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  #16  
Old 06-26-2016, 07:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Coasttocoast View Post
Today I replaced the factory engine driven clutch/fan with an electric fan. I ordered a Spal VA18-AP10/C-41S from Summit, a 16" low profile puller.

A consideration on fan location. If the fan is too close to the rad, the center of the fan won't move air through the rad because the air if blocked be the motor.

I had a situation with a rotary screw air compressor overheat due to a marginal cooler and the fan was too close. Spacing the fan out a few inches solved the problem.
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  #17  
Old 06-27-2016, 12:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 97 SL320 View Post
A consideration on fan location. If the fan is too close to the rad, the center of the fan won't move air through the rad because the air if blocked be the motor.

I had a situation with a rotary screw air compressor overheat due to a marginal cooler and the fan was too close. Spacing the fan out a few inches solved the problem.
Thanks for your comments.

Yes, in a perfect world I should have a full shroud with the fan a couple inches away so it can pull through the entire radiator. Depending on how much room after the swap I will customize a shroud.

I took the car for an hour drive, some highway, some stop and go traffic, and with the A/C running. Temps were running lower than before, and I had no issues. The engine does run a little smoother and idles a few rpm's higher in gear sitting at a light. So a worthwhile change.

But tonight after a last drive, it's home in the garage for a transplant.
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  #18  
Old 06-28-2016, 01:40 AM
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Start of engine removal

This afternoon I put the car on jack stands. As I will need to weld in motor and transmission mounts I made sure the car was level, side to side and front to back. I have the car just high enough to creep under, but not too high that it's hard to reach under the hood. I hope high enough to pull the engine and trans together. Last pic of the complete engine compartment.

'69 230 build w/LQ4 swap-image.jpeg
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  #19  
Old 06-28-2016, 01:50 AM
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I'm going to make every effort to have an uncluttered engine bay. Battery into the trunk, new chassis wiring with new fuse box under the dash, and patching/filling all the holes etc before new paint. Here is a pic after 2 1/2 hours today.

'69 230 build w/LQ4 swap-image.jpeg
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  #20  
Old 06-28-2016, 09:59 AM
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Why go through the trouble of moving the fuse block? It's in a pretty convenient position where it is. 95% of the wiring mess will be removed once you get rid of all the old ignition wiring anyway.

You'd be surprised at how many relays and how much "extra" wiring there is for the M130 engines. Cold start idle, choke heater relays, temperature timing relays, A/C idle just to name a few. Redundancy was the name of the game for the Daimler crew. Instead of trying to adapt things for multiple purposes the engineers would add a circuit.
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  #21  
Old 06-29-2016, 12:30 AM
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Mike, thanks for your comments.

Basically the extra effort is required. As this car is now 47 years old the wiring needs replaced. I realize the wiring could last another few years, but since the wiring harness is so simple it is going to be easier to start with a clean slate. I will be replacing the A/C- Heating system, and changing out all of the lighting to LED bulbs, and with the new engine it will be nicer to have a new fuse box that matches the cars new electric demands.

Ran to O'Reilly Auto Parts and picked up a new engine hoist. With the upcoming 3-day weekend coming up I should be able to get the engine out and make some progress getting the bar cleaned up.
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  #22  
Old 06-29-2016, 08:35 PM
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Interested to know how much room is left in that engine bay. As cheap as those engines are, you can turbo one & not feel too bad if you explode it...
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  #23  
Old 06-29-2016, 10:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Coasttocoast View Post

Yes, in a perfect world I should have a full shroud with the fan a couple inches away so it can pull through the entire radiator. Depending on how much room after the swap I will customize a shroud.

Some shrouds use thin rubber flaps in the non fan area that close to allow the fan to pull air but open at highway speeds to allow more air flow.
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  #24  
Old 06-30-2016, 02:01 AM
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Interested to know how much room is left in that engine bay. As cheap as those engines are, you can turbo one & not feel too bad if you explode it...
Thanks for reading my thread.

