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  #31  
Old 10-27-2009, 07:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Renntag View Post
So who else is using WVO/SVO?

Roll Call !
100,000+ WVO miles on 5 vehicles (70,000+ on the 190 alone). Loving every money saving mile!

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  #32  
Old 10-27-2009, 08:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phyxer View Post
know these cars were designed to run on diesel fuel
Some "less informed" people would claim that all diesels were designed to run on vegetable oil.
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  #33  
Old 10-27-2009, 08:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lupin..the..3rd View Post
I hope your budget includes a new injection pump. You're gonna need it sooner than you think.
I too thank you for your "opinion". My experience and many THOUSANDS of trouble free miles say otherwise. Besides, the new ULSD has less lubricity than the former D2, so the IP could use the lubricity that VO provides. I have yet to find any actual real world cases of IP failure do to the PROPER use of VO. Even if I do get a bad IP, they are plentiful in the wrecking yards for less than $100.
All of the newbies to VO should rely on the experience of those with thousands of VO miles, and not the naysayers that camp out on these forums.
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  #34  
Old 10-27-2009, 08:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ROLLGUY View Post
Besides, the new ULSD has less lubricity than the former D2, so the IP could use the lubricity that VO provides
Lubricity means squat. The acid, food fat and glycerin in VO is what kills pumps and engines.
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  #35  
Old 10-27-2009, 08:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Les Jenkins View Post
Lubricity means squat. The acid, food fat and glycerin in VO is what kills pumps and engines.
there is no glycerin inharent in veggie.
glycerin is one of the by products of a chemical reaction between
veggie oil and a combination of heat, methanol, and lye.

I agree that acids and fats need to be removed before use.
Filtering, and washing low PH, high fat veggie oil is probably a good idea.

I think your engine, and injection pump would disagree with your idea
that lubricity means squat.
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  #36  
Old 10-27-2009, 09:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichC View Post
there is no glycerin inharent in veggie.
Its the chemical compounds that result in the glycerin. Calling it glycerin is a simplification.

Quote:
I think your engine, and injection pump would disagree with your idea that lubricity means squat.
Not much of that is evident after reading through some of your past VO related posts. You seem quick to make attacks, assumptions and guesses.

Last edited by Les Jenkins; 10-28-2009 at 02:49 PM. Reason: grammar
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  #37  
Old 10-27-2009, 10:00 PM
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I have witnessed Rich's entire fleet run on wvo for years and never seen a failure as a result. So, I suspect he knows more than most regarding running the stuff.
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  #38  
Old 10-28-2009, 09:42 PM
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Thanks for the compliment.

But I still bow to your greater wisdom.

MOOOO !!!!
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  #39  
Old 11-03-2009, 11:53 AM
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I just bought a '75 240D with the intention of converting it to a 2 tank heated wvo system. But in my further research I learned about making Biodiesel, which also seems like a viable option.

I live in Minnesota, and it gets cold here. Negative Fahrenheit temperatures are common in winter, so whatever I do I'll need some sort of heating system from what I've read.

I'm trying to decide what to do here because I want to run on alternative fuels while taking the best care of my engine that I can. So I search on here and I find a bunch of people insulting each other - The purist diesel-power fanatics vengefully lacking the will to accept the validity of other options vs. The eco-fanatic greasers with an equal tendency toward narcissistic, opinionated, self-inflating remarks. And nobody wants to discuss or demonstrate.

So, please, straight answers. Opinions aside and observations at the ready: How does running wvo carefully (well filtered, properly heated, two tank system, starting/stopping with dynodiesel, etc.) effect an engine? How does properly made biodiesel effect an engine?

Of wvo-biodiesel and straight wvo, which is more practical for sub-zero temperatures?

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  #40  
Old 11-03-2009, 12:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TylerFrank View Post
I just bought a '75 240D with the intention of converting it to a 2 tank heated wvo system. But in my further research I learned about making Biodiesel, which also seems like a viable option.

I live in Minnesota, and it gets cold here. Negative Fahrenheit temperatures are common in winter, so whatever I do I'll need some sort of heating system from what I've read.

