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  #1  
Old 07-13-2004, 04:35 AM
W108 Goddess
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: San Diego
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Talking Stupid Girl Wants To Change Oil on W108

Hey all! Yes the dumb girl I'm referring to is myself. I am tired of taking my W108 in to get oil changes and would like to do it myself. I can do the oil change on my bmw in about 30 min and was wondering exactly what is involved in the 250SE? I have heard that these cars use some sort of a hex bit on the drain plug? I have also heard that the oil comes out really fast, as in most of it within a minute or two? Anybody have any tricks to doing this? I don't wanna make a mess or get stuck on something. She is due for her change in about 400 miles. Thanks!

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  #2  
Old 07-13-2004, 10:06 AM
Diesel on the brain
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Upstate Virginia
Posts: 566
You should do a search here for "Topsider" - it's a pump that allows you to suck the oil out through the dipstick. If the filter on that engine is up top you won't even have to lay down in the dirt. I was spoiled by oil changes in SUVs, and didn't have a place to store ramps, so I bought a topsider (for less than the cost of one oil change at *any* indy place around me), and now I use it not just for the MB, but for the other vehicles in the fleet too. Pump it 30 times, stick the hose in the dipstick tube, and go open a cool beverage.

Not that my wife has any more interest in changing her oil now, but at least I can do it.

Let me tell you though, the best use is for the transmission in my Trooper. Rather than dropping the pan every 30k miles, I just suck the fluid out. (Dropping the pan on that year Trooper requres removing 3 skid plates, and part of the exhaust system).

-Tad

P.S. it is metal, and holds 8 quarts so it should handle all that you will throw at it on a MB.
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  #3  
Old 07-13-2004, 10:44 AM
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Location: Alexandria, Virginia
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First you need get under and see what type of drain plug you have and how much interference you have from other parts of your car's frame and crossmember. My '60 Fintail has a bolt-head drain plug - very easy to reach with a regular 19 MM box-end wrench. My pair of W114 '72 250s (250 sedan & 250 coupe) have the same drain hole but the coupe has the bolt type plug while the sedan needs a 14 MM hex-bit (like a large allen wrench) Both 250 drains are close to the subframe crossmember. I can get a wrench on the coupe but a regular allen wrench won't fit on the sedan so I had to get the special allen wrench from Mercedes.

Yes, it's a large drain hole. You need to figure the least messy option - deep/wide drain pan, a piece of cardboard to catch oil spatters, etc - whatever works for you. It's really not that big a deal once you've done it the first time.

The oil filter is a canister type with a replaceable filter cartridge inside, not a spin-on like most modern cars. It's down low on the rear drivers side of the engine block so you'll need to get under there to catch the drips while you change it. You unbolt the canister from the filter mount and remove the filter cartidge. Make sure the 2 small rubber seals are there - one on the filter mount and one on the bottom of the canister. Make sure you get a new sealing 'O' ring for the canister rim (those usually come with the new filter cartridge but occasionally not!) There should also be a metal sealing washer where the long bolt goes through the canister.

Import parts stores should have an OE type MANN or Knecht filter carteridge, otherwise Fram and Purolator make replacements but not all autoparts stores may have them in stock. Make sure the small rubber seals, 'O' ring and sealing washer are in place when you reassemble the filter cartridge and canister.

Happy Motoring, Mark
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Last edited by Mark DiSilvestro; 07-13-2004 at 10:58 AM.
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  #4  
Old 07-13-2004, 12:02 PM
Jim B+
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You GO girl! Actually the whole idea of the "Topsider" never

made much sense to me until I thought about the problems you can encounter with odd drain plugs on old cars, and the danger of stripping the heads/threads or otherwise creating a problem during normal maintenance. Is there concern that the "Topsider" may leave sludge in the crankcase that a conventional drain-and-fill would purge?

You are to be commended for your enterprise and concern for your car(s). Good luck!
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  #5  
Old 07-13-2004, 12:15 PM
Diesel on the brain
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Upstate Virginia
Posts: 566
There is the concern, but have you ever checked to see if there is a lip inside of the factory drain plug? I know some vehicles have a lip in there.

It's also a joy in the winter (although it is a bit slower). I can put on a pair of gloves and not worry about getting my clothes wet, and I keep warm.

Just be sure to wipe the hose as it comes out with a paper towel.

-Tad
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  #6  
Old 07-13-2004, 01:07 PM
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You still need to get under to change the oil filters on these vintage Benzes. No 'topsider' for oil filters. When I change oil in winter, I wait for a dry day. It's unlikely you'll strip the large drain plug threads, though I've seen where 'mechanics', without the proper tool, used channellocks or visegrip pliers to chew up the allen plugs.

Happy Motoring, Mark
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  #7  
Old 07-13-2004, 01:36 PM
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If you can handle your BMW's oil, you can do this. Get a 14mm allen key from your local tool emporium. These might take some calling around to locate. Take a quick spin around to warm up the engine. Park it, and unscrew the plug on the oil pan. Drain oil, re-install plug w/ copper crush washer (which should be included w/ MB filter kit). You're done underneath.

