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  #1  
Old 08-26-2013, 07:41 PM
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brake shoe size 1960 190b

Hi folks. I got my 1960 190b late last year. Always seemed that the car pulled to the left when brakes are applied. Just today I noticed that the front brake shoes are different left and right.

Left side shoes are just slightly one inch longer than the right side shoes. Car has new hoses, lines, m/c, and shoe linings are equally worn (still about 1/4" inch). Brakes release completely when pedal is released.

Regardless of model of car with standard, non-power drum brakes, wouldn't this difference cause a permanent imbalance? When brakes are applied, the left front wheel always pulls to the left. Hard braking, and the left tries to veer to the left.

Seems that's like trying to push two ten-pound weights with your left hand, and one ten-pound weight with your right hand. There's more friction surface on the left side.

Your thoughts are appreciated!
Thanks.
Tom

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Old 08-26-2013, 10:22 PM
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You answered your own question.

Replace the shoes.
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Old 08-26-2013, 10:25 PM
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Go to the shoe store and they will give you the correct size.
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Old 08-26-2013, 11:02 PM
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Order up a new set of brakes and replace all four shoes. It is the only way to be sure you have the right ones on there.

A flat rate book from that era says the job takes 2.6 hours. I guess it could if you go really slow.
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Old 08-27-2013, 06:52 AM
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Thanks for the ideas. Of course, the issue is that the shoes for this car are no longer available. I was just trying to confirm the theory that the longer shoes on one wheel cause brake imbalance. If that's confirmed, then grinding the longer brake lining to match the shorter should prevent imbalance.

Thanks.
Tom
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  #6  
Old 08-28-2013, 09:50 PM
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A partially collapsed brake hose does the same thing. Get new hoses.
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Old 08-28-2013, 09:57 PM
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oops, you already have new.
I would then measure the internal drum lining. The shorter distance across centers will grab first.

Are the shoes adjustable ?

One cylinder might have air in it, bleed it with no pressure on it.
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Old 08-29-2013, 12:48 PM
Pooka
 
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In theory the distance of the shoes from the drums should make no difference. (I actually had this pointed out to me about 50 years ago. It was then that I understood the meaning of 'Those that can't do teach'.)

Yeah, that's theory. The reality is if the brakes are out of adjustment you will get this problem even with 'self-adjusting' brakes.

You might try looking in Hemming Motor News for someone that offers the service of brake relining. As long as the steel shoes are still good they can be relined. This was once, back in the 1930's and 40's, a rather standard thing. Buying brakes shoes that fit your car right off the shelf was possible only if you drove a Ford or Chevy.

After relining all four shoes would be the 'correct' length and, after adjusting, should stop the car nicely.

And if the drums are too thin to turn then you could at least have them checked for roundness. One only has to be a little oval to cause a pull.

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