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  #1  
Old 05-17-2018, 09:24 AM
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1971 W108 M180 electric radiator fan idea

One of the new technologies that I like about a lot of cars built in the last several decades is the use of electric fans on a need basis in lieu of engine driven cooling fans.
So my idea is to remove the fan from the engine and the front auxiliary fan. Then engineer electric fans just behind the radiator triggered and regulated on a need basis based on engine temperature and AC needs.
Besides the need to engineer the physical mounting and cowling I see a need for a larger alternator and battery.
What else do I need to consider?
Is it even reasonably possible to achieve?
Thanks
Brad
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  #2  
Old 05-17-2018, 09:46 AM
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Location: Tucson, AZ
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My 280C and 250C use electric fans only and have for years. This is here in Tucson where it has been known to get a bit "warmish" during the eight months of summer we experience. My 220D ran for eight years using only the original MB electric fan. The clutch fan took a "poo" and I eliminated it. Never had a problem.

Upgrade the battery, cables (especially the earthing strap) and alternator.
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Old 05-17-2018, 10:38 AM
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Location: Modesto CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bracurrie View Post
One of the new technologies that I like about a lot of cars built in the last several decades is the use of electric fans on a need basis in lieu of engine driven cooling fans.
Suggest that you think thru your objectives in doing the proposed change.
What is to be gained, what would be lost?
What control strategies will be required; how would those strategies be executed?
What will be the net change in energy consumption?
Etc.
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  #4  
Old 05-17-2018, 03:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Reiner View Post
Suggest that you think thru your objectives in doing the proposed change.
What is to be gained, what would be lost?
What control strategies will be required; how would those strategies be executed?
What will be the net change in energy consumption?
I bought this car to be a daily driver and as it is not a coveted model loss of originality isn't a issue.
I hope to gain better cooling in traffic.
Eliminate fan noise when accelerating.
Control strategies would use existing temperature sensors and relays.
I would guess the change in energy consumption would be the added power for the alternator, but I do not know that for sure.
Brad
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  #5  
Old 05-17-2018, 05:08 PM
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Location: Bandon, Oregon
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Almost every car(and truck) manufactured today has an electric fan so I think the advantages are obvious. There is constant parasitic loss from the belt driven fan even when not engaged. Also a slowly rotating fan actually reduces air flow through the radiator at highway speed. The Lincoln VIII fan is what you should consider. You can get them at the Pick and Pull cheap and they move incredible air. It is almost exactly the same size as the fan shroud on my 3.5. There is a proportional controller available that only runs the fan at the speed needed instead of on/off like most electric fans. You will need an upgraded alternator.

Electric Radiator Fans - Hot Rod Network

http://www.fordmuscle.com/archives/2006/10/Mark8Fan/

constant temperature controllers
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1971 280SE 3.5 Coupe(soon to be 5.6)
European Version
Manual transmission

Last edited by Tony H; 05-17-2018 at 05:19 PM.
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  #6  
Old 05-17-2018, 06:13 PM
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Location: Modesto CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony H View Post
Almost every car(and truck) manufactured today has an electric fan so I think the advantages are obvious. There is constant parasitic loss from the belt driven fan even when not engaged. Also a slowly rotating fan actually reduces air flow through the radiator at highway speed. The Lincoln VIII fan is what you should consider. You can get them at the Pick and Pull cheap and they move incredible air. It is almost exactly the same size as the fan shroud on my 3.5. There is a proportional controller available that only runs the fan at the speed needed instead of on/off like most electric fans. You will need an upgraded alternator.

Electric Radiator Fans - Hot Rod Network

Electric Fan Conversion Using the Notorious Lincoln Mark VIII Fan - FordMuscle

constant temperature controllers
Quote:
Originally Posted by bracurrie View Post
I bought this car to be a daily driver and as it is not a coveted model loss of originality isn't a issue.
I hope to gain better cooling in traffic.
Eliminate fan noise when accelerating.
Control strategies would use existing temperature sensors and relays.
I would guess the change in energy consumption would be the added power for the alternator, but I do not know that for sure.
Brad
Tony H has covered an important point with respect to fan noise; a proportional, variable speed controller is required to minimize noise.

As to cooling, look first to the overall condition of the water system, and particularly to an area that is almost always overlooked: the water pump housing. The inside surface of the pump housing is shaped to match the shape of the blades of the pump impeller. Over time, the effects of corrosion/erosion will increase the clearance between the impeller and the housing, which increases the internal bypass/leakage. The leakage is a greater percentage of the nominal pump displacement at low pump speeds than at higher speeds. The usual case is that cooling system performance that is acceptable at highway speeds is rather poor at lower in-town speeds. Increased airflow may be of some help, but will not compensate for low water flow.

Last edited by Frank Reiner; 05-17-2018 at 10:52 PM.
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  #7  
Old 05-17-2018, 10:18 PM
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Thanks Tony and Frank. Your replies are exactly the useful information this forum provides.
Frank - I have to pull and rebuild at least the crank and main bearings of the engine (The heads were rebuilt by previous owner and I have strong and even compression) so I will check out the water pump. It looks like it has been recently replaced but as most everything will be examined I will eliminate that as a possibility.
Even when water pump works nominally the 71 M180 MFI engine had problems with running hot. The radiator was re-cored and I had the extra cooling line from the aft sensor installed and that did bring the temps down in the back third of the engine.
I am also looking at the 123Ignition distributor to better control advance to further improve temperature control and overall performance.
Once I get this machine sorted out I intend to drive it hard so I want every advantage I can reasonably obtain. Going back to the mid 1970s every MB I have driven seemed to work better if driven hard.
I am reminded of the ridiculous advise I was given when I first bought this car. Someone told me I could NEVER expect to drive it over 65 mph for any length of time. Well when driving on I-40 back and forth to Memphis I will average 75 with regular stints at 90.
Brad
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  #8  
Old 05-18-2018, 12:07 AM
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Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Bandon, Oregon
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When I was stationed in Germany I had a '67 250S 4 speed and I would drive it at 100MPH on the Autobahn with no trouble. I remember seeing flashing headlights way in the rear and then a Porsche or whatever would fly by me.
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