Locate filter housing on right side of engine. Loosen large bolt and allow oil to drain. After a minute or so, remove bolt and filter housing. Pull old filter and examine the bottom of the canister for a small rubber washer. That's important to ensure proper oil flow through the filter. Put in new filter, swap out o-ring at the lip of filter housing. Another hose-like rubber fitting should be between the top of the filter and the filter mount. Reassemble and reinstall large bolt. Here's a link of the whole filter assembly for 113 vehicles, which is a very similar design.

Add six quarts of your preferred oil and start motor, keeping an eye on oil pressure gauge. Check for leaks and you're in business. Good luck and I'm sure others will have additional ideas.

Last edited by JMela; 07-13-2004 at 02:04 PM.
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  #8  
Old 07-13-2004, 04:39 PM
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gimme a low-tech 240D
 
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Location: central ky
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250SE, there just arent enough girls to go around who want to work on cars. You are answer to everyman's prayer for companionship.

When you come back - please attach pics (of the car not you). For a woman who likes working on vintage cars, nobody cares whether or not she's got bucked teeth, big ears and a nose that reaches to her chin...... Am glad to meet you and happy to know that girls like you exist on this planet.

BTW, here's a product that replaces the stock drain plug with flip valve that's incredibly convenient for oil changes: http://www.fumotovalve.com/ Their online catalogue may not go back far enough to include the 108, but that doesnt mean they dont have it.
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Stupid Girl Wants To Change Oil on W108-fumoto-oil-valve.jpg  

Last edited by 300SDog; 07-13-2004 at 04:45 PM.
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  #9  
Old 07-13-2004, 05:49 PM
PaulC
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Just don't forget to close it before driving.
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  #10  
Old 07-13-2004, 06:33 PM
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Hey Mark,

my 72 250 has a 15mm hex. Haven't found one yet.
I am guilty of pipe wrench use but it's quick!

What you guys said is exactly right. and Don't forget that little brass washer on the filter bolt!

You go girl.
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  #11  
Old 07-13-2004, 07:17 PM
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Location: Northern Calif. (Fairfield Area)
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Karate Girl,
What is reason for changing own oil? Is it for economics or for self fulfillment? If for the latter I will help, grasshopper. Mark has given you excellent advice. Pay very close attention to seals as he suggests. If you have a question, ask. I can only add a couple of comments. I would not use any suction devices on the M108 engine, because it wasn't designed fot it. The newer models have a dipstick tube that goes to the very bottom of the pan, and yours doesn't. Also I highly recommend that once you start the car after the oil change that you stick your head under the car and look for a massive oil leak. If you see one, shut the engine off immediately, and reseat the filter housing. Seating the housing properly can be tricky, but you will learn. My very first MB was a 68 250S just before I went to work for Mercedes. I loved that car, but, oh well, that was several hundred MBs ago. I commend you on seeking new challenges if your heart is in the right place. Many years ago I found myself divorced and didn't know how to feed myself. I had eaten as many salads as an illerate man has eaten hamburgers. I decided I needed to learn how to cook. So with the help of my mom, my x wife, cookbooks, tv, and the internet, I'm a pretty darn good cook. I cook many styles and regions. What I'm trying to say is, if you are sincere, people here will help you master the 108.

Peter
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  #12  
Old 07-13-2004, 09:24 PM
W108 Goddess
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: San Diego
Posts: 108
Thanks for all the help. And to answer some questions, I'm not wanting to change my oil to save money. It only costs $20 anyway. If only you guys knew how much I spend on modifying the E36 you'd know. I do basically everything to the bmw myself and have never really given much effort into working on the mercedes. I would like to learn, and I'm sure that car is pertty straight forward to work on with no computers to interfere. :p
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  #13  
Old 07-13-2004, 11:30 PM
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just a guy
 
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Chheeeeez...

Sounds like we're all a bit smitten here OK, OK, me too. Good luck, it will actually be a piece of cake for you since you know which end of a wrench to hold. And, peter (autozen) I LOVE your occidental technique--LOL.
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  #14  
Old 07-14-2004, 12:32 AM
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250SE,
For the most part, the W108, like my Fintail, is relatively easy to work on, though with such old-tech features as point distributor ignition and kingpin front suspension. The suspension has metal bushings instead of the rubber and balljoints used in modern cars. There's at least 14 grease fittings on that front end that need periodic greasing. Perhaps 3 more on the driveshaft and 2 at the rear swing-axle pivot. Without knowing how long you've owned this car or what service records you have for it, some other things to keep an eye on are the rubber brake hoses. Even if they look OK, as they age they can deteriorate internally and plug up, eventually causing one or more of the brakes to seize, pull and overheat. If you plan on doing your own heavy maintenance & repairs, I strongly recommend finding a factory Mercedes repair manual, perhaps through online bookdealers or Ebay. They're also availible on computer CD but I've heard mixed opinions on those. I'd certainly want a good manual handy before attempting any repair to the mechanical fuel injection.

Happy Motoring, Mark
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  #15  
Old 07-14-2004, 01:03 AM
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I don't know about a 250SE but my 108 has an oil cooler. That holds at least another quart of dirty oil that you'd want to drain out of there on an oil change.

There is no O ring that I know of on the cooler bolt. Also, while you're at it, check the oil cooler hoses (if existant) and see how crusty they look. I had a close call with the 300D. The oil cooler hose finally gave out after 20 some years and developed a leak while I was driving!!! Fortunately I didn't have that much further to go and noticed a puddle under the car before I was to head out again.

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