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  #1  
Old 06-02-2017, 11:52 AM
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1963 220s Front Right Brake Caliper(ATE)

Hello Everyone,
I'm new to the forum and recently picked up a 63 220s with about 98,000 on it. I have been slowly doing repairs and having some done at a shop as I bring her back to life. I try to do most of the work myself and have a little experience from working on an old non running 76 Triumph Tr6.

Anyway... My front right caliper is leaking a fair bit of fluid and I was hoping just to get a caliper seal repair kit in hopes it would do the trick.

The car has an ATE (picture attached). I am hoping to buy the repair kit(picture attached also) from Pelican Parts.

Is there anything unique I should know about doing this rebuild or any advice or information anyone can point me to? With my triumph I had an old manual that broke down all the assemblies and everything which made these sort of things a lot easier for me.

Thanks in advance and excited to join the community!
Attached Thumbnails
1963 220s Front Right Brake Caliper(ATE)-screen-shot-2017-06-02-8.49.16-am.png   1963 220s Front Right Brake Caliper(ATE)-img_1841.jpg  
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  #2  
Old 06-02-2017, 12:08 PM
meltedpanda's Avatar
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Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Central Ky
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Pretty straight forward R/R. Do you have a cylinder hone?
Just finished (well not finished)my rebuild of my 62 220 to get her road worthy. Glad to have you join us ! Let us know how we can help
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99 E320 THE Queen Mary
62 220b - Dolly - Finally my Finny!
72 450SL, Pearl-SOLD
16 F350 6.7 Diesel -THOR
07 Lexus RX 350 - Lexi
14 38HP John Deere 3038E Tractor -Mean Green
84 300SD, Benjamin -SOLD
71 220 - W115-Libby ( my first love) -SOLD
73 280 - W114 "Organspende" Rest in Peace
81 380 SL - Rest in Peace
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  #3  
Old 06-02-2017, 12:08 PM
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Do not rebuild just one side. Always rebuild in pairs/axle sets. Do not split the calipers.
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  #4  
Old 06-03-2017, 12:22 AM
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Thanks Panda and Mike!

So if I am hoping just to replace the seals is a cylinder hone entirely necessary as I hope not have to do anything with the pistons except replace their seals.

On that same note, the front brakes were redone by a mechanic about 2 years ago and the other day when I was pressed the brakes I heard and felt a pop on the front right side and its been leaking fluid since. Is the idea of replacing brakes in pairs just to have consistency in wear on these parts?

Thanks again!
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  #5  
Old 06-03-2017, 03:09 AM
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Why not buy one ready to go here? I recently replaced both my front calipers from them. I ate the core charge because it would have cost more to ship it back. So, about $75 each including shipping. Looks like this link will have to be copied and pasted in Google or just go to Parts Geek.

http://www.*********.com/catalog/1963/mercedes/220s/brake/brake_caliper.html

Last edited by Tubbers; 06-03-2017 at 06:28 PM.
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  #6  
Old 06-03-2017, 08:17 AM
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I'd do them all or at least in pairs. Hone is not necessary but recommended . You can also use a piece of leather or similar, you just want them good and clean and not pitted. If you get in there and find them pitted you may need to buy. Good luck
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Ron
99 E320 THE Queen Mary
62 220b - Dolly - Finally my Finny!
72 450SL, Pearl-SOLD
16 F350 6.7 Diesel -THOR
07 Lexus RX 350 - Lexi
14 38HP John Deere 3038E Tractor -Mean Green
84 300SD, Benjamin -SOLD
71 220 - W115-Libby ( my first love) -SOLD
73 280 - W114 "Organspende" Rest in Peace
81 380 SL - Rest in Peace
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  #7  
Old 06-03-2017, 08:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gouldie the '63 220s View Post
Thanks Panda and Mike!

So if I am hoping just to replace the seals is a cylinder hone entirely necessary as I hope not have to do anything with the pistons except replace their seals.

On that same note, the front brakes were redone by a mechanic about 2 years ago and the other day when I was pressed the brakes I heard and felt a pop on the front right side and its been leaking fluid since. Is the idea of replacing brakes in pairs just to have consistency in wear on these parts?

Thanks again!
Honing is not really necessary. The sealing occurs between the surface of the pistons and the O ring. The critical areas on the calipers are the grooves for the O rings and the seal seat pockets. Clean these extremely well. I use small wire brushes, steel wool, a dentist's pick (to get into the edges of the O ring seal) and paint thinner/mineral spirits. I do the final wash using hot, soapy water, rinse with clean water and blow dry it using compressed air.

Many people use BrakeKleen or its ilk and have good success. I'm not a proponent of the nasty crap but it's your car, lungs and money.

The piston is the main component. 90% of them can be cleaned and re-used with no problems. The thing you need to watch for is rust which has penetrated the polished surface of the "drum". Rust around the top of the piston, inside the cavity and the bottom edge is common and is of no concern as these can easily be cleaned and are not part of the sealing surfaces. Do NOT use a steel brush on the polished areas of the pistons.

Re-assembly can be a finicky procedure. Insert the O rings, ensure they are seated fully into the grooves of the caliper, lube them with brake fluid, lube the piston and evenly work the piston into the caliper. You'll need to move around the rim of the piston to get it to slide into place. Do not force it or use a vise. Compress the piston about 2/3 rds of the way down and fit the dust boot over the piston and into the receiving area of the caliper housing.

