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  #1  
Old 04-01-2013, 02:59 AM
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Location: PDX->OR->USA
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Can't read manual

I just ordered a manual from the Classic Center but the US branch was out so they ordered it from Germany. Because it is the original German text the whole thing is written in metric, does anybody read European? Thanks!
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1962 220SE W111 Coupe, 2nd owner

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  #2  
Old 04-01-2013, 10:12 AM
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It is just like English, spoken with a rock in your mouth and fewer spaces between words.



You'll find your German parts vocab going up exponentially after studying it for a while. I had German manuals for an old 911 and Karmann Ghia and the language wasn't a barrier after a while. Now there's google translate too, making things a little easier.

Sure beats my British manual, written in Whitworth, for all that's worth!
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Looking for Early 108 windshield surround wood in decent-to-good condition.
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  #3  
Old 04-01-2013, 04:05 PM
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It appears this April Fools joke wasn't as successful as those I posted on other forums today. I thought adding a touch of American-style international ignorance by calling the language "European" would really help sell it. I did it as a goof, A GOOF! (Anyone else see "The Ten"?)
A few years ago I told my friends that I had switched to metric units for everything since it's far more efficient and I'd ask them to make plans with me using "metric 10-hours-in-a-day" time rather than the "English 24-hour cycle."

You're right about the English manuals tho, I still find myself prising on the propshaft, or adjusting the quarterlight above the wing.

Here's my posts on other forums today:
I started the wagon conversion... problems - Benzworld.org - Mercedes-Benz Discussion Forum

What happens in Vegas should have stayed in Vegas
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1962 220SE W111 Coupe, 2nd owner

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3.../SideSmall.jpg

The Coupe Group (W111/112 coupes and cabs) official website
The Coupe Group on Facebook
MotoArigato: Roadworthy News & Humor
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  #4  
Old 04-01-2013, 05:02 PM
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Ya never know, especially on BW, where some folks can't read a Manuel to tie their choose.
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Looking for Early 108 windshield surround wood in decent-to-good condition.
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  #5  
Old 04-02-2013, 12:12 PM
Pooka
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
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As far as factory manuals go.....

Even the factory manuals can be a bit hard to grasp at times. I was helping a friend with his 600 and even with the factory manual from 1970 it was tough to figure out some of the stuff they were trying to get across.

I chalked this up to just how many original 600 owners did their own work and also that Mercedes Techs received additional training before they could service a 600. Therefore for them the manual was just a reminder of what they learned in school.

By the way... The key to servicing a 600 is to just think of it as a big 108 with a few weird options. Once you get past the thought of everything costing a fortune to replace if you break it it is just like working on anything else except for a lot less room in the engine compartment.
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  #6  
Old 04-02-2013, 04:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pooka View Post

By the way... The key to servicing a 600 is to just think of it as a big 108 with a few weird options. Once you get past the thought of everything costing a fortune to replace if you break it it is just like working on anything else except for a lot less room in the engine compartment.
I found just the car for you! Beverly Hills Car Club :: 1973 Mercedes-Benz 600 -

Just in case you're done enjoying life, and having disposable income, and friends, family, sanity, those trivial things.
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1962 220SE W111 Coupe, 2nd owner

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3.../SideSmall.jpg

The Coupe Group (W111/112 coupes and cabs) official website
The Coupe Group on Facebook
MotoArigato: Roadworthy News & Humor
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  #7  
Old 04-02-2013, 05:03 PM
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Dang! All I did was LOOK at those photos and my bank account shrunk by half! Yup, that one'd take care of any of that there "disposable income" lying about.
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  #8  
Old 04-02-2013, 11:41 PM
Pooka
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 664
Actually this is not too far gone. The paint job alone is worth the asking price. The fact that the engine and transmission is still there is also a big plus.

But it would be a project for sure. And that is what this appears to be; someone's project that stalled out. Somewhere the headlights and taillights are sitting around, and hopefully the original seat springs. It is easy to see where some 108 seat portions were used.

The real expensive part of this, besides the hydraulics, would be replacing all the wood that is missing from the dash and from around the windows. The exhaust system would not be cheap, and it appears to be riding on a set of original shocks. On the plus side the one air bag I can see looks like it is in good shape, and all the air system looks to be there.

I think the last quote I saw on having the total hydraulics rebuilt was around $15,000, but except for the labor involved none of the hydraulic system is hard to repair or even that expensive if all you need are O-rings.

Of course, it has to run. The last quote I saw on a new factory crankshaft was $18,000.
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  #9  
Old 04-03-2013, 09:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pooka View Post
Actually this is not too far gone. The paint job alone is worth the asking price.
I always worry when I see a car like this that it was painted to look good simply to sell the "project car" at a higher price since you never know what's under there. If I was restoring this car to full spec I would go ahead and strip it down again to see what's lurking, not cheap but better than the new owner coming after you when a chunk of bondo pops out over a speed bump during his annual Ascension to the Throne parade. You don't want to be on the $hit list of an African dictator.

I've heard Karl Middelhauve suggest that the hydraulic pressure in these lines would cut a hole right through you if it got a pinhole puncture, true?
Also read about the "quick up" switch position would break your arm if you had it hanging out.
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1962 220SE W111 Coupe, 2nd owner

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3.../SideSmall.jpg

The Coupe Group (W111/112 coupes and cabs) official website
The Coupe Group on Facebook
MotoArigato: Roadworthy News & Humor
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 04-03-2013, 10:18 PM
Pooka
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 664
I don't know the working pressure of this system; it would vary with the rpm of the engine.

But high pressure will equal higher speeds of operation, and the smaller the lines the higher the pressure they can take. What Karl said about the dangers of a pinhole would hold true for any other high pressure hydraulic system, so I cannot see why it would not be true for this one.

Leaks in such a system are normally found at the joints or attachment to a valve, so the spray is usually a fine mist. But if you are in an accident and a line is torn.......

And since this system has a rather large accumulator it would continue to leak for a time after the engine was turned off.

As far as the new paint goes.... When I run across something like this I look inside the doors for rust. If it is present there it is just a matter of time before it is present on the outside as well no matter how good the paint job.
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