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  #1  
Old 01-27-2007, 10:10 PM
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Pre WWII Lubrication

What modern lubricatant would be recommended for pre WWII transmissions and read ends?
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  #2  
Old 01-28-2007, 11:42 AM
300SDog's Avatar
gimme a low-tech 240D
 
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Dan, we need more information. What kinda car are you talking about? Are the gaskets and seals made of modern materials or old? Could be anything from compressed cork to primitive rubber compound. For example, asbestos rope engine seals on the fintail M180 engines prevents the use of synthetics that bleed right through em. Even nylon seals in 114/115 power steering pumps can eventually leak if the wrong fluid with strange detergent additives is used.

Safest bet is probly *non-detergent* straight weight oil in recommended weight ie 50,60,70, etc that can best be found at Harley Davidson MC shops. And what kind of oil did they have at the time?

Does anybody remember The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck? It used to be required reading. Oaklahoma Jode family during the Great Depression heading West in their broken down pre-war jallopy. When they spoke of buying a decent used car for the journey, it was mentioned that sawdust dumped into differentials would hide a bad set of gears. And when their vehicle broke down and needed rings, they wrapped heavy guage single strand copper wire around the piston grooves. Soft metal copper would coat the scored bores. One of the greatest road-trip stories of all time.




This is a great topic, we need to hear more about pre-war cars.
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Old 01-28-2007, 12:23 PM
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presuming it's a prewar mercedes, just call the classic center and they'll tell you precisely what to use. -CTH
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Old 01-28-2007, 09:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 240Dog View Post
Dan, we need more information. What kinda car are you talking about? Are the gaskets and seals made of modern materials or old? Could be anything from compressed cork to primitive rubber compound. For example, asbestos rope engine seals on the fintail M180 engines prevents the use of synthetics that bleed right through em. Even nylon seals in 114/115 power steering pumps can eventually leak if the wrong fluid with strange detergent additives is used.

Safest bet is probly *non-detergent* straight weight oil in recommended weight ie 50,60,70, etc that can best be found at Harley Davidson MC shops. And what kind of oil did they have at the time?

Does anybody remember The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck? It used to be required reading. Oaklahoma Jode family during the Great Depression heading West in their broken down pre-war jallopy. When they spoke of buying a decent used car for the journey, it was mentioned that sawdust dumped into differentials would hide a bad set of gears. And when their vehicle broke down and needed rings, they wrapped heavy guage single strand copper wire around the piston grooves. Soft metal copper would coat the scored bores. One of the greatest road-trip stories of all time.




This is a great topic, we need to hear more about pre-war cars.
it was either a packard or dodge sedan made into a truck iirc. they also would replace bearings with leather. it didnt last long but they would get down the road a piece and then replace the leather again.

as i remember grandma died a bit before they reached the california border and they had her in back. at the border the guards looked in back. they told him grandma didn't feel well before he looked. he came back and said she looked really sick, better get going. they had been afraid they wouldnt be allowed to enter with a dead body. sad but interesting story.

tom w
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Old 01-29-2007, 12:24 AM
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That's one of my favorite all time books. Probably one of 2 or 3 books that was actually worth reading in high school.
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  #6  
Old 01-29-2007, 01:38 AM
John Holmes III
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Carleton would know much better than I, but I seem to recall an issue with modern gear oil having a reaction with the bronze bushings found in older vehicle, also never use detergent oil in a car engine that had had non-detergent in it.
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  #7  
Old 01-29-2007, 02:18 AM
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gimme a low-tech 240D
 
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Originally Posted by t walgamuth View Post
it was either a packard or dodge sedan made into a truck iirc. they also would replace bearings with leather. it didnt last long but they would get down the road a piece and then replace the leather again.
For sure, you had to be a cobbler even making your own parts to keep them on the road. The simplicity is astonishing. Friend has 1927 Buick and you pull the wooden floorboards to access the drive train. Doors are sheet metal wrapped around wooden frames with carriage hinges and twist grip door handle, no locks. Quality components, alot of nickel metal. And under the hood practically every part looks like it could be fabricated in machine shop.

Yeah, I think the death of grandma was turning point in the novel. Jeeze that book made me feel like I was right there with em on the journey.
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