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  #1  
Old 08-21-2004, 09:52 PM
Ron in SC's Avatar
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300E front and rear shock replacement: Special tools needed?

Are any special tools or sockets needed to replace the front and rear shocks on a 92 300E?

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  #2  
Old 08-22-2004, 12:55 PM
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Depends on what you mean by special. To remove the strut nut you need a metric hex to hold the shaft, but the replacement Bilstein I bought to replace one failed front shock about ten years ago was Torx.

The two bolts that tie the strut to the knuckle are common metric hex head.

Place jackstands under the front control arms so the weight of the car keeps the springs compressed.

Also suggest you replace the dust boot bellows as they typically don't last as long as the struts.

A couple of years ago I removed the front struts to change the dust bellows and it was not much more than a one-hour job. Also, while the strut is off I suggest you remove the upper strut mounts and give them a thorough cleaning and inspection as they can deteriorate before the shocks need replacement. Mine were like new.

Duke
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  #3  
Old 07-12-2005, 03:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duke2.6
Depends on what you mean by special. To remove the strut nut you need a metric hex to hold the shaft, but the replacement Bilstein I bought to replace one failed front shock about ten years ago was Torx.

The two bolts that tie the strut to the knuckle are common metric hex head.

Place jackstands under the front control arms so the weight of the car keeps the springs compressed.

Also suggest you replace the dust boot bellows as they typically don't last as long as the struts.

A couple of years ago I removed the front struts to change the dust bellows and it was not much more than a one-hour job. Also, while the strut is off I suggest you remove the upper strut mounts and give them a thorough cleaning and inspection as they can deteriorate before the shocks need replacement. Mine were like new.

Duke
Duke would this be the same procedure of the rears too. I am thinking of replacing all four shocks. I am not a mechanic but am fairly handy. I have heard that this is not a big deal. Can you elaborate a bit more for me?

Thanks.
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Old 07-12-2005, 04:55 PM
Sportlines
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Johnson City, TN
Posts: 985
I'm not Duke, but have done this job twice. First time I used two 4 x 4's under the control arms. I did one side at a time. Raise car with a floor jack, remove front wheel, and then lower onto 4x 4's.

The second time I raised car on floor jack, place jack stand for safety, then used a bottle jack under the control arm to compress the spring. You should inspect the upper shock mounts for cracks. They could be ready for replacement.

You need to know that these are gas pressure struts and shocks. They can be a pain during installation. You will need something to pry with. I have a jumbo straight slot screw driver that works well. In other words when you have the top of the new strut installed, then you have to use leverage it up to get the bolt holes to align. The bottle jack helps in the bolt hole alignment process.

The rears are easier, but still a little bit of a struggle fighting the compression.

Be sure to get an alignment after replacing the struts.

Steve
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  #5  
Old 07-12-2005, 04:58 PM
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Location: Southern California
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I haven't replaced a rear shock, but to access the fasterners the lower control arm plastic aero cover and trunk side panels must be removed - not a big deal. Once off you will be able to see the fasterners and determine what tools are required, and the R&I might be possible with the car sitting on the tires if there is enough ground clearance to extract the shocks from the bottom of the rear control arms. The rear shocks are not part of the suspension structure like the front struts. The rear shocks just provide damping forces.

If you have to raise the back end for work clearance or to provide adequate clearance to extract the shocks from below, support the car on the lower control arms to contain the springs, since the shocks have the rebound stops.

The rear lower control arms are the main load bearing member as both the springs and shocks connect to them, so it will support the weight of the car. The other four links provide geomety control and transmit brake and drive thrust to the chassis.

Duke
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  #6  
Old 07-13-2005, 12:22 AM
Robert Ryan
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 222
Check out my DIY on replacing the ball joints on the 124 (300e) - it shows how to support the control arm (and presents some of the hazards) and the sizes of the tools required to remove the struts. I beleive it's a 7mm allen wrench and a 22mm box-end socket to get the top of the strut freed.
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  #7  
Old 07-13-2005, 04:18 AM
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Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Germany
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I also did my front and rear shocks last summer. My new and old fronts were hex at the top. Using 2 floor jacks, one under the control arms, made it easier to adjust the height and insert the new shock. Had to compress on the floor and fit through the mounting hole before it fully extended.
Quesion: Is an alignment necessary after front replacment? I did not have one done, have not noticed any abnormal wear, and it seems the new fronts are fixed in the same position top and bottom by the mounting holes.
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  #8  
Old 07-13-2005, 08:36 AM
LarryBible
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Front shock replacement will not significantly effect alignment.

I also use a floor jack under the lca, one side at a time, but Duke considers this a safety risk. Although I have done it several times and consider it safe, at least for me. I will not dispute ANY claims that might risk anyones safety.

Good luck,

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