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  #1  
Old 07-04-2003, 08:01 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Twin Cities area (Minnesota)
Posts: 16
Oxygenated fuel

Here in MN, the powers that be have seen fit to give the farmers a boost by requiring that nearly all gasoline sold contain 10% oxygenated fuel (gasohol made from corn). Some dealers sell non-oxygenated fuel but it is posted to be used only in antique or collector cars, boat motors, or snomobiles.

I've heard very mixed messages on using this stuff. The non-oxygenated fuel sold is unleaded, but the pump at the station I buy it from has a larger dispenser nozzle that does not fit in the smaller fuel filler hole on unleaded cars. I've made an adaptor to fit the nozzle on one end and my car on the other.

Any opinions as to the use of oxygenated fuel in MB cars? Mine is a 1991 420SEL.

Thanks
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  #2  
Old 07-04-2003, 11:22 PM
BlackE55
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Star Tribune (Paul Brand)

Paul Brand: Oxygenated fuel additives sacrifice mileage

Not exactly what you were looking for, but being born and bread in Mpls, found it interesting. Plus Paul Brand has a great show on AM-1500.

I've used it in my 560SEL and have noticed no difference. Here in WI, the stations which sell MTBE blends have labeled pumps, but nozzles are the same.

Now that I think of it, I've used it in my 10.25:1, 472 cubey Cadillac with no ill effects.
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  #3  
Old 07-05-2003, 12:05 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Twin Cities area (Minnesota)
Posts: 16
Ted,

Thanks for that link. I did not consider the decline in mileage with ethanol, but I now have another reason to keep putting in the non-oxygenated fuel. I buy it at Mills Fleet Farm in Lakeville, but I'm sure it's available elsewhere.

I remember reading somewhere else once that ethanol dries out seals in an engine. That's my main concern, as I just had my 420SEL motor rebuilt last year.
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  #4  
Old 07-05-2003, 01:36 PM
BlackE55
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You're welcome. I also found this from the Shell website.


"Do oxygenated fuels and reformulated fuels have an increased risk of fuel system leaks, and consequently increased risk of vehicle fires?

Some rubber materials used in fuel system hoses and seals in vehicles before the 1980 model year, MAY have been susceptible to damage by oxygenates, especially alcohols. Vehicle’s built after the 1979 model year have fuel system parts resistant to most gasoline oxygenates. Some parts may not be resistant to methanol, but Shell gasolines do not contain methanol. In addition gasolines formulated with property extremes may lead to fuel system leaks. However, Shell has specifications to assure Shell gasolines do not have these property extremes.

With passage of so many years, and consequent aging and wear, it is likely parts susceptible to damage have since been replaced by more modern, oxygenate resistant materials in the vast majority of cars. Normal aging and wear of fuel system components can contribute to fuel system problems. Therefore it is prudent to periodically inspect and service fuel systems as vehicles get older or accumulate miles - whether using conventional, reformulated, or oxygenated gasolines. If you suspect the fuel system parts in your car are at risk, have the fuel system inspected and serviced by your car repair agency. Studies with reformulated and oxygenated gasolines of moderate properties have shown no more risk of fuel leaks than conventional gasolines."

Anecdotally speaking, having owned pre-1970 Detroit iron, it was not uncommon for carb rebuild, esp. on those cars which I drove as daily summer drivers. Modern fuel sped up the drying/hardening of the rubber pieces.
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  #5  
Old 07-05-2003, 01:57 PM
Newbie Benz Driver
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Between Oakland and Vallejo, CA
Posts: 253
Re: Oxygenated fuel

Quote:
Originally posted by Morocco
Here in MN, the powers that be have seen fit to give the farmers a boost by requiring that nearly all gasoline sold contain 10% oxygenated fuel (gasohol made from corn). Some dealers sell non-oxygenated fuel but it is posted to be used only in antique or collector cars, boat motors, or snomobiles.

I've heard very mixed messages on using this stuff. The non-oxygenated fuel sold is unleaded, but the pump at the station I buy it from has a larger dispenser nozzle that does not fit in the smaller fuel filler hole on unleaded cars. I've made an adaptor to fit the nozzle on one end and my car on the other.

Any opinions as to the use of oxygenated fuel in MB cars? Mine is a 1991 420SEL.

Thanks
Same thing in Cali. Except we are phasing out MTBE. Mercedes does have standards for using oxygenated fuel, look in the owner's manual. It also varies from supplier to supplier, as some gasolines get different mileages, i notice cars using Arco fuel use more fuel than ones using Chevron fuel.
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