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  #1  
Old 09-30-2007, 08:16 PM
RNCarl's Avatar
aka: dadsdiesel
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 63
Unhappy snapped hard steel brake line!

Hi,
When doing the brakes, I snapped a steel brake line trying to remove the old rubber line at the chassis. AAAUUUGGHHH!!!

The calipers were a Ba$ta#d And now I am totally frustrated!

I was trying to "ignore" the rust on the steel lines.... but...

After doing a search here, and peeking under the sub-frame above the rear suspension assy...



So where do I buy the line? can I get it from a "big-box" parts store? flaring tool? connectors.... Whhaaaaaa........

C

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1983 Mercedes 300SD [OMG - What Have I Done!] Just Aquired - Brake job under way. Then she will be greased!

2006 Jeep Liberty Limited [2.8L CRD - a noisy little Italian, just like my wife]

2006 Toyota Sienna [The Wuss-Moblie] My daily driver... Hey, it's a company car, I can't help it.

My dad always said, "Son, you may only look like a fool, but when you open your mouth, you remove all doubt."
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  #2  
Old 09-30-2007, 08:44 PM
Monomer's Avatar
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Detroit, MI
Posts: 836
I've just went through this.


Get the lines from the dealer. It was $60 total for the hardlines running to the the back. They come cut to length, but not bent - so you'll have to install them yourself.

Making a bubble flare with any tool costing less than $300 is a PITA, and simply not worth the fight.
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  #3  
Old 09-30-2007, 11:57 PM
RNCarl's Avatar
aka: dadsdiesel
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monomer View Post
I've just went through this.


Get the lines from the dealer. It was $60 total for the hardlines running to the the back. They come cut to length, but not bent - so you'll have to install them yourself.

Making a bubble flare with any tool costing less than $300 is a PITA, and simply not worth the fight.
$60? really that cheap? Did you bend them with a tubing bender?

It looks like there is one line coming from the front that tee's off to right and left rear?

I want to do the steel fuel lines then too. For that though I have thought of running a HIH heated so I can use a high blend of bio-d all winter.

GGrrr... I want this thing on the road.

C.
__________________
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1983 Mercedes 300SD [OMG - What Have I Done!] Just Aquired - Brake job under way. Then she will be greased!

2006 Jeep Liberty Limited [2.8L CRD - a noisy little Italian, just like my wife]

2006 Toyota Sienna [The Wuss-Moblie] My daily driver... Hey, it's a company car, I can't help it.

My dad always said, "Son, you may only look like a fool, but when you open your mouth, you remove all doubt."
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  #4  
Old 10-01-2007, 04:16 AM
t walgamuth's Avatar
dieselarchitect
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Lafayette Indiana
Posts: 34,760
You can buy a bender but they are easily bent by hand using your thumbs to support the tubing as it is bent. You just have to bend the line while your thumbs support the inside of the curve you are bending so that you don't kink it.

Before buying all the lines, I would look at them and see if they are rusty. If they are not rusty there is no reason to replace them. YOu are replacing this because you damaged accidently replacing the rubber line not becasue it is rusty.

Tom W
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[SIGPIC] Diesel loving autocrossing grandpa Architect. 08 Dodge 3/4 ton with Cummins & six speed; I have had about 35 benzes. I have a 39 Studebaker Coupe Express pickup in which I have had installed a 617 turbo and a five speed manual.[SIGPIC]

..I also have a 427 Cobra replica with an aluminum chassis.
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  #5  
Old 10-01-2007, 08:36 AM
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0-60 in 10 minutes flat
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Middletown MD
Posts: 527
Go to your favorite hardware store or plumbing supply and get a good quality tubing bender. They aren't much more than $20 and are really useful. That way you won't have to worry about putting kinks into your new lines!
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  #6  
Old 10-01-2007, 10:44 AM
RNCarl's Avatar
aka: dadsdiesel
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by t walgamuth View Post
You can buy a bender but they are easily bent by hand using your thumbs to support the tubing as it is bent. You just have to bend the line while your thumbs support the inside of the curve you are bending so that you don't kink it.

Before buying all the lines, I would look at them and see if they are rusty. If they are not rusty there is no reason to replace them. YOu are replacing this because you damaged accidently replacing the rubber line not becasue it is rusty.

Tom W

Oh no,

They are ALL rusty. I was trying to IGNORE that they are rusty. The car has been in New England most of its life and has sat idle off and on for several years. It started its life as a salesman's car in NJ then was sold at auction to someone up here.

I would rather suffer the pains of replacing them now than have one let go in the cold weather disabling the car for the rest of the winter. This is a veggie experiment car and is therefore an "extra" which has become a money pit!

The question I guess is, can I replace them inexpensively. She is up on jack stands right now and I would perfer to "get'er done" now before it gets cold.

Besides, the other three connectors from the other rubber hoses are just as rusted. I suspect a similar situation will occur when I try to remove them.

Actually the front calipers didn't look to bad but I am replacing them anyway. I want my time to go to perfecting a veggie system not routine maintainence.

C.
__________________
.

1983 Mercedes 300SD [OMG - What Have I Done!] Just Aquired - Brake job under way. Then she will be greased!

2006 Jeep Liberty Limited [2.8L CRD - a noisy little Italian, just like my wife]

2006 Toyota Sienna [The Wuss-Moblie] My daily driver... Hey, it's a company car, I can't help it.

My dad always said, "Son, you may only look like a fool, but when you open your mouth, you remove all doubt."
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  #7  
Old 10-01-2007, 12:20 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 174
Brake line connections

I have had luck freeing up frozen connections at the rubber to metal brake line junction by spraying with a good penetrant (PB Blaster or Aero Kroil) over several days and then using the proper sized flare nut tool and at the worse case scenario either using a propane torch with a homebrew needle nozzle directly on the frozen connection nut and then spraying the metal brake line with "Insta Freeze" which breaks the bond between the line and the lock fitting OR use a dremel tool with a carbide wheel and cut across the fiting PARALELL to the line until you are almost through and then split the fitting.

Both methods turn the rubber line and the fitting into trash but most times I was replacing the rubber lines with braided hoses. I have heard some folks claim the heat up method left the fitting still in useable condition...

I guess it depends on how much you use the "blue tipped wrench"!
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  #8  
Old 10-11-2007, 04:49 PM
Monomer's Avatar
Colonel Blitz
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Detroit, MI
Posts: 836
You should NEVER heat brake line. It's a spiral tube, and heat kills it. Steel/braided lines are also a waste of money. The OEM lines are $10/each; and are made for that car.

No, there isn't a difference in feel. People who say that there is; are the ones replacing them after 80+ thousand miles, and prob. had bad lines to begin with.


3/16 line is bent easily with your hands. you'll need a bender for the 5/16 lines (they kink if you try to bend them by hand.) The bender I bought at Harbor Freight works just fine, and costs less than $5.

"Inline Tubing" will fab. brand new lines, pre-bent. Their located in shelby township Michigan. Shipping would be a PITA, though.
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  #9  
Old 10-12-2007, 12:39 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 119
I bought a tube bender from Autozone to make up a fuel line on my boat - it was for the larger 5/16" metal tubing that I also bought from Autozone with the flared fittings already installed. The bender bent the tube alright but flattened it at the same time. Could have been operator error...

Maybe those cheap benders work OK on the smaller tubing but i have a suspicion i didn't spend enough money.

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