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  #1  
Old 04-16-2003, 12:49 PM
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Location: Orlando, FL
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Fuel lines

I am wanting to replace the fuel lines in my 420, since I have read in this forum that they rust on the inside causing junk to get into your fuel distributor and injectors causing the infamous rough idle. The problem being is that I have a 420SE. Probably upwards of 95% of parts for US cars are the same as mine....and this one would be too I'm sure...except that my lines have to be shorter than ones for a SEL! Sooo....my question: are the fuel lines from a 300SE the same? I guess the main question would be the connections up at the engine.

If a US part won't work, it's not that big of a deal since my sister is going to Germany in about a month and she can pick them up for me as well as a few other things, but if I can get the parts over here and save her the trouble I will.
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'86 420SE Euro
904 Midnight Blue, Gray Velour
Dad bought it new, now I own it.

"A Mercedes-Benz is like a fine wine, it only gets better with age."
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  #2  
Old 04-16-2003, 11:03 PM
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No takers on this one??
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'86 420SE Euro
904 Midnight Blue, Gray Velour
Dad bought it new, now I own it.

"A Mercedes-Benz is like a fine wine, it only gets better with age."
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  #3  
Old 04-17-2003, 12:01 AM
dmorrison's Avatar
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I don't know if the euro and US lines are the same, but "pick one up for me" the fuel line goes from the tank at the rear axel to the center of the engine compartment. Not exactly an item she car put in the over head bin!!!!
You can buy steel line from Summitt Racing and a tube bender and make your own. Buy the spring style tube benders you can get at Home Depot in the plumbing Dept. They are much easier.
Removing the old line will require some work.

Dave
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1970 220D, owned 1980-1990
1980 240D, owned 1990-1992
1982 300TD, owned 1992-1993
1986 300SDL, owned 1993-2004
1999 E300, owned 1999-2003
1982 300TD, 213,880mi, owned since Nov 18, 1991- Aug 4, 2010 SOLD
1988 560SL, 100,000mi, owned since 1995
1965 Mustang Fastback Mileage Unknown(My sons)
1983 240D, 176,000mi (My daughers) owned since 2004
2007 Honda Accord EX-L I4 auto, the new daily driver
1985 300D 264,000mi Son's new daily driver.(sold)
2008 Hyundai Tiberon. Daughters new car
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  #4  
Old 04-17-2003, 11:26 AM
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Not a bad idea...making my own. How would I go about the R&R of the fittings on the end of the fuel lines?

If I make my own, do these things absolutely have to be metal? Wouldn't some high pressure flexible tubing work the same?

Thanks for your suggestion.
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'86 420SE Euro
904 Midnight Blue, Gray Velour
Dad bought it new, now I own it.

"A Mercedes-Benz is like a fine wine, it only gets better with age."
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  #5  
Old 04-17-2003, 11:40 AM
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Dave...look at this line that I found on the Summit website. Click here and go to fuel lines and then down to the Spectre SSteel-Flex fuel lines. Sounds like a winner to me if I know how to attach the MB fittings on the ends!
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'86 420SE Euro
904 Midnight Blue, Gray Velour
Dad bought it new, now I own it.

"A Mercedes-Benz is like a fine wine, it only gets better with age."
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  #6  
Old 04-17-2003, 01:50 PM
inspector1
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I can and will argue that 'rusting' of brake lines internally would be very , very hard to do as rusting is the oxidation of iron 2 to iron 3 which requires oxygen, a gas line is, in general, allways full of gas, so explain to me how rusting can occur.

After reading this forum for almost a year, I find it more humorous than helpful, but it has enabled me to understand why some vehicles are so incredibly screwed up when someone sells/buys them...DIY'fers
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  #7  
Old 04-17-2003, 03:56 PM
moedip
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inspector1
Rusting gas lines is not hard to believe. Items in contact with water -rust - no oxygen in air there - no air period. But there is oxygen as the make up of water. Water will cause steel to rust. There can be water in the gas line as well as the tank. You can get it from the gas station if their tanks are running low and you get it from condensation from extreme temperature changes. My line along the bottom of the car was so rusted inside - it collapsed and broke in two when I removed it. You can argue that it cannot happen, but as GOD is my witness - it happened to me. My car was parked for 3 years which may have exasperated the problem. Just thinking - if rust cannot happen with gas in the tank and lines - why did they change the gas tanks to plastic from steel? Remember the "Seals-all" goop to stop gas from leaking out of rusting out gas tanks to extend their life? Sometimes truth is stranger than fiction.
By the way - I take it as an affront that you infer that DIYer's "incredibly screw up" cars. I have worked on my 560sel, 5 VW diesels, my son's 928 Porsche and 2 GM cars for several years and they run great. I have rebuilt several engines, do all my own mechanical and body work and get a lot of pleasure from it. While SOME DIYer's may not be mechanically inclined - many others are. Are you saying that contributors to this board like Mike Tangas and Hbofinger who are DIYers and have helped many others to do major work their 560 sel's are "HUMOROUS"?
Too bad you find us DIYers helping each other on this board as "humerous screw up artists". There may come a time where you have to eat your words and ask a DIYer for help with your car.
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  #8  
Old 04-17-2003, 04:43 PM
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Location: Orlando, FL
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Thanks moedip. I'll trust your experience. I've got a rough idle, and this looks like a good, relatively inexpensive try....before dumping hundreds or even thousands of dollars into other stuff that doesn't end up making any difference.

What do you think about that fuel line in my last post?
__________________
'86 420SE Euro
904 Midnight Blue, Gray Velour
Dad bought it new, now I own it.

"A Mercedes-Benz is like a fine wine, it only gets better with age."
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  #9  
Old 04-17-2003, 04:48 PM
moedip
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Jack up the rear of your car and look at the fitting for the fuel line - a picture is worth a thousand words. When you see what is required -it will guide you. It's been over a year since I did mine and the only thing that sticks in my mind is the end of the line by the tank was flexible not solid. Let me know!!!
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