I'm anxious/interested myself on the room in the engine bay! Spent another 2 1/2 hours this afternoon getting the engine loose. Quick measurements show conflict with the exhaust and steering box and the drivers side head with the vacuum booster. I'll probably go to hydroboost to solve the booster conflict and need to get the engine set in place to see what header might solve the steering box conflict.

'69 230 build w/LQ4 swap-image.jpeg

I guess cheap is a relative term. Although you can buy a new block for under $500 and a used short block for about the same, it's all the other items that make up the real cost. But turbo? With a cam, head work, tune and exhaust it's easy to get over 400 HP to the wheels. With minimal boost and no change to the internals your over 600HP.

Many performance guys specifically buy the LQ4 as they are already boost friendly. Dished piston with 9.4:1 compression and heads that flow the same as the LS3 head.
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  #25  
Old 06-30-2016, 02:03 AM
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Originally Posted by 97 SL320 View Post
Some shrouds use thin rubber flaps in the non fan area that close to allow the fan to pull air but open at highway speeds to allow more air flow.
Yea, the rubber flaps are a good idea. Thanks.
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  #26  
Old 06-30-2016, 09:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coasttocoast View Post
I guess cheap is a relative term. Although you can buy a new block for under $500 and a used short block for about the same, it's all the other items that make up the real cost. But turbo? With a cam, head work, tune and exhaust it's easy to get over 400 HP to the wheels. With minimal boost and no change to the internals your over 600HP.
Yes, all relative... But like you said, and with dyno numbers to back it up:
https://sites.google.com/site/sloppywiki/sloppy-builds/colorado

Impressive, and since I learned a few months ago about how "Cheap" (relatively speaking) this power can be had from such a common lump, it's really piqued my interest too.
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  #27  
Old 07-01-2016, 01:00 AM
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Engine out

Another 2 1/2 hours tonight and the engine is out and on the floor! Yea!

7 1/2 hours total, all by myself.

Pretty straight forward removal, with keeping the tail of the trans low till almost out and then used a come along to start bringing it up to level as I pulled it forward, up, and out.

'69 230 build w/LQ4 swap-image.jpeg

Now to start prepping for the new heart.
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  #28  
Old 07-01-2016, 01:23 AM
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The engine bay looks pretty good. The only rust I see so far is a small soft spot that I think is from a leaking heater core. This car must have spent a lot of time in the garage because I didn't find one rusty bolt. Everything unbolted like it was put together yesterday.

'69 230 build w/LQ4 swap-image.jpeg

Looks like I have a little more room than I thought to snake the drivers side exhaust through. Fingers crossed

I tracked my engine today and it should be to Long Beach Tuesday. Then a week or two to Honolulu.

I paid Patrick G to spec the camshaft for this engine based on it being transplanted from a 3/4 ton truck into 3100 lb Mercedes. With the goal of maximum performance with minimal lope at idle, to match a stock torque converter and the MB's 230's rear gear ratio.

Since this is cam has a higher lift different valve springs are required. I ordered the cam, springs, gaskets, and new pushrods from Texas Speed. Tracking shows to me next Tuesday.
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  #29  
Old 07-02-2016, 07:40 AM
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Hi OP. I wouldn't worry about camming the LQ4 yet if I was you, but would focus on getting the engine in first. Love the LS motors, and look forward to following your project. Hope you can get the motor to fit while retaining the steering box and linkages.

From my experience with LS motors, the shortest accessory system is from a Corvette, while the lowest / cheapest intake is from Camaros should you have any space issues. Hotrodders are also now using Delco Remy R4 A/C pancake compressors mounted in front of the passenger side head of to solve chassis rail clearance issues.

I don't remember exactly now, but I think GTOs came with a front sump oil pan.
The accessories / setup you need may be very similar to what's needed to put that motor in a Nissan 240SX, so do some research on that combo for some ideas and off the shelf adapters.

What axle ratio does your car have now?

Randy - Miami
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  #30  
Old 07-02-2016, 07:46 AM
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Is it possible to remove that upper radiator support? That would make your work ahead a lot (ok, maybe a little) simpler. I think one of those guys from downunder did so by drilling out the spot welds, and inserting "nutserts" after.
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