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-   -   HPR for late model Mercedes common rail diesels? (http://www.peachparts.com/shopforum/showthread.php?t=411430)

cmac2012 03-16-2021 04:49 PM

HPR for late model Mercedes common rail diesels?
 
I've been reading about the issues of B5 vs. B20 for use in the later model diesel engines. I also gather that one of several reasons that Mercedes will not be selling diesels in the US has to do in part with the prevalence of B20 in US pumps. Prevalent might not be the right word, I'm not really sure if it is the dominant bio blend on the market. It's not an issue I've had to worry about so I've not had to look for B5. But I understand that modern Sprinter class rigs have the common rail engines that don't play well with B20.

What I don't know is if HPR is above these issues. Gen 1 biodiesel uses methanol in the brewing/distillation of the stuff. Correct me if I'm wrong but HPR does not. Not sure if that's the only reason that 20%+ gen 1 is a problem.

I did a quick search to see if this question had been addressed before, I suspect it has come up, but I couldn't find it.

Felching 03-17-2021 01:14 AM

HPR is animal rendering based biodiesel. It doesn't have the high pressure polymerization issues vegetable based biodiesel does.

The issue with Bio isn't that is 20%, its there is no standardization for what makes up biodiesel. Soy, cellulose, algae, fat, etc and they all perform differently. My 617 for example, runs like a dog turd on cellulose bio (with even as little as B5), indeterminable from diesel other than smell on soy, and far better than diesel on HPR.

Phillytwotank 03-17-2021 06:49 AM

Everything is at least B5

cmac2012 03-17-2021 07:22 PM

That’s what I’m finding. Turns out that the sulfur compounds in Dino are/were a big part of what gives it any lubricity. Maybe all of it, not sure. Hard to imagine that the only way to add lubricity is by adding 5% or so bio diesel.

One would think that the major oil companies would want to know what they were putting in their diesel. I did some market research last night, none of the diesel pumps I found were marked with either B5 or B20. Search indicates that B5 or less can be labeled diesel number 2. I knew that B20 Had some slightly increased green cred, not sure who profits from that, I understand fleets that use it do, not sure if the station gets any sort of benefit.

I’m pretty sure that HPR would be OK for common rail engines, it’s a lot different from first gen bio diesel, it’s refinement is much more like what is done with dino, or so I’ve read.

One of my clients is talking about buying a Mercedes Sprinter and having me do the camper conversion. I want to be able to give her accurate information about fuels. You would think there would be more info online about HPR and late-model diesels.

cmac2012 03-17-2021 07:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Felching (Post 4151108)
HPR is animal rendering based biodiesel. It doesn't have the high pressure polymerization issues vegetable based biodiesel does.

The issue with Bio isn't that is 20%, its there is no standardization for what makes up biodiesel. Soy, cellulose, algae, fat, etc and they all perform differently. My 617 for example, runs like a dog turd on cellulose bio (with even as little as B5), indeterminable from diesel other than smell on soy, and far better than diesel on HPR.

My 617 and 603 both seem to run better on HPR.


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