I'm trying to decide what to do here because I want to run on alternative fuels while taking the best care of my engine that I can. So I search on here and I find a bunch of people insulting each other - The purist diesel-power fanatics vengefully lacking the will to accept the validity of other options vs. The eco-fanatic greasers with an equal tendency toward narcissistic, opinionated, self-inflating remarks. And nobody wants to discuss or demonstrate.

So, please, straight answers. Opinions aside and observations at the ready: How does running wvo carefully (well filtered, properly heated, two tank system, starting/stopping with dynodiesel, etc.) effect an engine? How does properly made biodiesel effect an engine?

Of wvo-biodiesel and straight wvo, which is more practical for sub-zero temperatures?

IMO, you're overall best bet is running Biodiesel. It will gell at a higher temperature than diesel, but a blend will take care of that problem. One thing to remember, the gell temperature is affected by both the type of oil and its usage. This is the same as if you were running WVO, but WVO will take a long time to properly heat in real cold weather. WVO is always thicker too.
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  #41  
Old 11-03-2009, 12:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by probear View Post
IMO, you're overall best bet is running Biodiesel. It will gell at a higher temperature than diesel, but a blend will take care of that problem. One thing to remember, the gell temperature is affected by both the type of oil and its usage. This is the same as if you were running WVO, but WVO will take a long time to properly heat in real cold weather. WVO is always thicker too.

Even though I run one two tank car and blend in two others I think probear is on the money for your situation. It doesn't get nearly as cold where we are as opposed to where you are. I don't do bio d because I'm not crazy about the chemical aspect and mist washing the stuff then disposing of the glycerin by product. I just collect, settle, spin in my centrifuge and put in the cars. Very little waste and it's just much simpler for me.
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'02 VW Golf soon to be on the road again
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Gone but not forgotten:
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  #42  
Old 11-03-2009, 01:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muleears View Post
Even though I run one two tank car and blend in two others I think probear is on the money for your situation. It doesn't get nearly as cold where we are as opposed to where you are. I don't do bio d because I'm not crazy about the chemical aspect and mist washing the stuff then disposing of the glycerin by product. I just collect, settle, spin in my centrifuge and put in the cars. Very little waste and it's just much simpler for me.
I did BioD for a year on the truck before converting to SVO. Bio is a pain and there is lots of chance for making bad fuel or a batch of snotty peanutbutter milk shake looking junk. Also when running on 50% or more bio I felt a loss in power. on SVO I feel NO difference in power grossing 22k with my camper. I have not made bio in a year now since I converted.

I also use a CF to spin my oil. the gravity fed CF is the BEST way to clean oil! over 1,000 gal so far in the truck and my 2 micron polish filter shows no signs of slowing. I probably burned 300 gal this summer pulling my 5er and no change in power vs d2. My truck is much happier on veggie then d2.

So as others have said if done right, VO is good and will not harm your motor. again IF DONE RIGHT!

My buddy has 300k miles on his truck and the last 100k are on vo in 3 years and he pulls his trailer almost 100% of those miles (grossing 20k ish)
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  #43  
Old 11-03-2009, 04:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TylerFrank View Post
I just bought a '75 240D with the intention of converting it to a 2 tank heated wvo system. But in my further research I learned about making Biodiesel, which also seems like a viable option.

I live in Minnesota, and it gets cold here. Negative Fahrenheit temperatures are common in winter, so whatever I do I'll need some sort of heating system from what I've read.

I'm trying to decide what to do here because I want to run on alternative fuels while taking the best care of my engine that I can. So I search on here and I find a bunch of people insulting each other - The purist diesel-power fanatics vengefully lacking the will to accept the validity of other options vs. The eco-fanatic greasers with an equal tendency toward narcissistic, opinionated, self-inflating remarks. And nobody wants to discuss or demonstrate.

So, please, straight answers. Opinions aside and observations at the ready: How does running wvo carefully (well filtered, properly heated, two tank system, starting/stopping with dynodiesel, etc.) effect an engine? How does properly made biodiesel effect an engine?

Of wvo-biodiesel and straight wvo, which is more practical for sub-zero temperatures?

