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  #1  
Old 11-14-2008, 12:29 PM
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Clamping fuel hoses during w124 fuel filter change

I've read the posts regarding the filterchange procedure, but I would appreciate advice on how to use/tape/modify my vicegrips to avoid destroying the rubber fuel hoses. I do not have any clamps/pliers designed for this job. As a related question, if the tank is low on gas, wouldn't it be a good idea to avoid pinching the hoses altogether and just let the tank drain into one of those plastic, portable 5 gallon gas containers, and after the filter is changed just pour the fuel back into the tank? Thanks.

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  #2  
Old 11-14-2008, 12:42 PM
ForcedInduction
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Bend the hose over itself and use tape or a ziptie to hold it down.
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Old 11-14-2008, 12:44 PM
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A couple of pieces of wood shim should be plenty of protection for the hoses. It won't take very much pressure at all. You're just trying to stop air from leaking in, not meld the sides of the hose together.

I don't really see the significance of how much fuel is in the tank. Or the need to drain it.

To avoid all of this, I installed a small inline hand pump in the fuel system to prime it and push all the air out. It works really well. You can find one at your local marine supply store. I can put on a DRY fuel filter and start it on the first turn of the key.
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Old 11-14-2008, 01:45 PM
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I have a few hemostats that I use when fishing and I set aside the flatest one for this purpose.

Tank draining? Seems like a lot of work.

Vise grips may work as long as you set the opening wide enough so it does cut the hose.
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Old 11-14-2008, 02:05 PM
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Can you provide pics and the model of the pump you used? I like this idea.

Andy

Quote:
Originally Posted by grindMARC View Post
A couple of pieces of wood shim should be plenty of protection for the hoses. It won't take very much pressure at all. You're just trying to stop air from leaking in, not meld the sides of the hose together.

I don't really see the significance of how much fuel is in the tank. Or the need to drain it.

To avoid all of this, I installed a small inline hand pump in the fuel system to prime it and push all the air out. It works really well. You can find one at your local marine supply store. I can put on a DRY fuel filter and start it on the first turn of the key.
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Old 11-14-2008, 02:46 PM
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This is very similar to the one I have. It goes by the name "primer bulb" at your local marine supply store.

Put this thing between your hardline and the first fuel filter in the engine compartment. Have someone stick their ear by the fuel filler with the cap off, have them holler when they hear the bubbles stop.

Note/disclaimer: I do not have this installed in my engine compartment. My diesel comes from a small racing tank in the trunk and I have the pump installed back there. Veggie oil is in my main tank. I can't imagine there will be any difference in its effectiveness if its placed in the engine compartment.
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  #7  
Old 11-14-2008, 08:43 PM
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I don't see a need to clamp the hose at all. A little fuel will leak out of the lines but the tank won't drain though the fuel pump. As for the air in the lines it's not an issue. Turn the key on a few times to run the pump and you are primed and ready to go. No need to make it harder than it really is.
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  #8  
Old 11-15-2008, 11:47 AM
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I have used Vice-grips(R) as a hose clamp by putting a couple of pieces of vinyl tubing on the jaws to pad them. Use 1/2 inch tubing, cut the pieces about an inch long and slit them lengthwise, then push them over the jaws.

Another option is to plug the hose rather than clamp it. Depending on the size of the hose, you may be able to find a Phillips screwdriver that fits into the hose, then tighten the hose clamp.

Jeremy
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  #9  
Old 11-15-2008, 12:02 PM
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I keep a stash of golf tees and plastic cap plugs for this purpose. I use them most often to plug brake lines when removing calipers.
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  #10  
Old 11-15-2008, 03:47 PM
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The "professional" clamps made for this job are not very expensive.

http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/item.asp?search=true&item_ID=66783&PartNo=ya2850a&group_id=1461&supersede=&store=snapon-store&tool=all

Try $7.25 for the pair.

It's more expensive in terms of your time to adapt something not made for the job.
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