to go crazy and get fancy.

I only glanced at yours, but as I remember, you have a swivel joint for the filler cap application. The $44.95 one does not. You sort of have to wind up the hose, then thread it on so that the hose is not in a pigtail.

I wish I had seen yours before I bought my $44.95 one. I am glad I have it though. It seems I was always at the mercy of whoever was around that might help me bleed the brakes. Both my kids and my wife are accomplished brake bleeding pedal pumpers.

Have a great day,
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  #15  
Old 02-07-2001, 10:51 PM
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I'm with you, Donald; I do all of my purges myself with a pressure bleeder. I just addes my comments for the less well-tooled guys out there, and those that might be daunted by a reservoir change-out.

Great comments throughout, folks, on a very important safety topic.
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