Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help



Go Back   PeachParts Mercedes-Benz Forum > Mercedes-Benz Tech Information and Support > Vintage Mercedes Forum

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-06-2009, 07:15 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 5
1971 220/8 115 restoration

I've just successfully gotten a 1971 220/8 W115 back on the road. It had been sitting in my father-in-laws basement in SF for almost 10 years without being started, moved, etc. Incredibly, the atmospheric conditions there are something like the pyramids - no rust or corrosion, hardly any deterioration of anything. So I was starting with something very old, in great condition, but which had gotten no TLC for a decade. I've driven it about 50 miles now and everything seems to be cool.

I've got just two problems ranging from the potentially dangerous to the silly.

The fuel return hose that connects to the carburetor appears to have a different ID at each end, smaller at the carburetor and larger where it connects to the metal fuel line. (a) is that the case? and (b) is it a tricky item to get a hold of? Mine was leaking at both ends and I used the time-honored technique of clipping an inch or so from each end and reconnecting it. Its the weakest hose in the entire car so I know I have to replace it before it bursts and douses the engine with gas but finding it is proving a bit tricky.

And (this is just plain silly) the brake warning light is stuck on. The brakes are fine, brake fluid is fine, and the parking brake comes off fine. From what I can see, there are two fluid level sensors at the reservoir and some sort of switch at the parking brake. Maybe someone can save me some time: which is the most likely culprit from past experiences?

As this is my first dealings with a 115, are there any other items that are known weak areas that I should have a look at? Like I said, the condition of the car is unbelievable (see pictures on mercedes220.shutterfly.com).

Just for future restorers, this is all I did...
  1. Drained stale gas (disposed at hazmat site) & refilled with stabilized premium gas
  2. Flushed brake lines (brake fluid turned into molasses as expected)
  3. Replaced tires (old and mismatched brands)
  4. Replaced battery
  5. Removed plugs, squirted oil in each cylinder - turned engine by hand a few times, then cranked with starter.
  6. Installed new plugs (although the old ones looked fine)
  7. Sprayed Pierburg carburetor with cleaner (took top off, pulled float out)
And then I was stuck. It would crank, but not turn over.

The solution was fairly simple. I figured that the engine was in perfect condition but since it hadn't been started in forever, it was going to need to re-learn how to turn over. So the solution was chemical (juice the carb with starting fluid) and electrical (connect 2 batteries in parallel for longer cranking). That did it. After what seemed like a minute of cranking, she turned over and ran smoothly.

And, yes, you read correctly. I didn't change the oil or transmission fluid or power steering fluid or coolant. All of them looked perfectly clean (the pyramid effect) although now that the car is out of my father-in-laws basement and in my more convenient garage, I will be changing all of them. Seriously, this was like something out of a movie about a time warp.

Thanks, Joe
mercedes220.shutterfly.com


Last edited by hmbay; 02-10-2009 at 04:34 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-06-2009, 09:04 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 5,358
Disconnect the sensors from the master (hmmm, sounds like a "cult" edict). If this turns off the light then the floats are probably filled with fluid. You can either replace them or drain and reseal them using a chemical resistant epoxy.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-06-2009, 09:09 AM
Takernz_30's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Cebu City,Cebu,Philippines
Posts: 224
Change all old fuel hoses with OE style fabric lined fuel hose. In your #6, Did you turned the engine manually first before you start it? I did use fresh gasoline to start the engine for the first time after my engine was rebuilt.

I have '66 200 swapped my M121 with that engine you're having but it's a 2.0 not 2.2. Same horsepower as the M121 at 95.

Last edited by Takernz_30; 02-06-2009 at 09:26 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-06-2009, 12:34 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 5
Yes, I did turn the engine by hand first - changed the original post to reflect that.

I should have also mentioned that the car is on its second engine - another M115 which is why it has the Piersburg instead of the original Stromberg carburetor, and why almost all the hoses around the engine are newer (not the original OEM) EXCEPT for the fuel return hose which is in fact the only fabric sheathed hose under the hood. I was just worried that there was something special about the hose (perhaps explaining why it hadn't been replaced) because of having the different inside diameters at each end.

And thanks for the advice on the brake fluid level floats - that is the likely culprit - silly but annoying having the light on all the time.

Another silly problem is that I've got no instrument illumination - all the fuses are OK. Anything potentially insidious there, or do I just have a bunch of burned out light bulbs? Its funny because ALL of the exterior lights work - head lamps, turn signals, side markers, brake, etc - and the dome/courtesy lights work. Again, it's that same pyramid preservative effect of that basement.

Thanks, Joe
mercedes220.shutterfly.com

Last edited by hmbay; 02-06-2009 at 12:40 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-06-2009, 02:01 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 5,358
Twiddle the brightness rheostat a few hundred times. They tend to build corrosion and 95% of the time you can work it clean. You can also pull the gauge console and either clean the coils or jumper it.

For almost all of these problems there are already posts. Use the "search" function to save yourself some time.

