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  #1  
Old 08-11-2015, 01:31 PM
n10 n10 is offline
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W108 pees green

Hello All,

So I have developed a coolant leak under the thermostat housing and I cant get to it.
I have an AC pump sitting there in the way. The pump is not connected to any hoses nor is there even a belt to it, useless and unused.

Is it possible to remove the pump and bracket easily? Are there any hidden oil or coolant lines from the engine to the pump?

Thanks!
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1969 w108 280s

Last edited by n10; 08-11-2015 at 03:09 PM.
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Old 08-11-2015, 02:28 PM
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Easily? No but it is do-able. Takes a bit of finagling and a fair amount of cursing. Mostly of the, "Who the #@!* designed this Mickey Mouse set-up" and the "WTF was I thinking when I decided to do this" variety.

One of the A/C mounting bolts passes THROUGH the water pump. You'd need to replace the bolt with a shorter one. Depending on who made the mount bracket you might need to remove the alternator and swivel bracket.

While you have it apart, replace ALL the hoses, including the short by-pass. Don't be surprised if the thermostat/ lower hose connection has corroded away. Pretty common.
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Old 08-11-2015, 03:07 PM
n10 n10 is offline
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Oh great, cant wait for that!

Yeah I think that is what is leaking, the lower thermostat hose


If I kept the bracket on, would I be ok with leaving the long bolt that goes through the waterpump?
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Old 08-11-2015, 04:10 PM
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You would only be using a shorter bolt if you decided to not re-install the A/C mount bracket. 99.44% of the time you will be replacing the long bolt due to corrosion anyway.

Keep your tap set, rust buster, degreaser and wire brush handy. You'll be using them.

You can get a foot of the good Gates/Dayco heavy duty hose at about any auto parts store, even at AutoZoo or CSK Auto. You have to ask for it by size. Ignore the usual "What model and year" question and tell them the I.D..

Use the good clamps which have the metal band which completely encircle the hose. This is NOT a job you want to repeat.

I'd suggest using the short water pump bolt and checking the system before you replace the bracket.

Never-seize and Teflon tape on the long bolt for the final install.
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Old 08-11-2015, 04:18 PM
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Oh yeah. Since the A/C is inoperative and there is no freon in the system it is MUCH easier to remove the condenser and radiator. Gives you a good straight shot at the front of the engine.

The radiator fins make excellent "knuckle graters".
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Old 08-11-2015, 08:39 PM
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Iv'e been there and done this.

Removing the radiator and condenser might seem like an excessive thing to do in order to repair this leak it really is not. Once you can reach through and see what you are dealing with it is not such a terrible job. And pulling radiator is about a one minute job; maybe two.

And while you are looking at this head on then check the timing chain casting for leaks on the sides of the casting. I have seen the castings wear though and allow pinhole leaks of oil to come out and it drives you crazy trying to find it. After all, who thinks of their casting having a hole in it when you are looking for an oil leak?

But if you do find such a leak a bit of JB Weld will patch it right up.
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Old 08-11-2015, 10:54 PM
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Yeah, I agree with everything above. The bracket for the York compressor is stupid. Going through the water pump is really lame.
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Old 08-11-2015, 11:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Idle View Post
"check the timing chain casting for leaks on the sides of the casting. I have seen the castings wear though"
timing chain casting, aka, the cylinder block.
The M130 timing chain cavity is integrally cast in the iron block.
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Old 08-12-2015, 11:57 AM
n10 n10 is offline
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Thanks for the pointers guys!
Do I have to remove the rad or is it possible to work around?

I will report back if I find anything interesting
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Old 08-12-2015, 01:14 PM
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It's your car and time. Do it however you want.
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Old 08-12-2015, 08:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Reiner View Post
timing chain casting, aka, the cylinder block.
The M130 timing chain cavity is integrally cast in the iron block.
OK, then check the block.

It will be easy to spot if there is a problem. There will be a thick streak of oil seeming to come out of nowhere, but that nowhere is a hole where the timing chain has rubbed through.
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