Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help




Go Back   PeachParts Mercedes-Benz Forum > Mercedes-Benz Tech Information and Support > Vintage Mercedes Forum

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-09-2019, 02:51 PM
"One with my 71"
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: In a house
Posts: 1,109
250 sedan Headliner repair DIY?

Hello folks. Attached a picture of my headliner that has pulled away from the rear top window area. The rest of the liner is in immaculate shape (approaching 50 years old... I can't believe it myself)

The leather is supple.. not rigid. I can't see removing it just because of this. Before I attempt a professional repair ($$$... want to avoid that if possible) I am interested if anyone has repaired this themselves, what worked.

The only thing I can come up with is sewing a thin piano wire along the edge, then using that to stretch the entire length back into place, tucking the wire under the edging. (The wire should prevent any tearing).

One area around the corner is torn but should be easily repaired.

Tell me what you think!


---
Attached Thumbnails
250 sedan Headliner repair DIY?-headliner.jpg  
__________________
One day the greater consciousness of humanity will ask of itself... "How many Einsteins and savants did we destroy to satisfy the wants of women in their lawful genocide upon the unborn?"
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-09-2019, 02:57 PM
Stretch's Avatar
...like a shield of steel
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Somewhere in the Netherlands
Posts: 14,453
I've seen people using special non colouring fabric glue and repair patches under damage to make headliners good.

How does it fit at that end of the car? On a W123 there's a whole panel at the front and the rear section gets tucked into the window rubber - is the front on a W114 tucked into the rubber?
__________________
1992 W201 190E 1.8 171,000 km - Daily driver
1981 W123 300D ~ 100,000 miles / 160,000 km - project car stripped to the bone
1965 Land Rover Series 2a Station Wagon CIS recovery therapy!
1961 Volvo PV544 Bare metal rat rod-ish thing

I'm here to chat about cars and to help others - I'm not here "to always be right" like an internet warrior



Don't leave that there - I'll take it to bits!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-09-2019, 03:44 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 4,502
The only way I've seen it done properly is to remove the wind screen and gasket. The headliner is then glued to the metal using a contact cement and the windscreen/gasket assembly is replaced.

This is using the U.S.D.O.T. type of windscreen which is different from the rest of the world.

You MIGHT get away with working the liner back using the European style gasket but I've never had any luck trying to do it without removal of the windscreen gasket in a U.S. model.

Good luck and I hope it works for you.
__________________
“Whatever story you're telling, it will be more interesting if, at the end you add, "and then everything burst into flames.”
― Brian P. Cleary, You Oughta Know By Now
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-09-2019, 03:54 PM
"One with my 71"
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: In a house
Posts: 1,109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stretch View Post
I've seen people using special non colouring fabric glue and repair patches under damage to make headliners good.

How does it fit at that end of the car? On a W123 there's a whole panel at the front and the rear section gets tucked into the window rubber - is the front on a W114 tucked into the rubber?
Here is a better picture taken directly beneath. It goes under the rubber window seal... which is odd to me since that becomes an issue if the window needs replaced... but you can see the sides are still intact (the second picture shows that)



-----
Attached Thumbnails
250 sedan Headliner repair DIY?-screen-shot-2019-05-09-12.49.43-pm.jpg   250 sedan Headliner repair DIY?-screen-shot-2019-05-09-12.52.05-pm.png  
__________________
One day the greater consciousness of humanity will ask of itself... "How many Einsteins and savants did we destroy to satisfy the wants of women in their lawful genocide upon the unborn?"
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-09-2019, 03:58 PM
"One with my 71"
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: In a house
Posts: 1,109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike D View Post
The only way I've seen it done properly is to remove the wind screen and gasket. The headliner is then glued to the metal using a contact cement and the windscreen/gasket assembly is replaced.

This is using the U.S.D.O.T. type of windscreen which is different from the rest of the world.



Good luck and I hope it works for you.


BINGO!!!!! Thanks for connecting my brain cells... the obvious thing to do escaped me! I'll make it a 2fer... and just replace the seal as well (it isn't that bad... slight weathering cracks... but hey, why not do them both at the same time)



__________________
One day the greater consciousness of humanity will ask of itself... "How many Einsteins and savants did we destroy to satisfy the wants of women in their lawful genocide upon the unborn?"
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-20-2019, 03:34 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Phoenix Arizona. Ex Durban R.S.A.
Posts: 3,582
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike D View Post
This is using the U.S.D.O.T. type of windscreen which is different from the rest of the world.
How so? I've seen no difference between the windscreens on Benz's from my native South Africa and US ones.

- Peter.
__________________
81 240D stick. 316000 miles at purchase. 342000 now
2000 GMC Sonoma
Formerly...
2002 Kia Rio. Worst crap on four wheels
1981 240D 4spd stick. 389000 miles. Deceased Jan 08
1984 123 200
1979 116 280S
1972 Cadillac Sedan DeVille
1971 108 280S
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-20-2019, 04:29 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 4,502
Starting in the '60's the NHTSA mandated the use of laminated glass versus the tempered glass used by the rest of the world. This required a different gasket due to the additional thickness of the glass. I don't know when/if the rest of the world went to laminated glass.
__________________
“Whatever story you're telling, it will be more interesting if, at the end you add, "and then everything burst into flames.”
― Brian P. Cleary, You Oughta Know By Now
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-24-2019, 10:06 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Phoenix Arizona. Ex Durban R.S.A.
Posts: 3,582
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike D View Post
Starting in the '60's the NHTSA mandated the use of laminated glass versus the tempered glass used by the rest of the world. This required a different gasket due to the additional thickness of the glass. I don't know when/if the rest of the world went to laminated glass.
Ah I see. I suspect that Mercedes pretty soon started using laminated glass everywhere as I've never seen or heard of one without. Except I guess from cars of the 50's and older. Would have been too much hassle on the line to use two gaskets and glasses for different markets, not to mention the laminated glass would have been better from a safety perspective which Mercedes were all big on.

- Peter.
__________________
81 240D stick. 316000 miles at purchase. 342000 now
2000 GMC Sonoma
Formerly...
2002 Kia Rio. Worst crap on four wheels
1981 240D 4spd stick. 389000 miles. Deceased Jan 08
1984 123 200
1979 116 280S
1972 Cadillac Sedan DeVille
1971 108 280S
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:35 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2018 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Peach Parts or Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page