Last edited by Mike D; 02-06-2009 at 02:06 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-06-2009, 05:51 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 5
Thanks - I'm hitting the search button more now. Rheostat lubed and twiddled is now working. And I had one full float in the brake fluid reservoir. Going out to get the new hoses and I'll be ready for the next challenge.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02-06-2009, 06:07 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 5,358
The beauty of these old cars is that almost everything is re-buildable. 90% of the time simply taking the thing apart, cleaning and re-lubing it fixes it. Ya just gotta love THAT!

O fcourse, by the time we get these cars 90% of everything on it NEEDS to be!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 02-06-2009, 10:49 PM
Takernz_30's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Cebu City,Cebu,Philippines
Posts: 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmbay View Post
I should have also mentioned that the car is on its second engine - another M115 which is why it has the Piersburg instead of the original Stromberg carburetor, and why almost all the hoses around the engine are newer (not the original OEM) EXCEPT for the fuel return hose which is in fact the only fabric sheathed hose under the hood. I was just worried that there was something special about the hose (perhaps explaining why it hadn't been replaced) because of having the different inside diameters at each end.
Yes there are some hoses that are different diameters at each end and I've seen it, but here in the Philippines it is much harder to find. Pierburg and Stromberg are the same carbuetors and they are manufactured respectively just like BOSCH and HELLA.

As you said that your engine runs smoothly when fired up for first time, fuel varnish and gum deposits would clogged the jets and they stick to the needles from storage for a decade. As a preventive move, consider pouring fuel treatment in your fuel tank if you hate cracking open your Pierburg carb. This will clean your carb from inside and they free needles and jets from fuel varnish and gum.

oh yeah, If you plan to your car as a daily driver, change all the fluids, coolant, engine oil, ATF and filter in your automatic gearbox, ATF in your carb, diff. oil, greased the prop. shafts.

Go enjoy driving your old mercedes,
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02-07-2009, 05:20 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 5
At the local car parts store in our small town, we found a fuel line that was in between the sizes at each end and since it's the low-pressure return line, it clamped OK. It is really a different ID at each end though.

Yeah, the Pierburg is a licensed copy of the Stromberg 175CD - same operating principles. I did take the top off, took the main float and gaskets out, and sprayed it all over with carb cleaner - but it really didn't have any gum or varnish to speak of. Like I said, the storage conditions were almost ideal.

I fixed all the problems mentioned in the thread today, including a burned out bulb in the shift lever console, and started changing fluids - did the antifreeze today. It's not going to be a daily driver, but I want it to be safe and sane.

And I turned on the air conditioner today and it worked... talk about lucky!

And, yes, I'm old enough to have driven cars older than this one - there is such a different feel with an (almost) completely mechanical drive train, and it is refreshing to be able to just take stuff apart and fix it as opposed to having to throw parts away because its electronic bits have gotten fried. I fixed five or six things just in a short afternoon - I don't think you can do that with anything built in the last 10 years. For one, there is no access under the hood - so you have to remove half a dozen unrelated parts to get to what you need to fix. And then when you get to it, 9 out of 10 times it isn't something you can fix.

My wife, unfortunately, feels that the 220 crowds her Acura TSX in the garage, and was arguing that it should be returned to her father's basement for storage. How's the forum for marriage counseling?

Last edited by hmbay; 02-07-2009 at 05:41 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02-07-2009, 07:57 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 5,358
I agree with your wife. The Acura should be stored in the basement.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 02-09-2009, 01:54 PM
250 Coupe's Avatar
Middle Aged Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Des Moines, WA
Posts: 927
Don't forget the fabric covered hoses at the fuel tank. I got my '76 280C safe and sound only to discover that fuel was running out onto the ground due the hoses breaking just as I pulled into the driveway.

Michael
__________________
Usta haves '69 250/8, '76 280C, 1971 250C 114.023, 1976 450SEL 116.033
Current have, 1983 300SD 126.120
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 02-10-2009, 03:06 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 5
Vendor for Steel Braided Brake Hoses for 220/8 115?

Right now I've got no leaks and I've gone over all the hoses for cracks, abrasion, etc. The car got overhauled when it got the second engine which explains why most of the original hoses (particularly the fabric covered ones) have been replaced (they probably just cut the old engine hoses out and spooled new ones in). And the basement conditions preserved things pretty well (which also explains why my only corrosion has been in the dash light dimmer). That weird fuel return hose was probably one of the only original ones left on the car.

My wife's uncle did recommend installing steel braided brake hoses at the wheels as he'd seen embolisms occur with high brake pressure on his old MG, although its not as catastrophic with dual brake circuits. There was a link to a company that specialized in doing them for MB but they seem to have gone out of business. I've searched the forums but haven't found any alternate vendors. Anyone have a favorite vendor that supplies steel braided hoses compatible with the 115 220/8?

On a positive note I filled the tank with 11 gallons of Chevron premium today and the dilution of the older stabilized gas with nice fresh gas was like an injection of happy juice into the engine and it absolutely purred down Highway 1 (up here its the Cabrillo Highway, not the PCH) and hit an astonishing 70mph. The car accelerated much better with no pinging, no knocking and no dreaded after-run when I switched it off (the bain of early smog control systems).

Thanks, Joe
mercedes220.shutterfly.com

Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:18 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2018 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Peach Parts or Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page