Repeat 3 more times for the remaining pistons or take Tubber's advice and avoid the aggravation.

Yes, the idea of replacing in axle pairs is to ensure you have even pressure/operation.
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  #8  
Old 06-04-2017, 03:00 PM
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I can't thank everyone enough for all the knowledge and advice. I'm going to go ahead and replace both calipers with the ones mentioned! I'm going to also eat the core charge and buy the $12 kit and rebuild the onces I have at my leisure, seems to be good to have a set ready and for the general knowledge and price it seems worth it!

Again I appreciate all the help! I'll keep you posted on the install and brake-down / assembly when the new ones arrive! =D
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  #9  
Old 06-04-2017, 03:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gouldie the '63 220s View Post
I can't thank everyone enough for all the knowledge and advice. I'm going to go ahead and replace both calipers with the ones mentioned! I'm going to also eat the core charge and buy the $12 kit and rebuild the onces I have at my leisure, seems to be good to have a set ready and for the general knowledge and price it seems worth it!

Again I appreciate all the help! I'll keep you posted on the install and brake-down / assembly when the new ones arrive! =D
It'll be so much easier. My old ones are hanging in the garage. They're basically scrap metal.
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  #10  
Old 06-07-2017, 06:45 PM
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Hi again,
So the calipers came in the mail! they one I ordered refurbished ATE's, except one seems off brand as the color is different as well as some of the casting detailing on the unit. Anyway, going to do the swap soon and realized I don't have any information I need like a service manual for torque settings etc. So two questions:

Is there anything unique I should do in the process of swapping the calipers? (this is my first caliper replacement.)

Is there an online resource to either buy or get free access to a manual or the information from the service manual for my car?

Thanks in advance! You all are the driving force to getting her back on the road!
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  #11  
Old 06-07-2017, 08:33 PM
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CTD CTD is offline
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Since you mentioned service manuals, I'd recommend you buy this factory service manual here (it's at a halfway decent price):

MERCEDES SHOP MANUAL SERVICE REPAIR BOOK WORKSHOP 1959 | eBay

You'll be glad you got it. Everything on a 1962 220Sb will be very well covered in that book.

These little Chilton books can be useful as well:

Vtg MERCEDES BENZ Chilton Repair & Tune-Up Guide Hardcover CLEAN 1970 Manual | eBay

Regarding calipers, I don't think there should be much of anything unusual about them when compared to other calipers. While the wheel's off for the calipers, I'd inspect the brake hoses to make sure they're in good shape, and if not, replace them. And make sure there's a rubber cover on the bleeder on your new caliper.
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  #12  
Old 06-07-2017, 08:58 PM
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calipers are straight forward R/R , pay attention to torque when taking off and return likewise . there are only two bolts, I looked in my manual and could not find a torque spec, but 85 ft pds is what I remember .You have to remove brake line of course, a set of metric flair wrenches will help.
A good basic cheap manual is
Mercedes-Benz 220b 59-65 Autobook by Veloce Press Paperback Book
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Ron
99 E320 THE Queen Mary
62 220b - Dolly - Finally my Finny!
72 450SL, Pearl-SOLD
16 F350 6.7 Diesel -THOR
07 Lexus RX 350 - Lexi
14 38HP John Deere 3038E Tractor -Mean Green
84 300SD, Benjamin -SOLD
71 220 - W115-Libby ( my first love) -SOLD
73 280 - W114 "Organspende" Rest in Peace
81 380 SL - Rest in Peace
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  #13  
Old 06-08-2017, 03:48 AM
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Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 53
Before you remove the brake lines seal the master cylinder cap with a plastic baggie. Retighten the cap and this prevents the fluid from leaking out of the lines. Don't forget to remove the plastic when you bleed the lines. I put blue Loctite on my caliper bolts and "torqued" (muscled) them til they felt good.

Last edited by Tubbers; 06-08-2017 at 03:20 PM.
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  #14  
Old 06-11-2017, 10:48 PM
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Location: Northern CA
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I'll be replacing these on the street so wish me luck! The advice for the plastic baggie on the master will keep me in good graces with the neighborhood i suspect. If I dont get my Manuals in time Ill go with 85 ft lbs and see how confident that feels! Do you guys think the Chilton manual(dated 1970) will apply to my 1963?

Also, I'm looking to get some new tires and have read through the advice on this forum to move to a 14" wheel, but that's not great on the wallet for me so should I start a new thread to pose a question about tire size and whether tubes are necessary or is it ok or better to keep asking questions in a thread?(I'm fairly new to forums!)?
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  #15  
Old 06-12-2017, 08:29 AM
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Location: Chapel Hill, NC
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You can put the rubber caps from the bleeders on the brake lines to stave the dripping. The only tire manufacturer making the correct 13" radial tire for a fin car (185/80 R13) is Maxis. They have a thin whitewall and can be found for under $100 ea. They are decent tires but have a habit of flatspotting if they sit for a while. That will go away after a mile or so. Cheaper than changing all five wheels and trim covers plus tires. And your speedo will still be accurate.
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