Run 2 MBs on home made bio and ran an old PowerStroke on WVO. I'm fully convinced it's the way to go. Bio is a bit more trouble to make, but I drive the MBs mostly on short jaunts (although have racked up tens of thousands of trouble free miles on the stuff). Drove the PowerStroke several thousand miles on two tank system (home made) and doubt that the engine was damaged in any way. Ended up selling it to a friend because I really didn't need all those vehicles. If I was travelling on the highway, I'd almost certainly go the WVO route - much less work once the system is in place. If either of my cars quit today and I junked them both, I would still be dollars ahead on the money I've saved on fuel (assuming labor was free). However I am confident that neither will quit any time soon.
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  #44  
Old 11-03-2009, 10:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TylerFrank View Post


So, please, straight answers. Opinions aside and observations at the ready: How does running wvo carefully (well filtered, properly heated, two tank system, starting/stopping with dynodiesel, etc.) effect an engine? How does properly made biodiesel effect an engine?

Of wvo-biodiesel and straight wvo, which is more practical for sub-zero temperatures?

IMO a heated two tank system using well filtered, de-watered oil is just as good or better for your engine than running Dino, or B100 in a single tank in any climate. The only way to run a single tank WVO in cold climate, is to have the car garaged with a block heater and injection line heaters. That would not be as practical as a two tank system (need electricity if parked for more than a few hours). Those of us in moderate climates don't need as much heat to properly use WVO.
I also think that a good Water Injection System will reverse the effects of coking that occur with all fuels (yes, even Dino D causes coking). There are many users of WVO/SVO/B100 on this forum with thousands of trouble free miles that would gladly share there experience with you.
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  #45  
Old 11-04-2009, 10:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TylerFrank View Post
I just bought a '75 240D with the intention of converting it to a 2 tank heated wvo system. But in my further research I learned about making Biodiesel, which also seems like a viable option.

I live in Minnesota, and it gets cold here. Negative Fahrenheit temperatures are common in winter, so whatever I do I'll need some sort of heating system from what I've read.

I'm trying to decide what to do here because I want to run on alternative fuels while taking the best care of my engine that I can. So I search on here and I find a bunch of people insulting each other - The purist diesel-power fanatics vengefully lacking the will to accept the validity of other options vs. The eco-fanatic greasers with an equal tendency toward narcissistic, opinionated, self-inflating remarks. And nobody wants to discuss or demonstrate.

So, please, straight answers. Opinions aside and observations at the ready: How does running wvo carefully (well filtered, properly heated, two tank system, starting/stopping with dynodiesel, etc.) effect an engine? How does properly made biodiesel effect an engine?

Of wvo-biodiesel and straight wvo, which is more practical for sub-zero temperatures?


At the risk of being labeled an "eco-fanatic greaser" I will say I like your attitude. Never mind the bullocks, lets get down to business....

Now that have a good canidate for running alt fuels. (75 240D )

You will need a consistant supply of good oil.
And by good I mean.
Not burnt to death by weeks of use.
Not high fat.
No grill cleaners.
As little water as possible.

I have had good luck with clear soybean oils.
Rumor has it that canola is the better oil but I have no experience with it.

Next you will need some sort of filtration/dewatering/testing equipment.
No matter what direction you decide to go your oil will need to be filtered and dewatered.

I use a centrifuge and hydraulic filters for filtering and dewatering.

I filter to 3 micron absolute.
which means no particle larger than 3 microns gets past the filter.
Not 3 micron average, but absolute, there is a big difference.

And, I ocassionly do a hot pan test for water in my oil.

Then you can make your decision to use svo, svo-two-tank, biodiesel, blends, etc...

It mostly depends upon where you want to put most of the work.
Into the car, and fuel system.
Into a biodiesel refinery system in the garage.
Average ambient temprature does come into play.
But is not the only consideration.


Step one
Find a resturant that you like, and find out what kind of oil they use, and if you can collect some.
This will probably take you longer than you may first think.

Step two
Setup your filtering system...
This will also take some time.

Step three
Make the decision about using wvo, wvo-two-tank, biodiesel, blends, etc..

I suggest trying all options before settling on one.
There is no other way that I know of to figure out what will work best.

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